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‘Woodshock’ Directors on Creating Their Hallucinatory Directorial Debut

Although until now they’ve only been known as fashion designers, cinema has always been part of Kate and Laura Mulleavy’s work. The siblings often use films as inspiration for their collections and have delivered runway shows dedicated to the likes of Japanese horror movie Kuroneko among others, their elaborate, stunning designs are also staples of awards season red carpets with actresses like Kirsten Dunst and Natalie Portman wearing them to festivals and ceremonies. In fact, Portman collected her first Best Actress Oscar in a purple Rodarte gown, after Kate and Laura had designed many of the costumes for Black Swan. After being so immersed in the world of cinema, it seems that making a film was the logical next step, and so they’ve done with Woodshock, a hallucinatory journey into the mind of Theresa (Dunst) a young woman battling depression after the death of her mother.

The
See full article at The Film Stage »

Exclusive Interview – Owen Michael Johnson and John Pearson discuss Beast Wagon

With their critically acclaimed series wrapping up with latest issue, “Finale”, Beast Wagon creators Owen Michael Johnson and John Pearson discuss their unique vision and inspirations…

Like a stampede running rampant in a public zoo, the arrival of Beast Wagon two years ago took comic fans with surprise – and it’s one they won’t soon forget. Surreal, demented, peppered with dark humour and layered with social commentary, Changeling Studios’ bonkers odyssey is not only original, but it’s reflective of the troubling times we’ve faced in recent years – as well as the possible dark period ahead. An effective piece art, Beast Wagon taps into collective fears, anxieties and frustrations felt in the current socio-political climate, while, at the same time, manages to lure us into a world unlike anything else. Bold, thought provoking and wholly original, it’s a must have for any serious comic aficionados collection. Recently,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Navigating Through Bermuda: A Conversation with Jim Jarmusch

  • MUBI
Jim Jarmusch. Photo courtesy of the Lisbon Estoril Film Festival.This interview took place on an auspicious morning after the U.S. elections. The setting was placid: an oceanside terrace in the small casino town of Estoril, twenty minutes outside of Lisbon, where Jim Jarmusch was attending Paulo Branco’s Lisbon Estoril Film Festival. Despite the harrowing mood, the subject was focused and insightful, talking about his working method, collaborators, and the poetic influences and resonances for his latest film, Paterson, which opens in North America this week.Notebook: I wanted to start by talking about technical matters.Jim Jarmusch: Sure.Notebook: I’m curious…do you use a shot list?Jarmusch: No. Because, say, we go to the location, and it’s 4pm, and we’re shooting the next day at 9am… and now the light is coming from a different place, and maybe it rained overnight, and everything’s different.
See full article at MUBI »

Zombie Birdhouse

  • CultureCatch
Keltie Ferris Mitchell-Innes & Nash, NYC Through October 17, 2015

A screenwriter bursts into his agent's office. "I have a great idea for a new picture," he enthuses. "We do a remake of The Wiz. Only with white people!" Clichéd Hollywood joke, sure, yet pretty much on point with regard to current trends in art and music. The mash-up, dub, remix, redux, or whatever you want to call it, has replaced the "appropriation" strategies of the 80s. It has morphed into something called Zombie Formalism that for better, or worse, is now seen as a legitimate art movement.

Mitchell-Innes & Nash is showing the paintings and works on paper of Keltie Ferris. These very large, high-keyed, color-filled canvases are warmly inviting on first viewing. Bright reds and blues dominate. The arching motif is brushy passages of paint, checkerboard squares, and general noodling around with the brush over airbrushed planes of color. The press release notes,
See full article at CultureCatch »

French Institute Alliance Française meets the Tribeca Film Festival by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2015-04-17 10:33:10

Sally Singer with Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Spring Fashion Talks at the French Institute Alliance Française kicked off with Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler, moderated by Creative Digital Director for Vogue, Sally Singer, and crossed paths with the Tribeca Film Festival as the Haute Couture on Film series continued.

Inside the Florence Gould Hall Theater on April 15, while Bao Nguyen's Live from New York! was opening Tribeca at the Beacon Theatre, McCollough and Hernandez were referencing Harmony Korine, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Cate Blanchett, Gerhard Richter, Pearl Jam, Cindy Sherman, Kurt Cobain and, at one point, Sydney Pollack's Out Of Africa, complete with mid-century craftsmanship and mother nature as shaping Proenza Schouler creations. The designers appeared in Fabien Constant's exquisite documentary Mademoiselle C on Carine Roitfeld. Inspiration for them comes mostly from "posture, movement, attitude and spirit.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Filming Africa: Myths and Legends

  • MUBI
35 Cows and a Kalishnokov

What is the bond between a tribe of Ethiopian cattle farmers, dandy gentlemen parading themselves on Brazzaville streets, and the Kinshasan fetish wrestlers who appear in 35 Cows and a Kalishnokov in the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam’s (Idfa) competition this year? To propose a documentary about such a bond, an act of synthesis would be necessary, one which first deconstructs the rites and peoples exhibited, creating a web of meaning that would link the rituals.

Or, as in 35 Cows and a Kalishnokov, one could make a purely aesthetic film whose theoretical basis is but a shared continent, exotic landscapes and black skin. What director Oswold von Richthofen’s documentary offers up to its (inevitably) Western viewers is an image of Africa that is all color and form—rippling musculature, exotic hues, pierced faces, wild cries—regurgitating as always the same Western myth of Africa, a
See full article at MUBI »

Inside the Making of the Spectacular Tesseract in 'Interstellar'

Inside the Making of the Spectacular Tesseract in 'Interstellar'
This is where Matthew McConaughey's Cooper encounters the Tesseract: an artificial construct that allows him to perceive time as a physical dimension. The design and execution was a total collaboration between Nolan, theoretical physicist and exec producer Kip Thorne, the art department led by production designer Nathan Crowley, and VFX studio Double Negative led by co-owner/supervisor Paul Franklin. "We looked at works from Gerhard Richter, who has this technique of scraping the paint across the canvas and leaving these trails, so there's this sense of a historical record," Franklin explains. "The other thing I looked at was slit scan photography, and of, course, the Stargate in '2001,' but it goes back a lot further than that. "Slit scan is this process that records one specific location across a whole range of moments. You have a slit and an aperture and you move the negative behind it so
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Film Review: ‘Dior and I’

Film Review: ‘Dior and I’
Fashion documentaries often suffer from the preconception that pricey clothes are frivolous and therefore unworthy of serious attention, or they’re relegated to the “guilty pleasures” pile. Yet design is about creativity, and the dialogue that designers have between past and present is akin to painters’ influences: the process is intrinsically fascinating. Fast-rising helmer Frederic Tcheng brings out this element and much more in his beautifully crafted “Dior and I,” which follows Raf Simons as he launches his first haute couture collection for Christian Dior in spring 2012. Multilayered, meticulously woven and a model of its kind, the docu deserves a place on specialized screens as well as TV.

Few houses have such a weight of expectation as Dior: From the moment the designer launched his revolutionary “New Look” in 1947, the public idea of Dior has been locked into a very particular guise. When Simons was appointed artistic director of the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Disco Fever … at the Guggenheim?

  • Vulture
Disco Fever … at the Guggenheim?
In the era of museum as theme park, every institution jumps at the chance to play DJ. On Saturday, the Guggenheim turned its Rotunda into an art-house disco with the spacey sounds of Krautrock, all inspired by the overlooked and largely forgotten Düsseldorf disco the Creamcheese Club. Despite its, well, cheesy name (after Frank Zappa’s Suzy Creamcheese), the fringe space served as a hangout hub for everyone and anyone that you would have wanted to meet in post-war Germany: Joseph Beuys, Gerhard Richter, and Binky Palermo (who bartended for a bit) — all of whom exhibited work inside — as well as the Zero Group artists — Günther Uecker founded it, and Heinz Mack designed the bar — and, of course, the Krautrock kings like Neu!, Can, Cluster, and Kraftwerk, who all played many of their formative performances inside the basement bunker (and the latter demonstrated an amazing pull in
See full article at Vulture »

Seeing Out Loud: Saltz on MoMA’s Frustratingly Near-Great Sigmar Polke Retrospective

  • Vulture
The Museum of Modern Art’s sprawling extravagant “Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010” is really good. How could it not be, with more than 260 works by a great artist on hand? When Polke died at 69 in 2010, John Baldessari observed that “Any one [Polke] move can provide a career for a lesser artist.” The Whitney curator Chrissie Iles said, "I don’t like using terms like ‘master,’ but Polke is a master; he knows it, and we know it." I think of him as a Rosetta Stone for young artists, one whose material glee, anarchic inventiveness, and hallucinogenic Blakean imagination puts him in the same influential postwar class with Pollock, Johns, Rauschenberg, Warhol, and his old friend and nemesis Gerhard Richter. He created his own ravishingly visual, impish blends of Pop, Conceptualism, Neo-Dada, Fluxus, Constructivism, and Process Art, all replete with philosophical heft, social bite, and an extraordinary combination of chaos
See full article at Vulture »

2014 Sundance “Trading Cards” Series: #2. David Zellner (Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter)

  • ioncinema
Eric Lavallee: Name me three of your favorite “2013 discoveries”…

David Zellner: 1. Seeing Viva Maria! in 35mm. That movie is pure joy. 2. Gerhard Richter’s Cologne Cathedral. 3. The Paperboy. I think about it regularly.

Lavallee: Was wondering if you could detail the visual ideas you had for the look of the film…what were you aiming for? Was it important to detail/distinguish the eccentricities or differences found in Japanese society?

Zellner: While particular with our focus and tone, the two places, Tokyo and Minnesota, were so inherently different we let the distinguishing details unfold naturally rather than force anything. This is why it was crucial that we shot on location.

Lavallee: We’re guessing that there isn’t much written dialogue…. ­how was sound and score written into the film and I’m curious if you work with storyboards or is there a more organic approach during filming?

Zellner:
See full article at ioncinema »

Arts preview 2014: daredevils

  • The Guardian - TV News
Theatrical hell-raisers and the art world's enfants terribles take centre stage in our roundup of the biggest risk-takers of 2014

Theatre

Oh! What a Lovely War

Theatre-maker Joan Littlewood was a visionary, an iconoclast and a subversive. Her 1963 "documentary collage" about the bitter ironies of the first world war was way ahead of its time, using popular period song and hard-hitting testimony. Lyn Gardner Theatre Royal Stratford East, London E15 (020-8534 0310), 1 February to 15 May.

Macbeth

Shakespeare's dark tale as you've never seen it before, taking place in a secret location from dawn to dusk. Party with Duncan, bed down in Macbeth's castle on the 27th floor of a tower block, glimpse the witches in an underground car park, and join the feast at which Banquo will be an uninvited guest. The spectres will be bloody – but the food will be vegetarian. LG Secret location, London, 4 April to 31 May.

Grit

This
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Arts preview 2014: daredevils

  • The Guardian - Film News
Theatrical hell-raisers and the art world's enfants terribles take centre stage in our roundup of the biggest risk-takers of 2014

Theatre

Oh! What a Lovely War

Theatre-maker Joan Littlewood was a visionary, an iconoclast and a subversive. Her 1963 "documentary collage" about the bitter ironies of the first world war was way ahead of its time, using popular period song and hard-hitting testimony. Lyn Gardner Theatre Royal Stratford East, London E15 (020-8534 0310), 1 February to 15 May.

Macbeth

Shakespeare's dark tale as you've never seen it before, taking place in a secret location from dawn to dusk. Party with Duncan, bed down in Macbeth's castle on the 27th floor of a tower block, glimpse the witches in an underground car park, and join the feast at which Banquo will be an uninvited guest. The spectres will be bloody – but the food will be vegetarian. LG Secret location, London, 4 April to 31 May.

Grit

This
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jeff Koons' Balloon Dog Sculpture Sells for Record-Breaking $58.4 Million

Jeff Koons' Balloon Dog Sculpture Sells for Record-Breaking $58.4 Million
The sum is the highest ever paid for a work by a living artist.

Pop-art provocateur Jeff Koons has broken a world record for a price paid for a single artwork by a living artist. His sculpture "Balloon Dog (Orange)" fetched $58,405,000 at a Christie's New York auction on Tuesday night. High-end estimates suggested it might sell for as much as $55 million. (The previous record-holder was a painting by Gerhard Richter depicting an Italian city square, which sold for $37.1 million in May.) Christie's has released no information as to the identity of the winning bidder.

Story: The Hollywood Reporter Reveals the Industry's Top 25 Art Collectors

The sculpture, standing 12 feet high and crafted out of stainless steel to resemble the kind of novelty a clown might twist into existence at a children's birthday party, was sold on behalf of the Brant Foundation Art Study Center in Greenwich, Connecticut. It is one in a series of five,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Film critic Stanley Kauffman dead at 97

Film critic Stanley Kauffman dead at 97
Stanley Kauffmann, the erudite critic, author and editor who reviewed movies for The New Republic for more than 50 years, wrote his own plays and fiction, and helped discover the classic novels Fahrenheit 451 and The Moviegoer, died Wednesday. He was 97.

Kauffmann died of pneumonia at St. Luke’s Hospital in Manhattan, said Adam Plunkett, assistant literary editor at The New Republic.

Kauffmann started at The New Republic in 1958 and remained there – except for a brief interlude – for the rest of his life, becoming one of the oldest working critics in history. He wrote during a dynamic era that featured the
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Film Critic Stanley Kauffmann Dies at 97

Film Critic Stanley Kauffmann Dies at 97
New York (AP) — Stanley Kauffmann, the erudite critic, author and editor who reviewed movies for The New Republic for more than 50 years, wrote his own plays and fiction, and helped discover the classic novels “Fahrenheit 451″ and “The Moviegoer,” died Wednesday. He was 97.

Kauffmann died of pneumonia at St. Luke’s Hospital in Manhattan, said Adam Plunkett, assistant literary editor at The New Republic.

Kauffmann started at The New Republic in 1958 and remained there — except for a brief interlude — for the rest of his life, becoming one of the oldest working critics in history. He wrote during a dynamic era that featured the rise of the French New Wave and the emergence of such American directors as Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg. He was among the last survivors of a generation of reviewers that included The New Yorker’s Pauline Kael and the Village Voice’s Andrew Sarris, idols of the “Film Generation,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tony Scott: A Moving Target—Movement B

  • MUBI
Part of the Tony Scott: A Moving Target critical project. Go here for the project's description, index and links to project's other movement.

To the overabundance of text, sounds, images—and moving images—in Tony Scott, we reply with something like our own. So let me (try to) keep this (almost as) short as a Tony Scott shot. Scott’s death this past summer would elicit film critics’ own counterpart to American politics: opinions and generalizations bandied between two camps who were, as always, preaching to their respective choirs. And needless to say, such discourses would be about as useful, informative, and interesting as American politics. For Scott’s work was hardly encamped: the outward liberalism of Enemy of the State, perhaps Hollywood’s most overt attack on our surveillance nation and the Nsa, possible only before 9/11, concludes that only Nsa aspirants can take down the Nsa, just as Man on Fire,
See full article at MUBI »

TonyScottDeathSong

  • MUBI
This article is part of the critical project Tony Scott: A Moving Target in which an analysis of a scene from a Tony Scott film is passed anonymously to the next participant in the project to respond to with an analysis of his or her own.

<- the previous analysis | movement index   | the next analysis ->

“They say this place here is haunted.

Yeah, but only by a ghost...”

It’s a good way to burrow in, those Superimpositions. Those defiant anti-subtitles. “I’m having Font issues...” Walken whines somewhere. Me too. My favorite is in Domino: the fabulously absurd and banal, the “with Dad” that over-clarifies that the guy who looks nothing like Lawrence Harvey (who ever did?), that guy we’ve just seen in The Manchurian Candidate in 1962 is, in the diegetic account, still alive, and still her father in 1993. Markerian is supposedly the word for this.

Superimposition of text—against and over the weak image.
See full article at MUBI »

Saltz Challenges: Produce a Perfect Faux Gerhard Richter Painting, and I’ll Buy It

  • Vulture
I love art, but I hate the astronomical prices it sells for. My skin crawls when I read about auctions, and every year they get grosser. Last month, a living-artist record was set when a 1994 abstract Gerhard Richter painting was sold for $34.2 million. Like a lot of these purchases, the sale was about a collector trying to make art history by spending money. Or big-dick-waving. Ugh.I want to own art like this, but I’m not rich, and I also think it’s a conflict of interest for a critic to own work that he or she may write about. (Reviews can affect market value.) So, last winter, I put out a call on Facebook. I’d pay anyone $155 plus the cost of materials to make me a perfect fake by Richter, Ryman, Flavin, Fontana, Du­champ, Hirst, Guyton, or Agnes Martin. (Why $155? It’s enough money to me
See full article at Vulture »

James Franco to work in Christmas shop – but is it art?

The actor's latest role is as a shop assistant but art's tacit link to commerce is centuries old. Every gallery is a shop

Actor and artist James Franco is to man a pop-up store in Mayfair as the Christmas shopping season gets going to raise funds for a south London art gallery. He's played a hiker trapped under a rock in Danny Boyle's film 127 Hours, so standing behind a counter should be a doddle.

The shop is called House of Voltaire, and it will occupy a space in Adam's Row, Mayfair, in aid of the art gallery Studio Voltaire. Other celebrities are also working in it, and artists including Mark Titchner and Pablo Bronstein have designed goods for this upmarket art boutique.

What is it about art and shopping? They have a long history together. House of Voltaire claims inspiration from the Omega Workshops, which opened in 1913 (hey, that's
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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