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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

7 items from 2017


Q&A: Stephan Franck on the Kickstarter Campaign for Volume 3 of His Vampire Graphic Novel Series Silver

11 July 2017 2:13 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

For a group of con men and a descendant of Van Helsing, robbing Dracula's castle could be the score they need to be set for life, but things get complicated when vampires stand in their way of a big payday in Stephan Franck's graphic novel series Silver. With Dark Planet Comics launching a Kickstarter campaign for Silver Volume 3, we had the chance to catch up with Franck for our latest Q&A feature to discuss the influences of Bram Stoker's Dracula on his work, what readers can expect to see in Volume 3, and much more.

Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions for us today, Stephan. When and how did you first come up with the idea for Silver?

Stephan Franck: It’s my pleasure, thank you for having me. Two of my greatest fascinations in story have always been vampires and conmen, and this notion »

- Derek Anderson

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Whoa Is Me: Keanu Reeves’ Saddest Roles, From ‘My Own Private Idaho’ to ‘John Wick’

9 July 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

We’ve all seen the Sad Keanu memes, and a number of details from the “Point Break” and “Matrix” star’s biography do indeed point toward tragedy. The actor is known for thrilling us rather than saddening us nevertheless, not that there aren’t a few exceptions to prove the rule (even if none of them involve him eating a sandwich on his lonesome).

With “To the Bone” premiering on Netflix this Friday, take a moment to relive some of Keanu’s saddest performances.

My Own Private Idaho

Maybe it’s the fact that he’s acting opposite River Phoenix, a friend who died just two years after Gus Van Sant’s early classic was released, but it’s hard not to feel for Keanu in “My Own Private Idaho.” A soon-to-be-wealthy heir, his Scott is always looking after his narcoleptic best friend (Phoenix, whose character is also in love »

- Michael Nordine

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‘Dracula’: 7 Things A Series About the World’s Most Famous Vampire Should Have

23 June 2017 1:24 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It was recently announced that Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat, the creators behind the hit BBC series “Sherlock,” have signed on to write a new TV adaptation of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula.” Fan reactions have been mixed — some remaining hopeful that Gatiss and Moffat will pull the age-old story off, while others have expressed their lack of faith in the writing pair’s ability to keep the integrity of the story and its characters.

Read More: ‘Sherlock’ Review: ‘The Final Problem’ Proves to Be A Problematic Season Finale

While maybe a bit harsh, these concerns aren’t unjustified — Dracula-centered television shows are notoriously short-lived, and while there are a multitude of shows centered around the supernatural, there aren’t that many dedicated to the main vamp himself. NBC took a stab at it in 2013 with “Dracula,” a British-American horror drama that introduces Dracula as he arrives in London and poses as an entrepreneur who wants to bring modern science to Victorian society (when in reality, he’s arrived to wreak revenge on the people who ruined his life centuries earlier). Though promising, the series only lasted one season.  

Dracula was first introduced in Bram Stoker’s Gothic horror novel “Dracula.” The story reads as a series of letters, diary entries, news articles, and ships’ log entries that document the activity and evidence of a Transylvanian vampire in England; filled with mystery, blood sucking, and plenty of garlic, it’s one of the novels that helped kick-start the future surplus of vampire dramas, horrors, and romances that we see today.

One of the reasons that “Dracula”-based shows may not be inherently successful is that the shows don’t seem to capture the essence of who Dracula really is. So we’ve put together a few suggestions for the future series, most of which involve getting back to basics.

1. Fangs

The classic “Dracula” story included terrifying fangs, ones that Dracula showed off well. But in the midst of all of the modern reboots of “Dracula,” many writers/directors decided that subtlety was more important than authenticity. If we’re looking for ways to incorporate Dracula’s fangs into 21st Century fashion, just think of them as a statement piece.

2. The Era

While all of the modern adaptations of “Dracula” and vampires in general have been interesting, it’s time to get back to its roots. The story of “Dracula” originally took place in the 1890s in England, so the new “Dracula” series should do the same. It would be a breath of fresh air after all of the recent modern retellings. Plus, who doesn’t love a good slick back and a cape? No one, that’s who.

3. Tell the Original Story

While a lot of vampire stories have spawned from the original “Dracula,” there haven’t been nearly as many that actually tell Dracula’s story. Bring back characters like Jonathan Harker and Van Helsing! They don’t have to share the spotlight with Dracula, but they’re relatively new characters to the younger generation, and they would help inspire interesting plot points for the new show (something the previous “Dracula” series lacked).

4. Bring Back the Blood — Real Blood

While the premise of “vegetarian” vampires is intriguing, the new “Dracula” series would be better off just sticking to the classic “lust for human blood” angle. It’s what makes the character and story so morally conflicted — the fact that you know it’s wrong to murder but also understand that Dracula is a creature of the undead and has to prey on humans for sustenance. It also makes things more tense, and that makes for interesting content.

5. Make Dracula a Bit Ruthless

Rumor has it that Dracula was based off of Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia, better known as Vlad the Impaler. It’s said that Vlad Dracula (meaning son of the dragon, or son of the devil) would dip chunks of bread into buckets of blood drained from the people he killed, usually after he invited them to a feast and then immediately impaled them at the dinner table (he always finished his dinner afterwards, bodies and all, in case you were wondering). So it would be nice if that same sense of ruthlessness could be brought to the new adaptation of “Dracula.” There’s no rule that states you can’t be suave and merciless (just ask Klaus Mikaelson of “The Vampire Diaries” and “The Originals”).

6. Give Him a Sense of Humor

Speaking of “The Originals,” let’s bring in some of that dark humor and wit that makes characters like Klaus Mikaelson a baddie that we love to hate (but just can’t). That same natural charisma and use of offhanded sardonic remarks should be applied to our newest Dracula, because that’s what the audience connects to. It’s also what keeps people coming back for more, everyone needs a tension breaker once in awhile.

7. Mdha: Make Dracula Hungarian Again!

That is to say, Dracula should not be British, considering Dracula relocated from Transylvania to England and his accent most certainly should have relocated with him. In Bram Stoker’s novel “Dracula,” the Count is described as being Hungarian, and even serves Jonathan Harker a bottle of Tokaji (Hungarian sweet wine) on his first night in the castle. For the sake of authenticity, let’s make Dracula Hungarian again (because he never should have stopped).

Related storiesHow Editing 'The Walking Dead' Helped the 'Midnighters' Director Make His First Horror Film'Alien' Movies, Ranked From Worst To BestThe 20 Best British Horror Films of All Time »

- Gabrielle Kiss

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‘Dracula’: 7 Things A Series About the World’s Most Famous Vampire Should Have

23 June 2017 1:24 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

It was recently announced that Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat, the creators behind the hit BBC series “Sherlock,” have signed on to write a new TV adaptation of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula.” Fan reactions have been mixed — some remaining hopeful that Gatiss and Moffat will pull the age-old story off, while others have expressed their lack of faith in the writing pair’s ability to keep the integrity of the story and its characters.

Read More: ‘Sherlock’ Review: ‘The Final Problem’ Proves to Be A Problematic Season Finale

While maybe a bit harsh, these concerns aren’t unjustified — Dracula-centered television shows are notoriously short-lived, and while there are a multitude of shows centered around the supernatural, there aren’t that many dedicated to the main vamp himself. NBC took a stab at it in 2013 with “Dracula,” a British-American horror drama that introduces Dracula as he arrives in London and poses as an entrepreneur who wants to bring modern science to Victorian society (when in reality, he’s arrived to wreak revenge on the people who ruined his life centuries earlier). Though promising, the series only lasted one season.  

Dracula was first introduced in Bram Stoker’s Gothic horror novel “Dracula.” The story reads as a series of letters, diary entries, news articles, and ships’ log entries that document the activity and evidence of a Transylvanian vampire in England; filled with mystery, blood sucking, and plenty of garlic, it’s one of the novels that helped kick-start the future surplus of vampire dramas, horrors, and romances that we see today.

One of the reasons that “Dracula”-based shows may not be inherently successful is that the shows don’t seem to capture the essence of who Dracula really is. So we’ve put together a few suggestions for the future series, most of which involve getting back to basics.

1. Fangs

The classic “Dracula” story included terrifying fangs, ones that Dracula showed off well. But in the midst of all of the modern reboots of “Dracula,” many writers/directors decided that subtlety was more important than authenticity. If we’re looking for ways to incorporate Dracula’s fangs into 21st Century fashion, just think of them as a statement piece.

2. The Era

While all of the modern adaptations of “Dracula” and vampires in general have been interesting, it’s time to get back to its roots. The story of “Dracula” originally took place in the 1890s in England, so the new “Dracula” series should do the same. It would be a breath of fresh air after all of the recent modern retellings. Plus, who doesn’t love a good slick back and a cape? No one, that’s who.

3. Tell the Original Story

While a lot of vampire stories have spawned from the original “Dracula,” there haven’t been nearly as many that actually tell Dracula’s story. Bring back characters like Jonathan Harker and Van Helsing! They don’t have to share the spotlight with Dracula, but they’re relatively new characters to the younger generation, and they would help inspire interesting plot points for the new show (something the previous “Dracula” series lacked).

4. Bring Back the Blood — Real Blood

While the premise of “vegetarian” vampires is intriguing, the new “Dracula” series would be better off just sticking to the classic “lust for human blood” angle. It’s what makes the character and story so morally conflicted — the fact that you know it’s wrong to murder but also understand that Dracula is a creature of the undead and has to prey on humans for sustenance. It also makes things more tense, and that makes for interesting content.

5. Make Dracula a Bit Ruthless

Rumor has it that Dracula was based off of Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia, better known as Vlad the Impaler. It’s said that Vlad Dracula (meaning son of the dragon, or son of the devil) would dip chunks of bread into buckets of blood drained from the people he killed, usually after he invited them to a feast and then immediately impaled them at the dinner table (he always finished his dinner afterwards, bodies and all, in case you were wondering). So it would be nice if that same sense of ruthlessness could be brought to the new adaptation of “Dracula.” There’s no rule that states you can’t be suave and merciless (just ask Klaus Mikaelson of “The Vampire Diaries” and “The Originals”).

6. Give Him a Sense of Humor

Speaking of “The Originals,” let’s bring in some of that dark humor and wit that makes characters like Klaus Mikaelson a baddie that we love to hate (but just can’t). That same natural charisma and use of offhanded sardonic remarks should be applied to our newest Dracula, because that’s what the audience connects to. It’s also what keeps people coming back for more, everyone needs a tension breaker once in awhile.

7. Mdha: Make Dracula Hungarian Again!

That is to say, Dracula should not be British, considering Dracula relocated from Transylvania to England and his accent most certainly should have relocated with him. In Bram Stoker’s novel “Dracula,” the Count is described as being Hungarian, and even serves Jonathan Harker a bottle of Tokaji (Hungarian sweet wine) on his first night in the castle. For the sake of authenticity, let’s make Dracula Hungarian again (because he never should have stopped).

Related storiesHow Editing 'The Walking Dead' Helped the 'Midnighters' Director Make His First Horror Film'Alien' Movies, Ranked From Worst To BestThe 20 Best British Horror Films of All Time »

- Gabrielle Kiss

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Sherlock creators to produce Dracula miniseries for the BBC

20 June 2017 8:17 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Tony Sokol Jun 20, 2017

Dracula is returning to England. Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat are in talks to produce new series for BBC...

Sherlock creators Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat have detected another classic novel to sink their teeth into. Bram Stoker’s Dracula begins with a real estate deal. Jonathan Harker secures the Transylvanian count some scattered properties in Whitby, England, where he can kick off his cape and hide his native soil. Those hiding places are discovered through some stiff detective work. 127 years after the 1897 publication of the classic horror novel, the quintessential vampire will be returning to England. Moffat and Gatiss are in negotiations with the BBC to create a new Dracula miniseries.

See related  Steven Spielberg's Duel: An Appreciation Top 10 Simon Pegg film and TV roles Zak Penn interview: Atari: Game Over, Ready Player One

Dracula will be the first time Moffat and Gatiss have collaborated since Sherlock aired its long awaited season 4 earlier this year. The future of Sherlock has not yet been decided. Work on the new Dracula series will begin after Moffat finishes his sixth and final season on Doctor Who.

Dracula has been adapted for stage, screen and TV many times. Stoker wrote the first theatrical version. It was first adapted to film by F. W. Murnau in Nosferatu in 1922. Bela Lugosi went from stage to screen when he starred in the 1931 Universal Studios classic. The BBC produced the TV movie Count Dracula, starring Louis Jourdan in 1977.

Gatiss is on record as a fan of the 1958 Hammer Horror version of Dracula, which starred Christopher Lee as the count and Peter Cushing as Dr. Van Helsing. Moffat took on classic horror in 2007 when he wrote the series Jekyll. Gatiss played Dracula in a full-cast audio play from Big Finish in 2016.

There is no word on whether Dracula will be set in modern day England.

Source: Variety »

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Have You Ever Wondered Why Bram Stoker’s Dracula is So Popular?

22 April 2017 5:11 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel Dracula created what is now the most famous bloodsucker in history. The tale of the titular character, Jonathan Harker, his fiancee Mina, and Abraham van Helsing, as well as other characters, has become the foundation for… Continue Reading →

The post Have You Ever Wondered Why Bram Stoker’s Dracula is So Popular? appeared first on Dread Central. »

- Jonathan Barkan

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Fantasy Fridays: Scully & Mfr Cast The Universal Monsters (Frankenstein, Dracula, Wolf Man, More!)

27 January 2017 10:30 AM, PST | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Welcome back to another edition of Fantasy Fridays, where two real-life best friends get to play studio execs and cast talent for upcoming projects. We sort of take the same tact as the old Wizard Magazine features where we choose our dream picks for coveted roles without necessarily being tied down to realistic options. 

With the case of Universal's upcoming Cinematic Universe of Classic Monsters, we thankfully have a very wide palette to choose from since the studio has already secured some surprisingly high-profile talent. So that actually takes some of the "pie in the sky/fantasy" nature out of our picks, since it seems like they're able to get who ever they want to appear in these films.

So far, we've got The Mummy with stars like Tom Cruise and Russell Crowe. Then there's Johnny Depp, who's signed on for The Invisible Man. The sky's the limit for these monster flicks, »

- Mario-Francisco Robles

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

7 items from 2017


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