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Biography

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Overview (1)

Date of Birth 13 April 1957Bay Shore, Long Island, New York, USA

Mini Bio (1)

Amy Goodman was born on April 13, 1957 in Bay Shore, Long Island, New York, USA. She is a producer, known for Are We Still the Ugly American? (2008), Crude (2009) and Split: A Divided America (2008).

Trivia (12)

Majored in Anthropology at Harvard University.
Awarded a George Polk Award in 1999 for her work on "Drilling and Killing."
In 1991, she was nearly killed while reporting on Indonesia's occupation in East Timor. The story won several awards including Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Prize and an Alfred I. DuPont/Columbia Silver Baton. She and her colleague, Allan Nairn, are officially banned from East Timor.
She and her colleague, Allan Nairn, are officially banned from East Timor.
Daughter of a physician from Bayshore, New York.
Graduated from Harvard in 1984.
In 1996, she started "Democracy Now!" as a daily newsmagazine, which is now broadcast through Pacifica Radio.
Sister of David Goodman.
Declined acceptance of her award at the Overseas Press Club awards dinner in Niger when the club's board (which included Tom Brokaw) declared that keynote speaker, Secretary of State Richard Holbrooke, would not have to answer any questions. Holbrooke gave a speech and noted that American bombers had just hit a Serbian television station. After Holbrooke stood up and informed his audience that the US military had bombed a Serbian television station, she told Brokow, "Thank you, but no thank you" and refused to accept the award.
Started her career in radio in 1985 at Pacifica Radio's WBAI station in New York.
Was the first journalist ever allowed in the Peru prison where American political prisoner Lori Berenson was being held.
Traveled to East Timor in the early 90s with her colleague Alan Nairn. They were expecting to report on the Portuguese delegates who were scheduled to go to East Timor. They had also planned to investigate the human rights situation during the Indonesian occupation. The Timorese were protesting in the street when they learned that the delegation had canceled the visit. The Indonesian military later opened fire on the Timorese; Goodman believes that she and Nairn were not shot because the Indonesians were using weapons supplied by the American government. Their experiences were the foundation for the documentary Massacre: The Story of East Timor (2002).

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