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Australia's best cinematographers gear up for industry's night of nights

Stephen Page and Bonnie Elliott on location (photo credit: Jacob Nash).

Australia.s best DPs are gearing up for the 46th National awards for Cinematography, to be held at Nsw Parliament House this Saturday, May 6.

Again hosted by Ray Martin, the awards will recognize work across 18 categories — student projects, documentary, music videos, TV news and the return of the kids category, CineKids.

.We.re trying to encourage primary-school children up to the age of 15 to get involved, and these kids are coming along in leaps and bounds,. says Acs president Ron Johanson. .I think we have 30-40 members all around Australia — these fantastically talented young kids..

Last year.s expo will not be repeated, says Johanson. .We spoke to the sponsors and they felt they.d give it a miss this year because it.s close to Smpte, so we.ll probably have one next year..

Instead the Acs is
See full article at IF.com.au »

Australia's best cinematographers gear up for their night of nights

Stephen Page and Bonnie Elliott on location (photo credit: Jacob Nash).

Australia.s best DPs are gearing up for the 46th National awards for Cinematography, to be held at Nsw Parliament House this Saturday, May 6.

Again hosted by Ray Martin, the awards will recognize work across 18 categories — student projects, documentary, music videos, TV news and the return of the kids category, CineKids.

.We.re trying to encourage primary-school children up to the age of 15 to get involved, and these kids are coming along in leaps and bounds,. says Acs president Ron Johanson. .I think we have 30-40 members all around Australia — these fantastically talented young kids..

Last year.s expo will not be repeated, says Johanson. .We spoke to the sponsors and they felt they.d give it a miss this year because it.s close to Smpte, so we.ll probably have one next year..

Instead the Acs is
See full article at IF.com.au »

Russell Boyd on 'Hacksaw' meeting and Peter Weir's next feature 'The Keep'

Russell Boyd (r) with Peter Weir (l) shooting Master and Commander.

On May 6, the Acs National Awards for Cinematography will be held at Nsw Parliament House, the 46th edition of the annual awards..

This year, the work of the nominees was judged by a panel of five Acs members — president Ron Johanson plus Russell Boyd, Anna Howard, Ernie Clark and Andrew Taylor — over a three-day period..

Feature nominees this year include Denson Baker (The Dark Horse), Andrew Commis (The Daughter), Katie Milwright (Looking for Grace) and Bonnie Elliott (Spear).

Judging feature work can be a tricky proposition, says Boyd. .We.re there to judge the cinematography, not the story or the direction, although that can influence your decisions..

Boyd may be a veteran, with credits ranging from The Last Wave to Liar Liar, but he has well and truly embraced the digital revolution. .I really only shoot commercials these days and they.re all digital,
See full article at IF.com.au »

[Tiff Review] The Rehearsal

After a 17-year hiatus from directing feature length films, Alison Maclean returns to the screen with The Rehearsal, an adaptation of Eleanor Catton‘s acclaimed 2008 novel. On its surface, it looks like other films in a specific, youthful sub-genre that rarely produces particularly insightful or interesting dramas. However, its visual precision elicits a unique mood that elevates the film from the normal, self-important teenage tale.

The most fascinating moments play out as we’re shown the inner workings of the fine arts academy that Maclean places us in. The Head of Acting, Hannah (played masterfully by Kerry Fox) commands a lot from her young students in terms of acting prowess and also building an intimate, familial environment in the institute. This is examined through intense and personal acting classes interspersed throughout the greater narrative. Maclean works with cinematographer Andrew Commis to make these scenes feel claustrophobic and weighty while also
See full article at The Film Stage »

Girl Asleep director Rosemary Myers jumps from theatre to film

Tilda Cobham-Hervey in Girl Asleep (photo credit: Shane Reid).

I know this was originally a piece of theatre; what made you want to adapt it for the screen?

When we made the play we always knew we were going to make the film. The play is a standalone play, but it was a great chance to test the story out really thoroughly and learn about the storytelling before we shot the film.

Why did you decide to write a play to make a film?

We were doing a trilogy of works for teenagers in the Adelaide Festival, and Katrina [Sedgwick] and Amanda [Duthie] had seen some of that work and thought it would be a very interesting audience to make a Hive project for. The writer Matthew Whittet and I were in the very first Hive workshop. We started developing it as a film, pitched it to the Hive and we knew
See full article at IF.com.au »

Berlin Film Review: ‘Girl Asleep’

Berlin Film Review: ‘Girl Asleep’
Wide awake to the wonder, terror and giddy confusion of being a 14-year-old adolescent in 1970s Australia — or anywhere at any time, for that matter — Rosemary Myers’ “Girl Asleep” is a strange, savvy, big-hearted teen adventure that feels perfectly pitched to its target audience as well as those of all ages in search of something unquestionably unique. In the wake of the film’s high-profile European premiere on opening night of the Berlinale’s Generation 14plus program, like-minded sidebars at fests will come calling, with positive word of mouth and laudatory critical attention rousing sales.

On the eve of her 15th birthday, settling into a new suburb and enduring the garish uniforms of a new school, Greta Driscoll (Bethany Whitmore, an embryonic Terri Garr with freckles) has a lot on her plate and even more on her mind. Alone in the schoolyard, she is immediately befriended by the frizzy-haired and loquacious Elliott (Harrison Feldman,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlin: Memento’s Artscope Acquires Berlin Generation 14plus Opener ‘Girl Asleep’ (Exclusive)

Berlin: Memento’s Artscope Acquires Berlin Generation 14plus Opener ‘Girl Asleep’ (Exclusive)
Artscope, Paris-based Memento Film Intl.’s new talent label, has acquired international sales rights to “Girl Asleep,” the Australian rites-of-passage fantasy drama that opens Berlin’s 2016 Generation 14plus, one of the festival’s biggest sidebars.

The first feature of Rosemary Myers, the artistic director of Adelaide’s Windmill Theatre, comedy-laced “Girl Asleep” hits Berlin with a good buzz off its world premiere at the Adelaide Film Festival where its screenings were the fastest selling film in the festival’s 13-year-old history. “Girl Asleep” went on to win the Aff’s 2015 Foxtel Movies Audience Award.

Set in a vintage brown-and-yellow ‘70s Australia of flared trousers, laden timber décor and eye-popping colored wallpaper, “Girl Asleep” plumbs the contradictory, wrenching and often downright excruciating daily and fantasy life of near-15 Greta Driscoll, kicking off with her first day at a new school, befriended by the class nerd and picked upon by the school bitches.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Critical acclaim for festival premieres

The launches of Matt Saville.s A Month of Sundays and Simon Stone.s The Daughter at international film festivals are paying off with critical acclaim for both.

Saville.s dramedy, which stars Anthony Lapaglia as a real estate agent whose life takes an unexpected turn when he receives a call from his dead mother, sending him on a journey of redemption, premiered in the contemporary world cinema section of the Toronto International Film Festival.

Stone.s re-imagining of Ibsen.s The Wild Duck, which features Geoffrey Rush, Sam Neill, Ewen Leslie, Paul Schneider, Anna Torv, Miranda Otto and newcomer Odessa Young, which had its world premiere at the Sydney Film Festival,. screened at the Venice Film Festival.s Venice Days followed by its North American premiere at Tiff.s special presentations sidebar.

The Hollywood Reporter.s Jordan Mintzer hailed A Month of Sundays as a .modest, warm hearted character
See full article at IF.com.au »

Film Review: ‘The Daughter’

Film Review: ‘The Daughter’
Deeply involving and emotionally searing, “The Daughter” reps a confident and profoundly moving bigscreen debut for established theater director Simon Stone. Those familiar with Henrik Ibsen’s play, which Stone freely adapted for the Sydney stage in 2011, will find its themes of the haunted past detonating in the present and the gulfs in class and gender fully intact. Yet Stone’s radical retooling of the story details, characters and setting has yielded something urgent and new, and the low-key, naturalistic approach to his direction of a fine cast — a rare tonal quality in contempo Australian drama — should ensure busy international fest play and the rapt attention of distribs seeking quality fare.

In an unnamed, present-day logging town that has seen better times, Henry Neilson (Geoffrey Rush), a well-to-do mill owner who’s aloof to the point of arrogance, announces to his employees that the economy has forced him to close.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Acs salutes The Railway Man, Lesnie

  • IF.com.au
The Railway Man.s Garry Phillips won the Gold Tripod for best feature at the Australian Cinematographers Society (Acs) national awards, an event dedicated to the memory of Andrew Lesnie. Phillips also got the Acs.s highest honour, the Milli Award, for which all Golden Tripod recipients were eligible.

Ben Nott received an award of distinction in the feature category for Predestination. Adam Arkapaw.s True Detectives episode 4 was feted for best telefeature, miniseries, TV drama or comedy, and Andrew Commis got the award. of distinction for Devil's Playground. Best dramatised documentary was Jim Frater.s The War That Changed Us episode 1. Joel Lawrence won the best international news award for Tsunami Anniversary. The audience at the awards, which were presented on Saturday night at Moma, stood for a minute's silence for Oscar-winner Lesnie, 59, who died last Monday. . National president Ron Johanson said, .We need to acknowledge the love and
See full article at IF.com.au »

Tie for best film at Fcca Awards

Ivan Sen.s Mystery Road and Kim Mordaunt.s The Rocket shared the best film honours at the Film Critics Circle of Australia Awards presented last night.

The Great Gatsby collected four awards followed by The Rocket with 3 and Mystery Road and The Turning with 2 awards each.

Naomi Watts was named best actress for her role in the little-seen Adoration and Aaron Pedersen was best actor for Mystery Road. Sen was best director.

There was another tie for the supporting actor prize: The Great Gatsby.s Joel Edgerton and Mystery Road.s Hugo Weaving. The Turning.s Rose Byrne was best supporting actress. The Rocket.s Sitthiphon Disamoe was on hand to receive the gong for best young performer.

Best script award went to The Railway Man.s Frank Cottrell Boyce and Andy Paterson. Haydn Keenan's Persons of Interest was named best documentary.

An Acknowledgment Award was presented to
See full article at IF.com.au »

Oz critics laud Mystery Road

Ivan Sen.s Mystery Road. won six of the eight awards for Australian films at the Australian Film Critics Association 2014 film and writing awards.

The murder mystery produced by David Jowsey was feted as best film and for Sen.s direction, screenplay and cinematography, lead actor Aaron Pedersen and supporting actor Hugo Weaving.

Nicole Kidman was named best actress for The Railway Man and Rose Byrne took the supporting actress prize for Tim Winton's The Turning.

Tarantino's Django Unchanged was judged best international film and Michael Haneke.s Amour best foreign-language international film. Best documentary went to Sarah Polley.s Stories We Tell.

The Afca has about 75 members. .All our members voted on the Awards and the majority clearly felt Ivan Sen's gripping outback noir was the best Australian film from the last 12 months,. said Afca chair Richard Haridy, whose outlets are ABC Radio Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast,
See full article at IF.com.au »

Baz's creative team cleans up at Aacta Awards

The Great Gatsby dominated. Aacta.s technical and short films awards today, collecting gongs in all six craft categories for which it was nominated, plus the Aacta award for outstanding achievement in visual effects.

The co-production Top of the Lake bagged two TV trophies while Matchbox Pictures. Nowhere Boys, created by Tony Ayres, was named best children.s TV series.

The TV documentary prize went to Redesign My Brain, which explores the revolutionary new science of brain plasticity, written and directed by Paul Scott and produced by Isabel Perez and Scott for ABC TV.

Writer-director Nick Verso's The Last Time I Saw Richard, produced by John Molloy, was honoured as best short fiction film. Developed and funded through Screen Australia.s Springboard program, the short is a prequel to the upcoming feature film Boys In The Trees, tracing the friendship between two teenagers in a mental health clinic in
See full article at IF.com.au »

Review: Kim Mordaunt's Australian Oscar Submission 'The Rocket,' a Primitivist Parable with Anti-Corporate Message (Trailer)

Review: Kim Mordaunt's Australian Oscar Submission 'The Rocket,' a Primitivist Parable with Anti-Corporate Message (Trailer)
There’s some seductively primeval scenery decorating Aussie director Kim Mordaunt’s “The Rocket,” which is Australia's Oscar entry, if only because its setting -- Laos -- has so seldom appeared on western screens. The film opens in New York City on January 10 and in Los Angeles on January 17 at the Nuart Theatre.Stirring landscapes, however -- and the occasional flash of cinematographic virtuosity from Dp Andrew Commis -- will only get you so far, something Mordaunt obviously knows, as he goes about creating a primitivist parable with an anti-corporate message replete with plucky preteens, a James Brown impersonator, ripely symbolic mangoes, unexploded landmines and a tone that roams from Italian post-war neo-realism (think an Asian “Stromboli”) to the magical conjuring of that elusive Vietnamese genius, Tranh Anh Hung. However: Mordaunt makes a more than adept fiction debut with a story that picks scabs off a number of sore subjects,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Great Gatsby, The Rocket, Top of the Lake lead Aacta noms

The Great Gatsby has been nominated in 14 categories and The Rocket is in contention for 12 at the third annual Australian Academy of Cinema & Television Arts Awards.

In TV, Top of the Lake top scored with 10 nominations ahead of eight apiece for Mrs Biggs, Power Games: The Packer- Murdoch Story and Redfern Now series 2.

Gatsby and The Rocket are vying for best film with Dead Europe, Mystery Road, Satellite Boy and Tim Winton.s The Turning.

A total of 50 productions has been nominated across 39 awards categories. The Nsw Government announced today it would renew its partnership agreement for a further three years, from 2015-2017.

Aacta has signed a three-year deal with Foxtel which entails pay-tv rights and further collaborations. Aacta/AFI CEO Damian Trewhella tells If that in future years this may take the form of deeper coverage on Foxtel before or after the awards, spotlighting creative talent.

The Gatsby remake
See full article at IF.com.au »

La Juala De Oro and Katiyabaaz bag top honors at 15th Mumbai Film Festival

With a promise to be back next year, bigger and better, the final day of the 15th Mumbai Film Festival presented by Reliance Entertainment and organized by the Mumbai Academy of Moving Images (Mami) unfolded.

After a week of celebrating cinema, the final few films screened today included Red Wedding directed by Guillaume Suon and Lida Chan, Short Term 12 by Destin Cretton, Saving General Yang directed by Ronny Yu, Hiroshi Toda’s Seventh Cat, Five Years by Stefan Schaller, Costa Gavras’s Amen and the much acclaimed Z, A Few Days More by Om Prakash Srivastava among others.

The last of the 15th Mumbai Film Festival’s master classes was conducted by the legendary director Bruce Beresford, on Preparation by the Director. “I thought I would talk about the necessity of story boarding. These days, with tight budgets and short schedules, if you don’t plan them, you’ll
See full article at Bollyspice »

Golden Dream, Fandry win in Mumbai

  • ScreenDaily
Golden Dream, Fandry win in Mumbai
Diego Quemada-Diez scoops top prize; Nagraj Manjule wins jury award.Scroll down for full list of winners

Mexican film A Golden Dream (La Jaula De Oro) scooped the top prize, the Golden Gateway Of India award, in the Mumbai Film Festival’s international competition for first features, while Nagraj Manjule’s Fandry was awarded the Jury Grand Prize.

Directed by Diego Quemada-Diez, who started his career as an assistant to Ken Loach, A Golden Dream (fka The Golden Cage)follows the journey of three young Guatemalans attempting to emigrate to the Us.

The film debuted at Cannes in May where it won the Talent award in the Un Certain Regard section. It recently won the Best International Feature Film at the Zurich Film Festival.

The only Indian film in competition, the Marathi-language Fandry revolves around an “untouchable” or Dalit boy and his love for a girl from a higher caste.

Anthony Chen’s [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Golden Cage, Fandry win in Mumbai

  • ScreenDaily
Golden Cage, Fandry win in Mumbai
Diego Quemada-Diez scoops top prize; Nagraj Manjule wins jury award.Scroll down for full list of winners

Mexican film The Golden Cage (La Jaula De Oro) scooped the top prize, the Golden Gateway Of India award, in the Mumbai Film Festival’s international competition for first features, while Nagraj Manjule’s Fandry was awarded the Jury Grand Prize.

Directed by Diego Quemada-Diez, who started his career as an assistant to Ken Loach, The Golden Cage follows the journey of three young Guatemalans attempting to emigrate to the Us.

The film debuted at Cannes in May where it won the Talent award in the Un Certain Regard section. It recently won the Best International Feature Film at the Zurich Film Festival.

The only Indian film in competition, the Marathi-language Fandry revolves around an “untouchable” or Dalit boy and his love for a girl from a higher caste.

Anthony Chen’s Ilo Ilo continued its successful festival
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Mumbai Fest Crowns ‘Jaula de Ora,’ ‘Powerless’

Mumbai Fest Crowns ‘Jaula de Ora,’ ‘Powerless’
Hong Kong – The Mexican film “La Jaula de Oro” was named as the best international film at the close of the 15th edition of the Mumbai Film Festival on Thursday. The Silver Gateway of India trophy was awarded to “Fandry,” directed by Nagraj Manjule (pictured with Bruce Beresford,) as the best Indian film.

In the separate India Gold competition, documentary “Powerless” was named best film, with “Qissa: The Tale of a Lonely Ghost,” directed by Anup Singh as runner up. Manju Borah’s “Ko:yad” (A Silent Way) received a special jury prize.

Although hampered by budget and sponsorship issues, the festival and its accompanying market this week proved to be very honorable attempts to engage the often separate Indian and international cinema sectors in each other.

The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences used it as the platform to move its “Digital Dilemma” campaign on digital film archiving to India.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Fandry, Katiyabaaz, Qissa among winners at Mumbai Film Festival 2013

Fandry, Katiyabaaz, Qissa among winners at Mumbai Film Festival 2013
Marathi-language film Fandry directed by Nagraj Manjule won the Jury Grand Prize for the Second best film in International Competition at the 15th Mumbai Film Festival which concluded on Thursday. The film won a Silver Gateway trophy and a cash prize of ₹25 lakhs. [Read Nagraj Manjule's interview]

La Jaula de Oro (The Golden Cage) won the Best Film (Golden Gateway award) in International section.

Katiyabaaz (Powerless) by Fahad Mustafa and Deepti Kakkar won the Best Film (Golden Gateway award) in the India Gold Category while Qissa directed by Anup Singh won the Silver Gateway Award for Second Best film. Ko:Yad (A silent way) won the Silver Gateway Special Jury Award in the India Gold category.

Anthony Chen won the Best Director award for Ilo Ilo. Yan Yann Yeo won the Best Actor (Female) award for the same film.

Vincent Macaigne won the Best Actor award for his performance in the French film Tonnerre.

Cinematographer of The Rocket,
See full article at DearCinema.com »
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