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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

1-20 of 127 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross to Talk 'Gone Girl' at 2014 Billboard-Hollywood Reporter Film & TV Music Conference

21 October 2014 5:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross will deliver the Keynote Q&A at the 2014 Billboard + Hollywood Reporter Film & TV Music Conference, taking place on Nov. 5 and 6 in Los Angeles. The two collaborators will discuss their most recent work on the score for Gone Girl. The Hollywood Reporter and Billboard music editor Shirley Halperin will moderate. Gone Girl is the third partnership between Reznor and Ross and director David Fincher, following Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and The Social Network, for which Reznor and Ross won an Academy Award and a Golden Globe. “Each year, we look forward

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- Phil Gallo, Billboard

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The Edward Snowden Documentary Citizenfour Puts You Right in the Room As History Is Made

20 October 2014 1:00 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

If you didn’t know better, you’d think that Laura Poitras’s "Meet Edward Snowden" documentary Citizenfour was an avant-garde paranoid conspiracy thriller. Hold on, it is an avant-garde paranoid conspiracy thriller. It opens with a blurry tunnel; winking monitors scrolling metadata plucked from Americans’ emails; images of huge, futuristic, otherworldy government surveillance centers; encrypted communications — flurries of characters — that resolve into edgy cyberdialogues between the National Security Agency whistleblower and the filmmaker; and, finally, exacting exchanges between Snowden and journalist Glenn Greenwald high up in a blankly modern Hong Kong hotel, which might or might not be bugged. The music by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross is like malignantly buzzing wires that eat into your cerebral cortex.The narrative is relatively straightforward. Poitras explains in voice-over that in the summer of 2013, she received a communiqué from a man calling himself “Citizenfour,” who also asked her to alert Greenwald »

- David Edelstein

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New York 2014 Review: Citizenfour, The Chilling Story Behind Edward Snowden's Explosive Revelations

15 October 2014 7:00 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

In this year's New York Film Festival there were two gripping thrillers, both receiving their world premieres at the festival, and, intriguingly enough, both featuring moodily effective scores by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. One was David Fincher's novel adaptation Gone Girl and the other was Laura Poitras' documentary Citizenfour; the former fictional, the latter very chillingly real. And although it's likely that Citizenfour ultimately won't reach nearly the amount of viewers that Gone Girl will, it is Poitras' film that is essential viewing for anyone even the least bit concerned about the erosion of civil liberties and individual privacy that has occurred steadily since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in the U.S. The changes in America post-9/11 have been the overarching subject of Laura Poitras'...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

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Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’s ‘Gone Girl’ serves its Midwestern claustrophobia chilled

14 October 2014 5:30 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

In 2010, David Fincher reaching out to the frontman from Nine Inch Nails felt like a 90s reunion, a fan casting list straight out of BuzzFeed’s nostalgia machine. In hindsight, Trent Reznor and longtime collaborator Atticus Ross created something far more dour and steely than “The Facebook Movie” in their score for The Social Network and now two of them have golden statues to show for it. In hindsight, it seems like an inevitable collaboration between a director who found his start music videos and two of the most influential voices in music over the last quarter-century. Toss in table scraps from Fincher’s CGI-consumed Panic Room in a 2005 video for “Only,” and yeah, crazier things have happened.

Fast forward four years, dozens of awards nominations, critical acclaim and a follow-up in The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and Reznor and Ross have revealed a ghostly, garbled compositional style influenced »

- David Klein

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Is This a Clip From a Trent Reznor Score or a Household Appliance?

13 October 2014 1:00 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Trent Reznor’s film scores for David Fincher (done in collaboration with Atticus Ross) are famous for turning the noises of modern American life into jagged, dystopian soundscapes, with Reznor’s buzzes and bloops mirroring Fincher’s tales of a society gone rotten. But can you tell the music apart from its inspiration? Take our Trent Reznor quiz below and try to guess if the noise you’re hearing came from one of Reznor’s scores or a modern household appliance. Every time you get one wrong, imagine this face glaring at you. »

- Nate Jones,Abraham Riesman

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Edward Snowden Revealed In Chilling ‘Citizenfour': N.Y. Film Festival

11 October 2014 9:56 AM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Seamless and as darkly riveting as any John le Carré or Graham Greene thriller, Laura PoitrasCitizenfour puts an indelibly human face on Nsa whistleblower Edward Snowden, while ripping away any mask of pretense that the most massive and sophisticated breach of privacy in American history had grounding in reality, let alone the law.

Almost defiantly avoiding most of the technological gimcrackery we’ve come to expect in advocacy filmmaking, and rushed to completion (though never looking it) in time for its world premiere last night at the 52nd New York Film Festival, Citizenfour is likely to open the eyes — not to say change the minds — of doubters who would like to see Snowden tried for treason.

It’s a devastating account of how 9/11 was used to justify the abrogation of civil liberties on an unimaginable, even global scale as the National Security Agency spread a metastasizing net to intercept »

- Jeremy Gerard

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The 5th Annual Hollywood Music in Media Awards Announces Nominees in Film, TV, & Video Games

9 October 2014 3:29 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The Hollywood Music in Media Awards (HMMAs) have announced the nominees in the Visual Media categories.

Showcasing the best and brightest in musical creation for visual media, the 5th Annual Hollywood Music in Media Awards (HMMAs) will be held at The Fonda Theater in Hollywood on Tuesday, November 4, 2014.

The 2014 HMMAs welcome back celebrity hosts including Oscar nominated actor Eric Roberts, former Matchbox 20 member Adam Gaynor, acclaimed Director/Writer/Producer Andy Fickman and Earth, Wind & Fire’s Verdine White. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Education Through Music – Los Angeles (Etmla). Honorees, performers, and special guests to be announced.

The field of entrants were narrowed down to final nominees by the Hmma advisory board and selection committee. The winners will be voted upon by music-media industry professionals comprised of select members of the Society of Composers and Lyricists (Scl), The Television Academy, the AMPAS Music Branch, Naras, performing rights organizations, »

- Michelle McCue

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'Guardians,' 'Gone Girl,' 'Interstellar' scores get a jump on awards season

8 October 2014 12:40 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Somehow over the years the Hollywood Music in Media Awards have escaped me. The event's fifth annual slate of nominees were announced today, and it's a pretty standard assortment of names we've been considering at the forefront of this year's Best Original Score Oscar race, from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross to Hans Zimmer to the ubiquitous Alexandre Desplat. The nominees were chosen by an "Hmma advisory board and selection committee," and winners will be voted upon by "music-media industry professionals comprised of select members of the Society of Composers and Lyricists, The Television Academy, the AMPAS Music Branch, Naras, performing rights organizations, film music journalists and music executives," according to the press release. You might raise your eyebrow at something like "Interstellar" being on here when it hasn't been screened for these purposes (or much at all, for that matter). The nominations are also based on hearing music via »

- Kristopher Tapley

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‘Gone Girl’ Review

8 October 2014 5:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Neil Patrick Harris, Tyler Perry, Carrie Coon, Kim Dickens, Patrick Fugit, David Clennon, Lisa Banes, Missi Pyle, Emily Ratajkowski, Casey Wilson, Sela Ward | Written by Gillian Flynn | Directed by David Fincher

When you control perception you control reality. You become a submerged rudder that secretly steers opinion to your desired location, while society is unaware that their destination was predetermined by an outside source. David Fincher’s latest film Gone Girl emerges itself in the gratuitous glory of playing with this idea.  Fincher has crafted a well-dressed B-movie that takes hitchcockian thrills and adds the right pinch of social commentary.  Gone Girl is a mystery thriller in every sense of the word, but it doesn’t stop there—it is clearly after more.

Fincher is once again adapting an acclaim novel, but this time he gets an assist from screenwriter Gillian Flynn who is also responsible for penning the novel. »

- Dan Clark

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15 great scores from rockers turned film composers

7 October 2014 2:47 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

With "Gone Girl" in theaters, your ears are being treated to yet another untraditional feat of film music composition from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. It's their third collaboration with director David Fincher, and maybe their most intriguing. We talked to Reznor recently and hope to go even deeper on the work later in the season, but for now, let's consider the tradition his and Ross' contribution joins. From the moment sound and image collided in cinema, the entire medium was on a crash course with popular music. Soon enough, merely using pre-existing songs transitioned to filmmakers tapping musical acts, rock or otherwise, for actual score composition. The lineage is rich and intriguing and, more to the point, ever evolving (witness Jay Z's collaboration with Baz Luhrmann on "The Great Gatsby" last year). With Reznor and Ross' latest work in theaters, and with other individuals like Mark Mothersbaugh, Jonny Greenwood »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Box Office Democracy: Gone Girl & Annabelle

7 October 2014 3:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Gone Girl

David Fincher is a fantastic director who has spent most of his career making movies I don’t particularly care for. Not because they’re bad but just because I’m not interested in the story he’s telling. I wasn’t interested in The Social Network, I had no patience for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, and I never quite got swept in the madness for The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Panic Room was the last film that I was truly excited for and even then I waited for it to be on cable. I’m back in the fold in a big was now though, Gone Girl is an exceptional film and a worthy kick-off to awards season.

First and foremost, a director is responsible for getting the best performances out of his actors and the performances in Gone Girl are superb all the way around. »

- Arthur Tebbel

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Trent Reznor wanted his 'Gone Girl' score to sound artificially insincere

6 October 2014 9:17 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

New York — Trent Reznor might still be slightly uncomfortable with this whole movie composer thing. Even after earning an Academy Award and a Grammy Award with Atticus Ross for their "Social Network" and "Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" scores, respectively, it's clear this was not a career path he imagined transitioning into. The 49-year-old musician best known as the face of the industrial rock band Nine Inch Nails has David Fincher to thank for this unexpected bounty and now Reznor and Ross have re-teamed with the iconic director for his latest critically acclaimed thriller, "Gone Girl." Speaking to HitFix the day after the film opened the New York Film Festival in last month, Reznor described his film scoring career as "incredibly rewarding" and admitted he was initially intimidated when they began working on "The Social Network." The process since that Best Picture nominee hasn't changed much. Like many filmmakers, Fincher »

- Gregory Ellwood

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Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ Score is as Mysterious as the Plot of ‘Gone Girl’

6 October 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl” opens with a quote from Tony Kushner’s “The Illusion” saying, “Love is the world’s infinite mutability.” David Fincher’s film adaptation also begins with this idea of mutability as he shows us dampened images of the Missouri landscape while Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ score whispers against it through moderate instrumentation. This subtle and underplayed approach to the music gives the feeling that you are embarking on a slow burn of a journey – which is exactly what happens in the novel and the film. As Gone Girl begins, Reznor and Ross’ music gives a pulse to the toned down, almost bleak surroundings we’re seeing, but never overpowers them. It’s this balance of having the music present while not overly influencing what’s happening on screen that makes Reznor and Ross’ score so successful. Gone Girl is a twisted, turn-filled story of a marriage gone sour that slowly reveals »

- Allison Loring

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Gone Girl's Ending Is Different From The Book In These Specific Ways

6 October 2014 6:35 AM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

As Gone Girl rolled through production, there was talk about director David Fincher and screenwriter Gillian Flynn tinkering with (and possibly changing) the ending to the author.s best-selling novel. Ben Affleck, in interviews, described it as a complete rewrite of the story.s third act. Fincher, meanwhile, sort of backpedaled on that statement, saying it was taken out of context, and that his ending didn.t change "the marrow of the creature," only altered "the bone structure and the muscles and the skin." Ok. Grisly, but okay. So, who is right? Millions of you flocked to Gone Girl over the weekend, and you saw Fincher.s ending. How does it differ from Gillian Flynn.s book? Let.s discuss, in great, spoilery detail, after listening to Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. haunting Gone Girl score. Still reading? We.re going to get spoilery. You have been warned. Ok, so, »

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Exclusive: 'Gone Girl' Stars Rosamund Pike and Neil Patrick Harris Discuss That Big Scene (Spoilers)

6 October 2014 4:58 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

First off: a giant spoiler warning. Seriously: if you haven't seen "Gone Girl," David Fincher's brilliant new thriller (and box office champ), then head back now. Seriously. Consider this the biggest spoiler warning you can stomach. If you read beyond this paragraph, it's your own damn fault.

So one of the biggest, most memorable sequences in "Gone Girl" is the murder of one Desi Collings (Neil Patrick Harris) at the hands (and one very sharp blade) of Amy Elliot-Dunne (Rosamund Pike). It's a shocking sequence, for sure, with Harris fountaining blood from his neck and Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross turning up the intensity on their immaculate score to the point that it reaches nearly Marion Crane-in-the-shower levels of nerve-shredding fury.

When we sat down with Harris and Pike last weekend, we had to get their thoughts on what it was like to shoot this sequence -- and »

- Drew Taylor

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Trent Reznor on How He Made the 'Gone Girl' Score "Rot Inside"

5 October 2014 10:24 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

It's hard not to get chills as soon as the Gone Girl soundtrack kicks in, and that's exactly what the composers were going for. Trent Reznor, who wrote the hit thriller's score with Atticus Ross, told CBS News that he immersed himself in the film's world as much as possible during his writing process. "In this case, [I] read the book, read the script, spent a lot of time with [director] David [Fincher] thinking about asking him what he was looking for," Reznor said. Read more Box Office Analysis: How Middle America Couples Played a Surprise Role in 'Gone Girl' Victory Fincher wanted

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- Ryan Gajewski

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Movie Review – Gone Girl (2014)

5 October 2014 2:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Gone Girl, 2014.

Directed by David Fincher

Starring Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Neil Patrick Harris, Tyler Perry, Carrie Coon, Emily Ratajkowski and Kim Dickens.

Synopsis:

With his wife’s disappearance having become the focus of an intense media circus, a man sees the spotlight turned on him when it’s suspected that he may not be innocent.

The less you know going into David Fincher’s (Seven, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo) Gone Girl, the more you will appreciate the experience. To put that statement into perspective, there are many aspects of Gone Girl that I would love to praise in this review, but can’t because it either involves spoilers or would be a dead giveaway to some critical plot points. What you’ve seen in the trailers mostly consists of just the first 30-45 minutes of the film; yeah, the remaining two hours are full of that many twists and turns. »

- Robert Kojder

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From 'Psycho' to 'Gone Girl': the best director/composer teams

5 October 2014 7:54 AM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

With this weekend's release of Gone Girl, director David Fincher has once again showcased the unsettling sounds of award-winning composers Atticus Ross and Trent Reznor (above). Ever since 2010's The Social Network, the duo have become a fixture of Fincher's work. The duo's deceptively minimal sound, with subtle motifs barely hiding cold electronic undercurrents, is remarkably well-suited for Fincher's trademark visual aesthetic, in which every smile and doorway can take on an air of menace if the camera lingers long enough. While he has worked with a number of composers before—most notably Howard ShoreFincher has found »

- Joshua Rivera

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Perceiving the truth and reality in ‘Gone Girl’

4 October 2014 11:12 AM, PDT | BuzzFocus.com | See recent BuzzFocus.com news »

What do you think of those couples who celebrate the anniversary years by giving traditional gifts to each other. You know what I’m talking about. Paper for year one, cotton for year two, china for 20, silver for 25 and so forth? It’s kind of annoying, right? Gone Girl looks at one of those couples, Nick (Ben Affleck) and Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike) who are about to celebrate their 5th Anniversary (wood) with scavenger hunts involved no less.

He is a former journalist in New York City who lost his job and relocated them to North Carthage, Missouri when his mother went ill. She comes from a well-to-do family, made wealthy by a trust fund set up by parents who mined her childhood for a series of children’s books. Nick visits his twin sister Margo (Carrie Coon) at the bar they both run, discussing some lost enthusiasm for what »

- Ernie Estrella

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Music in Film: Gone Girl, Reznor and Fincher's musical marriage

3 October 2014 8:42 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The arrival of Gone Girl prompts Ivan to take a listen back to the impeccable soundtracks in David Fincher's earlier movies...

"I am officially in control of our story… Isn't that what every marriage is, anyway?"

That's Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) in Gone Girl. A dark satire on marriage, it's a film that recasts human relationships as a battle of control, perfection and perception. In other words, it's a natural fit for David Fincher - and his soundtrack is equally at home.

It perhaps seems harsh to call it Fincher's soundtrack, especially given that the score is composed by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, but it also feels apt. The director is renowned for his auteur-like attention to detail, recording take after take of even the shortest shot to get the desired result for the audience's eyes - and he's just as meticulous when it comes to the ears. »

- ryanlambie

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

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