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What To Buy This Week: DVD and Blu-ray releases for October 3rd

It’s the start of another week, so you know what that means – more DVD and Blu-ray releases to swallow up all your hard-earned cash! So here’s the rundown of what’s available to buy from today, October 3rd 2011.

Pick Of The Week

Chuck: Season 4 Box Set (DVD/Blu-ray)

When Chuck Bartowski opens an e-mail subliminally encoded with government secrets, he unwittingly downloads an entire server of sensitive data into his brain. Now, the fate of the world lies in the unlikely hands of a guy who works at a Buy More Electronics store. Instead of fighting computer viruses, he must now confront assassins and international terrorists. With the government’s most precious secrets in Chuck’s head, Major John Casey of the National Security Agency assumes the responsibility of protecting him. His partner is the CIA’s top agent -and Chuck’s first date in years – Sarah Walker.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

DVD Review: Monster Mutt

Monster Mutt

Stars: Rhiannon Leigh Wryn, Billy Unger, Zack Ward, Brian Stepanek, Juliet Landau | Written by Timothy Dolan | Directed by Todd Tucker

I’ll admit it, ever since I heard that Monster Mutt was being released I’ve been chomping at the bit (pardon the pun) to watch it. Why? Well the film was described to me as a family-friendly 80s throwback featuring a giant dog that was all puppet and no CGI. 80s? No CGI? Sounds like a dream combo to me… And thankfully I wasn’t disappointed.

Monster Mutt tells the story of the Taylor family, more pointedly the two Taylor children Ashley (Wryn) and Zach (Unger) and their beloved, and clever, family pet Max who is kidnapped by the evil Sirus Caldwell (Ward) and subjected to a bizarre experimental injection that sees Max transformed into the eponymous monster mutt. With a little help from scientist Dr. Victor
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Visionary Cinema Presents "Monster Mutt" on DVD

  • FilmArcade.net
Appealing both to grade school children and 40-somethings who grew up with films including Steven Spielberg’s E.T. and Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Monster Mutt concerns Max, the Taylor family mutt, leading idyllic the dog’s life at home. He has a doting master named Ashley (Rhiannon Leigh Wryn), a comfortable doghouse in the back yard, and a satisfying routine. Not far away, in a
See full article at FilmArcade.net »

the oh-no! DVD of the week: ‘Monster Mutt’

For monster mutts lasting longer than four hours, consult a physician immediately: The Taylor's family dog, Max, is kidnapped by the evil Sirus Caldwell, (Zack Ward) CEO of mega corporation Envigormax, to be used as a test subject for a new super energy drink. When trials go terribly wrong, Max escapes only to be transformed from his lovable self into... ''Monster Mutt''! The Taylor kids, Ashley (Rhiannon Leigh Wryn) & Zach (Billy Unger) try to save their loyal friend with the help of the scientist, Dr. Victor Lloyd (Brian Stepanek), who regretfully helped transform Max. The children must elude the evil Sirus and his henchwoman Natalya (Juliet Landau), who are determined to capture Monster Mutt to complete their experiment! Monster Mutt, is an adventure in both comedy & chaos as the Taylor kids race to find a cure for their furry loved one before it's too late! “Envigormax”? Really? *shudder* No,
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

DVD and Blu-Ray Releases: January 4th - Exorcise Your Machete With A Case

Whoa, what a way to start the new year! After several weeks of desolate conditions in terms of horror title releases, the floodgate just burst open.

This is the week you may want to think about using up those giftcards and cash you got from returning your holiday presents. Major releases are vying for your greenbacks alongside re-releases in Blu-ray and Blu-ray 3D (in case Santa brought you a 3D TV recently), and other more independent titles. In addition to movies, there's also a Buffy motion comic and the next volume of a vampire's diary in paperback.

The Last Exorcism (Review)

Directed by Daniel Stamm

Starring Patrick Fabian (Interview), Ashley Bell, Louis Herthum, Tony Bentley

When he arrives on the rural Louisiana farm of Louis Sweetzer, the Reverend Cotton Marcus expects to perform just another routine “exorcism” on a disturbed religious fanatic. An earnest fundamentalist, Sweetzer has contacted the charismatic preacher as a last resort,
See full article at Dread Central »

‘Monster Mutt’ – Trailer

Monster Mutt is a family-friendly, 80s retro-looking monster dog movie (which Doesn’T feature CGI – yay!) that follows:

…a pair of kids trying to save their beloved pooch from a mad scientist working for a sinister villain whose experiment has transformed their dog into a crazy-eyed muppet monstrosity.

The film, which is going straight to DVD in the Us, is directed by Todd Tucker and stars Rhiannon Leigh Wryn (The Last Mimzy), Bart Johnson (High School Musical), Brian Stepanek (The Suite Life of Zach and Cody), Juliet Landau (Buffy the Vampire Slayer) and Zack Ward (Postal).

According to Dread Central, Monster Mutt is released in the Us on January 4th 2011.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Monster Mutt Trailer and DVD Date

It was a little over a year ago when I first brought news of Monster Mutt, a monstrous new family film billing itself as "Beethoven meets Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" about a lovable dog transformed by a mad scientist into an adorably silly looking furry fiend. I predicted then it would be on DVD shelves sometime in 2010. My prediction proved off by four days.

Monster Mutt will arriving on DVD shelves at Wal-Mart and other DVD retailers/renters on January 4, 2011. Todd Tucker (a co-producer of the Night of the Demons remake) directs Rhiannon Leigh Wryn (The Last Mimzy), Bart Johnson (High School Musical), Brian Stepanek ("The Suite Life of Zach and Cody"), Juliet Landau ("Buffy the Vampire Slayer") and Zack Ward (Postal) in this frightfully funny family flick about a pair of kids trying to save their beloved pooch from a mad scientist working for a sinister villain whose
See full article at Dread Central »

The Last Mimzy

The Last Mimzy
This review was written for the festival screening of "The Last Mimzy". PARK CITY -- New Line Cinema honcho Robert Shaye makes a rare appearance in the director's chair (his first since 1990's "Book of Love") bringing the well-regarded short story "Mimsy Were the Borogoves" to the big screen as the family-friendly fantasy "The Last Mimzy".

In the process the Lewis Padgett piece, first published in a 1943 science-fiction collection, has been turned into a reasonably engaging movie filled with fun visual effects and an appealing tone reminiscent of a certain Spielberg movie about an out-of-his-element extraterrestrial.

While the Shaye picture, which was given an advance preview in conjunction with a New Line 40-year retrospective conversation hosted by Sundance director Geoffrey Gilmore, won't be phoning home those "E.T". figures, "Mimzy" packs sufficient whimsy to make it a solid performer when it lands in theaters on March 23.

Despite the spelling change, screenwriters Bruce Joel Rubin ("Ghost") and Toby Emmerich ("Frequency") are unlikely to offend many purists in their update of the original work, about a box of educational toys that have been sent back from the future to the present. The original title took its cue from a line in Lewis Carroll's poem "Jabberwocky".

Here, the Mimzy in question is an innocuous-looking, well-traveled toy bunny found among mysterious items in a box that turns up floating behind the Wilder family waterfront vacation home in Seattle.

Opting not to share their discovery with their workaholic dad (Timothy Hutton) and overly cautious mom (Joely Richardson), siblings Noah (Chris O'Neil) and Emma Rhiannon Leigh Wryn) soon discover that playing with the newfound objects has a profound effect on their intelligence levels.

It's a development that doesn't go unnoticed by Noah's teacher, Mr. White ("The Office's" Rainn Wilson), who detects a higher purpose in the boy's complex geometric doodles that bear an eerie resemblance to the ancient configurations that keep popping up in his dreams.

Emma, meanwhile, has been picking up telepathically on Mimzy's warnings regarding the survival of the inhabitants of the future and has to act fast before special government agent Nathaniel Boardman Michael Clarke Duncan), who's investigating the source of a citywide blackout, gets to her.

Viewers willing to go along for the ride should be agreeably charmed by the yarn. And whenever developments threaten to push the boundaries of credibility a little too far, Wilson's character reins in the excess with his sardonic line delivery.

But even he can't salvage a jarringly clunky bit of product placement concerning Mimzy's internal make-up that yanks older viewers out of the mythology with little time left to bring them back into the fold.

Fortunately, Shaye ultimately manages to win enough of them over with the help of his inventive visual effects team, his energetic cast and a gently expansive Howard Shore score, assuring "Mimzy" a promising future.

THE LAST MIMZY

New Line Cinema

New Line Cinema, Michael Phillips Prods.

Credits:

Director: Robert Shaye

Screenwriters: Bruce Joel Rubin, Toby Emmerich

Based on the short story "Mimsy Were the Borogoves" by Lewis Padgett

Producer: Michael Phillips

Executive producers: Robert Shaye, Justis Greene, Sara Risher

Director of photography: J. Michael Muro

Production designer: Barry Chusid

Editor: Alan Heim

Costume designer: Karen Matthews

Music: Howard Shore

Visual effects supervisor: Eric Durst

Cast:

Jo Wilder: Joely Richardson

David Wilder: Timothy Hutton

Nathaniel Boardman: Michael Clarke Duncan

Larry White: Rainn Wilson

Naomi: Kathryn Hahn

Noah Wilder: Chris O'Neil

Emma Wilder: Rhiannon Leigh Wryn

Running time -- 90 minutes

MPAA rating: PG

The Last Mimzy

The Last Mimzy
PARK CITY -- New Line Cinema honcho Robert Shaye makes a rare appearance in the director's chair (his first since 1990's "Book of Love") bringing the well-regarded short story "Mimsy Were the Borogoves" to the big screen as the family-friendly fantasy "The Last Mimzy".

In the process the Lewis Padgett piece, first published in a 1943 science-fiction collection, has been turned into a reasonably engaging movie filled with fun visual effects and an appealing tone reminiscent of a certain Spielberg movie about an out-of-his-element extraterrestrial.

While the Shaye picture, which was given an advance preview in conjunction with a New Line 40-year retrospective conversation hosted by Sundance director Geoffrey Gilmore, won't be phoning home those "E.T". figures, "Mimzy" packs sufficient whimsy to make it a solid performer when it lands in theaters on March 23.

Despite the spelling change, screenwriters Bruce Joel Rubin ("Ghost") and Toby Emmerich ("Frequency") are unlikely to offend many purists in their update of the original work, about a box of educational toys that have been sent back from the future to the present. The original title took its cue from a line in Lewis Carroll's poem "Jabberwocky".

Here, the Mimzy in question is an innocuous-looking, well-traveled toy bunny found among mysterious items in a box that turns up floating behind the Wilder family waterfront vacation home in Seattle.

Opting not to share their discovery with their workaholic dad (Timothy Hutton) and overly cautious mom (Joely Richardson), siblings Noah (Chris O'Neil) and Emma Rhiannon Leigh Wryn) soon discover that playing with the newfound objects has a profound effect on their intelligence levels.

It's a development that doesn't go unnoticed by Noah's teacher, Mr. White ("The Office's" Rainn Wilson), who detects a higher purpose in the boy's complex geometric doodles that bear an eerie resemblance to the ancient configurations that keep popping up in his dreams.

Emma, meanwhile, has been picking up telepathically on Mimzy's warnings regarding the survival of the inhabitants of the future and has to act fast before special government agent Nathaniel Boardman Michael Clarke Duncan), who's investigating the source of a citywide blackout, gets to her.

Viewers willing to go along for the ride should be agreeably charmed by the yarn. And whenever developments threaten to push the boundaries of credibility a little too far, Wilson's character reins in the excess with his sardonic line delivery.

But even he can't salvage a jarringly clunky bit of product placement concerning Mimzy's internal make-up that yanks older viewers out of the mythology with little time left to bring them back into the fold.

Fortunately, Shaye ultimately manages to win enough of them over with the help of his inventive visual effects team, his energetic cast and a gently expansive Howard Shore score, assuring "Mimzy" a promising future.

THE LAST MIMZY

New Line Cinema

New Line Cinema, Michael Phillips Prods.

Credits:

Director: Robert Shaye

Screenwriters: Bruce Joel Rubin, Toby Emmerich

Based on the short story "Mimsy Were the Borogoves" by Lewis Padgett

Producer: Michael Phillips

Executive producers: Robert Shaye, Justis Greene, Sara Risher

Director of photography: J. Michael Muro

Production designer: Barry Chusid

Editor: Alan Heim

Costume designer: Karen Matthews

Music: Howard Shore

Visual effects supervisor: Eric Durst

Cast:

Jo Wilder: Joely Richardson

David Wilder: Timothy Hutton

Nathaniel Boardman: Michael Clarke Duncan

Larry White: Rainn Wilson

Naomi: Kathryn Hahn

Noah Wilder: Chris O'Neil

Emma Wilder: Rhiannon Leigh Wryn

Running time -- 90 minutes

MPAA rating: PG

See also

Credited With | External Sites