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Venice Film Review: ‘Jim & Andy: The Great Beyond — featuring a very special, contractually obligated mention of Tony Clifton’

Venice Film Review: ‘Jim & Andy: The Great Beyond — featuring a very special, contractually obligated mention of Tony Clifton’
When it was announced in the late ’90s that Jim Carrey had been chosen to play Andy Kaufman in a major Hollywood biopic, my gut reaction was skepticism. Carrey, then at the height of his star power, was a brilliant comedian who had more than proved his acting chops (in “The Truman Show”), yet both temperamentally and ethnically he seemed wrong for the part: Kaufman was a doughy nerdy Jewish space cadet, Carrey a hypomanic string-bean Wasp. I knew that Carrey had the talent to “impersonate” anyone, but could he really merge with Kaufman’s antic yet morose there-but-not-quite-there quality?

When I saw the film, I became one of its greatest champions (it wound up being my movie of the year for 1999), and Carrey’s extraordinary performance vaulted over all my doubts. In “Man on the Moon,” he nailed every nuance of Andy Kaufman’s spirit, and he used his own mercurial quality as a comic to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Last Days of Collapse Subject Michael C. Ruppert

The life and final days of Michael C. Ruppert — author, 9/11 Truther, podcaster and prophet of economic collapse — are chronicled by The Verge’s Mat Stroud in a fascinating, quite sad story. Filmmaker readers will remember Ruppert from Chris Smith’s 2009 documentary, Collapse, in which the author discussed his theories of societal collapse in the decades following “peak oil” — the moment in which there is less oil in the ground than has been used by mankind. For Smith, however, the documentary was as much about Ruppert the man as his work. In an interview with Brandon Harris, Smith […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Film: Movie Review: El Sicario: Room 164

El Sicario: Room 164 is a one-man monologue of a documentary, 80-odd minutes spent in a crummy motel suite in the company of a guy with a black mesh cloth covering his head and obscuring his identity. A subject really has to have something to say to justify this kind of film treatment—Michael Ruppert’s hypnotic apocalyptic scenarios in Collapse come to mind—and the unnamed focus of Gianfranco Rosi’s feature has plenty. He’s a former “sicario,” a hit man and enforcer for a drug cartel in Ciudad Juárez who once kidnapped and tortured someone in ...
See full article at The AV Club »

White Out movie trailer and images

See the trailer and images from White Out, directed by Lawrie Brewster, starring Jon Finnegan, Mike McEvoy, Joleen Walton and Nancy Joy Page. Also in the cast of the apocalyptic disaster film are Dougie Clark, Gavin Hugh, Farooqi Muskwati and Leon Simmon. Sarah Daly wrote the script, inspired by Michael C. Ruppert and the documentary Collapse. While the world has escaped the forecast apocalypse of May 21st, a new Scottish feature would suggest that Armageddon is just around the corner. White Out - director Lawrie Brewster’s ambitious début feature - tracks the collapse of civilization in a dystopian near-future Scotland. Oil supplies are scarce, climate change wreaks havoc and the world teeters on the brink of economic meltdown. In the midst of all this, reluctant government volunteer...
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

White Out movie trailer and images

See the trailer and images from White Out, directed by Lawrie Brewster, starring Jon Finnegan, Mike McEvoy, Joleen Walton and Nancy Joy Page. Also in the cast of the apocalyptic disaster film are Dougie Clark, Gavin Hugh, Farooqi Muskwati and Leon Simmon. Sarah Daly wrote the script, inspired by Michael C. Ruppert and the documentary Collapse. While the world has escaped the forecast apocalypse of May 21st, a new Scottish feature would suggest that Armageddon is just around the corner. White Out - director Lawrie Brewster’s ambitious début feature - tracks the collapse of civilization in a dystopian near-future Scotland. Oil supplies are scarce, climate change wreaks havoc and the world teeters on the brink of economic meltdown. In the midst of all this, reluctant government volunteer...
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

White Out movie trailer and images

See the trailer and images from White Out, directed by Lawrie Brewster, starring Jon Finnegan, Mike McEvoy, Joleen Walton and Nancy Joy Page. Also in the cast of the apocalyptic disaster film are Dougie Clark, Gavin Hugh, Farooqi Muskwati and Leon Simmon. Sarah Daly wrote the script, inspired by Michael C. Ruppert and the documentary Collapse. While the world has escaped the forecast apocalypse of May 21st, a new Scottish feature would suggest that Armageddon is just around the corner. White Out - director Lawrie Brewster’s ambitious début feature - tracks the collapse of civilization in a dystopian near-future Scotland. Oil supplies are scarce, climate change wreaks havoc and the world teeters on the brink of economic meltdown. In the midst of all this, reluctant government volunteer...
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

The best documentaries of 2010

Documentaries became a box office factor with the rise of such films as "Hoop Dreams" and "Roger & Me." Before then, there were hit music documentaries like "Woodstock" but most other nonfiction films could expect short runs in few theaters before dutiful audiences. What a small but growing minority of Friday night moviegoers is beginning to discover is that there's a good chance the movie they might enjoy most at the multiplex is a doc.

In alphabetical order, these were the best documentaries I saw in 2010:

"45365" is the zip code of Sidney, Ohio. The brothers Bill and Turner Ross were born there perhaps 30 years ago. They knew everybody in town, and when they spent seven months of 2007 filming its daily life, their presence must have become commonplace. Their film evokes what Winesburg, Ohio might have looked like as a documentary.

The film is privileged. No one is filmed with a hidden camera.
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

Mark Kermode's DVD round-up

Metropolis; Heartbreaker; Whatever Works; Collapse

"The mediator between head and hands must be the heart!" While the DVD market thrives on unnecessary recuts and extended editions (why make new movies when you can endlessly repackage and resell old ones?), the case for an entirely new version of Fritz Lang's Metropolis (1927/2010, Eureka, PG) is stronger than most. Using 16mm materials recently discovered in a small museum in Buenos Aires, this "Masters of Cinema" rerelease reinstates key scenes excised by distributors against Lang's wishes after the film's initial German release, pushing the running time up to about 150 minutes, thereby "solving" many of the narrative ellipses that have troubled scholars and viewers for decades.

The result is a film that comes close to replicating Lang's original vision, although I must confess that the additions (although substantial) had less effect on the overall tone of the movie that I had expected. Maybe I
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Collapse | Film review

For most of Collapse the grey, balding, mustachioed Michael Ruppert sits before the camera in his shirtsleeves, smokes continuously and, eyeballing us like the Ancient Mariner, talks a streak. His theme is the imminent collapse of our world, of how he's been predicting it in his newsletter and blog, and how the world's ruling classes (assisted by the CIA, Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld and other familiar suspects) have concealed the news from us. Through our reliance on oil we've put ourselves in a position from which there is no exit, but his acute analysis is more persuasive than his somewhat vague suggestions of how the world might evolve, one of the more concrete being that you start growing food in your garden or acquire an allotment. Ruppert, the son of two former CIA employees, is a 60-year-old political science graduate of UCLA, a former officer in the Lapd until he
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

This week's new films

Made In Dagenham (15)

(Nigel Cole, 2010, UK) Sally Hawkins, Bob Hoskins, Geraldine James, Jaime Winstone, Miranda Richardson. 113 mins

From the maker of Calendar Girls, another feelgood tale of sisters pulling together for a cause, but this is at least a story worth telling: the 1968 strike by workers at Ford's factory that led to equal pay for women. You know where it's going and you can guess how it's going to get there, but with a best-of-British cast and some sense of purpose, it does the job. In car terms, it's a Mondeo, but with all the trimmings.

Buried (15)

(Rodrigo Cortés, 2010, Spa) Ryan Reynolds. 95 mins

Can Reynolds act his way out of a wooden box? This thriller sticks to its coffin location with admirable determination, heaping on enough scares, surprises and suspense to sustain the claustrophobic premise.

The Secret Of Kells (PG)

(Tomm Moore, 2009, Fra/Bel/Ire) Evan McGuire, Brendan Gleeson. 79 mins

Oscar-nominated Irish animation whose vibrant,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film review: Collapse

A controversial documentary about what happens when the oil runs out could have benefitted from more than one interviewee, says Peter Bradshaw

Chris Smith's documentary centres on a long and disquieting interview with Michael Ruppert, a radical American activist on a mission to expose the "peak oil" cover-up: that is, the authorities' reluctance to prepare us for what happens when oil runs out. It is an important subject, and it raises the question of why more witnesses were not called. The answer seems to be that Smith believes Ruppert should be the focus of the movie; he was once an La police officer, and Smith originally wanted to interview him for his assertion that government authorities controlled the sale of drugs in the inner cities. Ruppert persuaded him that "peak oil" was more important. In some ways, I would have preferred to hear Ruppert on the subject of which
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

This week's new films

Enter The Void (18)

(Gaspar Noé, 2009, Fra/Ger/Ita) Nathaniel Brown, Paz de la Huerta, Cyril Roy. 143 mins

Noé adjusts your set from the inside with a film so hallucinogenic you might need to check into rehab afterwards. Despite some of the furthest-out visuals ever seen, nobody could accuse him of glamorising drugs. Following an American loser through the sleazy side of Tokyo, mostly after his death, it's a long, miserable tale, but the execution is amazing.

The Town (15)

(Ben Affleck, 2010, Us) Ben Affleck, Rebecca Hall. 125 mins

Affleck takes on a whole Boston district in this crime saga, which overextends him a little. It's a serious drama struggling to get out of a generic cops-and-robbers thriller.

Eat Pray Love (PG)

(Ryan Murphy, 2010, Us) Julia Roberts, James Franco, Javier Bardem. 140 mins

Roberts goes to Italy, India and Bali but she's never been to "me" in this emetic hymn to self-absorption.

World's Greatest Dad (15)

(Bobcat Goldthwait,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

DVD Review: Collapse

What’s more relaxing than sitting down at the end of a long hard day, with a buttery tub of popcorn and an ice-cold Coca Cola, and popping in a DVD to watch…a man speak for 80 minutes about – not necessarily an apocalypse of biblical proportions, but let’s call it – the end of the world as we know it. Welcome to the crushing blow that is Collapse. Michael Ruppert is a former Los Angeles police officer and “rogue” reporter. Some might say conspiracy theorist. He made his name as an officer by trying to call out the Central Intelligence Agency for allegedly selling narcotics in the United States. He made his name as a reporter by predicting a major financial crisis that has become all too true. Now, he has a prediction for humanity that is all doom and gloom for our current way of living. For 80 minutes, Collapse
See full article at BuzzFocus.com »

[DVD Review] Collapse

If you've ever been trapped in a conversation with someone who's clearly intelligent, but has an unnerving obsession with lecturing you about the end of the world, you'll get a familiar feeling from watching Collapse. The documentary directed by Chris Smith is 80 minutes of Michael Ruppert sitting in a chair, smoking cigarettes and talking about the economy, energy policy, corrupt government interests, the mainstream media and the imminent end of the world as we know it (this is not an exaggeration). Putting aside the content of what he's saying, this documentary is ultimately disappointing because it does little to differentiate itself from the experience of seeing Ruppert simply sitting and giving a lecture.

The film is shot in a basement, with Ruppert the only clear thing in darkness. As he chain smokes cigarettes and tells the camera about everything from peak oil to the how he predicted the current financial crisis,
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Collapse (review)

Hey, they laughed at Galileo! Yeah, but they laughed at Bozo the Clown, too! There’s a horrifying train wreck quality to documentarian Chris Smith’s (The Yes Men) feature-length interview with Michael Ruppert, former Lapd detective, investigative reporter, CIA whistleblower. Is Ruppert a conspiracy theorist? He laughs at the notion, says he works in “conspiracy fact”... and he’s chillingly plausible as he synthesizes, in 82 clipped minutes, a portrait of industrialized civilization on the brink of collapse. A collapse we’re already in the midst of, commencing with the September 2008 economic crash, which Ruppert had predicted years earlier based on the information he’d gathered. (This interview was conducted in March 2009.) It all comes down to the unsustainability of the Western way of life, which is predicated on cheap, ready oil and built on a pyramid scheme of a monetary system... and shoring up that way of life for
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

This Week On DVD and Blu-ray: June 15, 2010

DVD Links: DVD News | Release Dates | New Dvds | Reviews | RSS Feed

Mystery Train (Criterion Collection) I already reviewed this latest Criterion release last week (read that here), but the short of it is to say that while I am not a fan of the Jim Jarmusch films I have seen, this one really captured my attention. I can't say it's one for everyone, but I would hope if you read my review you should get an idea if it is one for you and on Blu-ray it is a beautiful presentation for a slow-paced film you wouldn't traditionally think needs a high definition presentation, but the photography by Robby Muller is well worth it. The Book of Eli Here is a decent film and I've watched about half of the Blu-ray so far and can say it's a solid presentation though it is much darker than I remember. I think
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

DVD Review: ‘Collapse’ Paints Unsettling Portrait of Approaching Doom

Chicago – Doomsday prophecies are a dime a dozen at the movies these days. We’ve become all too complacent in staring at visions of our planet’s fragility, and the preventable threats to our survival. Most apocalyptic thrillers are pitched at the level of B-movie fantasies that make credible issues like global warming seem as frighteningly real as Godzilla.

That’s why Chris Smith’s documentary, “Collapse,” is the perfect film at the perfect time. It awakens viewers from their impassive daze with a lightning bolt of clarity. There’s no flashy special effects or distracting camerawork. Just a man in a room speaking about the demon that haunts him: his conscience. The man, Michael Ruppert, spent thirty years as an investigative journalist. He trained himself to scan the media and connect the dots. He believes that the dots he’s connected have outlined nothing less than the imminent collapse of human industrial civilization.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Collapse Director Chris Smith on the Decade's First Great Feel-Bad Film

Collapse Director Chris Smith on the Decade's First Great Feel-Bad Film
Imagine the most sincerely encouraging, feel-good movie you've ever seen. Then imagine the 180-degree opposite -- the most sincerely helpless-making, devastating movie you could ever see. Then imagine not being able to look away. That's Collapse in a nutshell, director Chris Smith's one-man show featuring journalist, intellectual and former L.A. cop Michael Ruppert (pictured at right) holding forth about the surpluses, shortages, conspiracies and other looming crises that threaten the world as we know it. Filmed in an empty warehouse setting with its chain-smoking subject fielding the skeptical filmmaker's questions, Collapse is designed to let viewers draw their own conclusions while underscoring the consequences of those conclusions; Smith lets nobody off the hook. The doc's scope and power have demanded reckoning from the Toronto Film Festival (where it premiered last September) to the Berlinale (where it will screen next month) to theaters and even homes nationwide, where it's currently available on demand.
See full article at Movieline »

Culinary Cinema on Berlinale sidebar menu

Culinary Cinema on Berlinale sidebar menu
Cologne, Germany -- Following the success of Robert Kenner's "Food, Inc.", which opened the Berlin Film Festival's Culinary Cinema sidebar last year, Berlin has decided to load its plate with documentaries.

Seven of the 11 films screening as part of the 2010 Culinary Cinema lineup are non-fiction, including an inside look at a pastry competition in Chris Hegedus and D. A. Pennebaker's "Kings of Pastry" and "The Botany of Desire," Michael Schwarz's adaptation of the book on plant passion by "Food, Inc." author Michael Pollan.

Berlin is stretching the definition of food issues to fit in several docs that focus on ecological and social themes. These include Fredrik Gertten's "Bananas!" about the legal battle between Nicaraguan fruit pickers and Dole Food over the use of a banned pesticide; and Chris Smith's "Collapse" in which radical reporter Michael Ruppert apocalyptic vision of a world without crude oil.

Tilda Swinton,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Slackery News Tidbits, January 11

These intros to the news tidbits are always a bit dull, so let's cut to the chase and find out what's going on with Austin film news:

Over at Cinematical, Eric Snider profiled Sundance 2010 film Skateland. What he didn't mention -- and we found out from austin360movies -- is that Skateland director/co-writer Anthony Burns lives in Austin. Parts of the film were shot in Marshall, Texas.We're excited to hear (again through austin360movies, a new Twitter feed you might want to start following) that local writer Alison Macor's book Chainsaws, Slackers, and Spy Kids will become available in March. If you didn't guess from the title, the book is a history of Austin filmmaking.The Austin Chronicle has an interview with local musician Ryan Bingham about his big-screen debut in the film Crazy Heart (Debbie's review).Just a reminder that Chris Smith's film Collapse is
See full article at Slackerwood »
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