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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 92 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Bypassed Palme d'Or Contenders Academy Award Chances? From Haneke's Latest to Pattinson Thriller

20 June 2017 8:14 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Good Time' with Robert Pattinson: All but completely bypassed at the Cannes Film Festival, Ben and Joshua Safdie's crime thriller – co-written by Joshua Safdie and Ronald Bronstein – may turn out to be a key contender in various categories next awards season. Bypassed Palme d'Or contenders (See previous post re: Cannes winners Diane Kruger & Sofia Coppola's Oscar chances.) The Cannes Film Festival has historically been both U.S.- and eurocentric. In other words, filmmaking from other countries in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific tend to be ignored either at the awards ceremony or at the very outset – in other words, they don't even get the chance to compete for the Palme d'Or. This year was no different, with a mere two non-u.S., non-European productions (or co-productions) among the 19 films in the Official Competition: Naomi Kawase's Japanese romantic drama Radiance and Hong Sang-soo's South Korean romantic drama The Day After. Both came out empty-handed. Among the other movies that failed to win any of the Official Competition awards, several may have a shot in some category or other come Oscar time. Notably: The socially conscious family drama Happy End, produced by veteran Margaret Ménégoz (Pauline at the Beach, Europa Europa) and a Sony Pictures Classics release in North America. Dir.: Michael Haneke. Cast: Isabelle Huppert. Jean-Louis Trintignant. Mathieu Kassovitz. The mix of time-bending mystery and family drama Wonderstruck, a Roadside Attractions / Amazon Studios release (on Oct. 20) in the U.S. Dir.: Todd Haynes. Cast: Julianne Moore. Millicent Simmonds. Cory Michael Smith. The crime drama Good Time, an A24 release (on Aug. 11) in the U.S. Dir.: Ben and Joshua Safdie. Cast: Robert Pattinson. Jennifer Jason Leigh. Barkhad Abdi. Cannes non-win doesn't mean weaker Oscar chances It's good to remember that the lack of a Cannes Film Festival win doesn't necessarily reduce a film's, a director's, a screenwriter's, or a performer's Oscar chances. Case in point: last year's Cannes Best Actress “loser” Isabelle Huppert for Elle. Here are a few other recent examples of Cannes non-winners in specific categories that went on to receive Oscar nods: Carol (2015), Best Actress (Cate Blanchett) nominee. Two Days, One Night / Deux jours, une nuit (2014), Best Actress (Marion Cotillard) nominee. The Great Beauty / La grande bellezza (2013), Best Foreign Language Film winner. The Hunt / Jagten (2012), Best Foreign Language Film nominee (at the 2013 Academy Awards). The Artist (2011), Best Picture and Best Director (Michel Hazanavicius) Oscar winner. And here's a special case: Amour leading lady and 2012 Best Actress Oscar nominee Emmanuelle Riva could not have won the Best Actress Award at Cannes, as current festival rules prevent Palme d'Or winners from taking home any other Official Competition awards. In other words, Isabelle Huppert (again), Julianne Moore, and Robert Pattinson – and their respective films – could theoretically remain strong Oscar contenders despite the absence of Cannes Film Festival Official Competition victories. Mohammad Rasoulof and Leslie Caron among other notable Cannes winners Besides those already mentioned in this article, notable winners at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival include: Mohammad Rasoulof's A Man of Integrity. Having infuriated Iran's theocracy, in 2010 Rasoulof was sentenced to a year in prison following accusations of “filming without a permit.” He has been out on bail. In 2011, Rasoulof won the Un Certain Regard sidebar's Best Director Award for Goodbye. Two years later, his Un Certain Regard entry Manuscripts Don't Burn won the International Film Critics' Fipresci Prize. Veteran Leslie Caron and her 17-year-old pet rescue dog Tchi Tchi shared the Palm DogManitarian Award for their work in the British television series The Durrells in Corfu / The Durrells. Caron, who will be turning 86 on July 1, made her film debut in Vincente Minnelli's 1951 musical An American in Paris – that year's Best Picture Academy Award winner. She would be shortlisted twice for the Best Actress Oscar: Lili (1953) and The L-Shaped Room (1963). Last year, she was the subject of Larry Weinstein's documentary Leslie Caron: The Reluctant Star and will next be seen in Thomas Brunot's short The Perfect Age. Faces Places / Visages, villages, which offers a tour of the French countryside, won Cannes' Golden Eye Award for Best Documentary. The directors are veteran Agnès Varda (Cléo from 5 to 7, Vagabond), who turned 89 on May 30, and photographer/muralist Jr. Faces Places is supposed to be Varda's swan song, following a career spanning more than six decades. Her 2008 César-winning documentary The Beaches of Agnès was one of the 15 semi-finalists for the Best Documentary Feature Oscar. See below a comprehensive list of the 2017 Cannes Film Festival winners. Leslie Caron in 'The Durrells in Corfu.' TV series a.k.a. 'The Durrells' earned the veteran two-time Best Actress Oscar nominee ('Lili,' 1953; 'The L-Shaped Room,' 1963) and her dog companion Tchi Tchi this year's Palm DogManitarian Award at the Cannes Film Festival. 2017 Cannes Film Festival winners Official Competition Palme d'Or: The Square (dir.: Ruben Östlund). Grand Prix: 120 Beats per Minute (dir.: Robin Campillo). Jury Prize: Loveless (dir.: Andrey Zvyagintsev). Best Screenplay (tie): The Killing of a Sacred Deer, Yorgos Lanthimos & Efthymis Filippou. You Were Never Really Here, Lynne Ramsay. Best Actress: Diane Kruger, In the Fade. Best Actor: Joaquin Phoenix, You Were Never Really Here. Best Director: Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled. Best Short Film: A Gentle Night (dir.: Qiu Yang). Short Film Special Mention: Katto (dir.: Teppo Airaksinen).   Un Certain Regard Un Certain Regard Award: A Man of Integrity (dir.: Mohammad Rasoulof). Jury Prize: April's Daughter / Las hijas de abril (dir.: Michel Franco). Best Director: Taylor Sheridan, Wind River. Best Actress / Best Performance: Jasmine Trinca, Fortunata. Prize for Best Poetic Narrative: Barbara (dir.: Mathieu Amalric).   International Film Critics' Fipresci Prize Official Competition:  120 Beats per Minute. Un Certain Regard: Closeness (dir.: Kantemir Balagov). Directors' Fortnight: The Nothing Factory / A Fábrica de Nada (dir.: Pedro Pinho).   Directors' Fortnight / Quinzaine des Réalisateurs Prix Sacd (Société des Auteurs Compositeurs Dramatiques) (tie): Lover for a Day / L'amant d'un jour (dir.: Philippe Garrel). Let the Sunshine In / Un beau soleil intérieur (dir.: Claire Denis). C.I.C.A.E. Art Cinema Award: The Rider (dir.: Chloe Zhao). Europa Cinemas Label: A Ciambra (dir.: Jonas Carpignano). Prix Illy for Best Short Film: Back to Genoa City / Retour à Genoa City (dir.: Benoît Grimalt).   Critics' Week Grand Prize: Makala (dir.: Emmanuel Gras). Visionary Award: Gabriel and the Mountain / Gabriel e a Montanha (dir.: Fellipe Barbosa). Gan Foundation Award for Distribution: Version Originale Condor, French distributor of Gabriel and the Mountain. Sacd Award: Léa Mysius, Ava. Discovery Award for Best Short Film: Los desheredados (dir.: Laura Ferrés). Canal+ Award for Best Short Film: The Best Fireworks Ever / Najpienkniejsze Fajerwerki Ever (dir.: Aleksandra Terpinska).   Other Cannes Film Festival 2017 Awards 70th Anniversary prize: Nicole Kidman. Caméra d'Or for Best First Film: Montparnasse Bienvenue / Jeune femme (dir.: Léonor Serraille). Golden Eye Award for Best Documentary: Faces Places / Visages, Villages (dir.: Agnès Varda, Jr). Prize of the Ecumenical Jury: Radiance (dir.: Naomi Kawase). Queer Palm: 120 Beats per Minute. Queer Palm for Best Short Film: Islands / Les îles (dir.: Yann Gonzalez). Cannes Soundtrack Award for Best Composer: Daniel Lopatin, Good Time. Vulcan Prize for Artist Technicians: Josefin Åsberg, The Square. Kering Women in Motion Award: Isabelle Huppert. Palm Dog: Einstein the Dog for The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected). Palm DogManitarian Award: Leslie Caron and the dog Tchi Tchi for The Durrells in Corfu. Chopard Trophy for Male/Female Revelation: George MacKay and Anya Taylor-Joy.   This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/). »

- Steph Mont.

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Cannes Winning Best Actor and Lanthimos' Quirky 'Family' Thriller Academy Award Chances?

20 June 2017 7:38 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'120 Beats per Minute' trailer: Robin Campillo's AIDS movie features plenty of drama and a clear sociopolitical message. AIDS drama makes Pedro Almodóvar cry – but will Academy members tear up? (See previous post re: Cannes-Oscar connection.) In case France submits it to the 2018 Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, screenwriter-director Robin Campillo's AIDS drama 120 Beats per Minute / 120 battements par minute, about the Paris Act Up chapter in the early 1990s, could quite possibly land a nomination. The Grand Prix (Cannes' second prize), international film critics' Fipresci prize, and Queer Palm winner offers a couple of key ingredients that, despite its gay sex scenes, should please a not insignificant segment of the Academy membership: emotionalism and a clear sociopolitical message. When discussing the film after the presentation of the Palme d'Or, Pedro Almodóvar (and, reportedly, jury member Jessica Chastain) broke into tears. Some believed, in fact, that 120 Beats per Minute »

- Steph Mont.

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Film Review: ‘Mobile Homes’

11 June 2017 11:49 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

French-born, Nyu Tisch-educated director Vladimir de Fontenay’s “Mobile Homes” is born out of a paradox: Inspired by the uniquely American sight of a prefab home rolling down the highway, its very existence owes to the foreign helmer’s naïveté. Whereas locals might take such an image for granted, de Fontenay was compelled to make a film about it (“Mobile Homes” is actually the second time he’s done so, following a 2013 short of the same name). Almost immediately, however, his ignorance becomes a liability, resulting in a squalid and deeply condescending portrait of what this outsider imagines lower-class Americana to be.

Although English actress Imogen Poots isn’t American either, she nearly saves the exercise by bringing a shred of human warmth to her portrayal of a flagrantly unfit mother who drags her 8-year-old son through a host of illegal schemes in a desperate effort to put a roof over their heads. »

- Peter Debruge

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Film Review: ‘Moscow Never Sleeps’

7 June 2017 5:49 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There may well be a whole section of the Muscovite elite that feels like punching the air, or perhaps clinking champagne glasses, in triumph at the end of Johnny O’Reilly’s “Moscow Never Sleeps,” a fleet-footed skitter of loosely interconnected storylines unfolding across the Russian capital over the course of one day. It’s not often, after all, that we get such a fresh-faced look at a city that foreign art house and festival devotees know better from the laceratingly critical work of brilliant doom-meister Andrey Zvyagintsev, among others. But with something of the zeal of the convert, Dubliner O’Reilly, who lived in Moscow for a decade, presents his low-cal-Altman stories of life, love, death and catharsis against a backdrop that gleams with modernity. Even when the location is a run-down, poky apartment full of old-lady tchotchkes and clashing-print furniture covers, Fëdor Lyass’ crisp, sleek photography confers »

- Jessica Kiang

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Cannes hit 'The Rider' gets UK deal

7 June 2017 4:41 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Protagonist inks sales on Chloé Zhao’s Directors’ Fortnight winner.

Altitude Film Distribution has taken UK and Ireland rights for Chloé Zhao’s The Rider, which won the top prize in this year’s Cannes Directors’ Fortnight sidebar.

The deal was struck between Altitude’s Will Clarke and Vanessa Saal from sales outfit Protagonist Pictures.

The Rider was previously picked up for by Sony Pictures Classics for North America, Latin America, Asia, Australia, New Zealand and Eastern Europe.

Protagonist has now also sold to film to: Les Films du Losange (France), Weltkino (Germany), Caramel Films (Spain), Cherry Pickers (Benelux), Cineworx (Switzerland), NonStop (Scandinavia and Iceland), Shani Films (Israel), Front Row Entertainment (Middle East), Fabula Films (Turkey) and Blue Lake (worldwide airlines).

Separately, Protagonist has also scored a series of further deals on fellow Directors’ Fortnight title The Florida Project, which Altitude took for the UK during Cannes.

Following its warmly-received Directors’ Fortnight berth, The Rider was presented »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

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Cannes 2017. Top Picks & Coverage Roundup

5 June 2017 7:59 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Let the Sunshine InBelow you will find our favorite films of Cannes 2017, as well as a complete index of our coverage. Awardstop Picksdaniel Kasman(1) Western (2) Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc (3) Closeness (4) The Day After (5) Lover for a Day (6) The Nothing Factory (7) Before We Vanish (8) The Florida Project (9) Claire's Camera (10) Blade of the Immortal (11) Good Time (12) Farpões, baldios (13) I Am Not a Witch (14) You Were Never Really Here (15) Napalm (?) Let the Sunshine InLAWRENCE Garcia(1) The Square (2) 120 Beats Per Minute (3) Closeness (4) Good Time (5) 24 Frames (6) You Were Never Really Here (7) Let the Sunshine In (8) The Summit (9)Western (10) I Am Not a WitchKURT Walker(1) Let the Sunshine In (2) Twin Peaks, S03E01 & S03E02 (3) Radiance (5) I Am Not a Witch (5) The Beguiled and Closeness***Coveragedaniel KASMANLoveless (Andrey Zvyagintsev)Wonderstruck (Todd Haynes)Western (Valeska Grisebach)Blade of the Immortal (Takashi Miike)Lover for a Day (Philippe Garrel)Claire's Camera (Hong Sang-soo)The Day »

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Two films tie on Screen's final Cannes jury grid

30 May 2017 8:55 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

With all the scores now collected, it’s a dead heat on this year’s grid.

The final results have now been counted for the 2017 edition of Screen’s Cannes jury grid, which aggregates ratings for all of the films in the festival’s competition…and there’s a tie for first place.

Early pace-setter Loveless was matched on the final day by Lynne Ramsay’s You Were Never Really Here, with both films scoring 3.2.

Ramsay’s latest had sat on 3.1 on the previously published edition of the grid, but a final four-star rating from France’s Michel Ciment bumped it up to match Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Loveless.

The films matched each other’s total of five maximum four-star scores, though they were both hampered by one-star ratings from Julien Gester and Didier Peron.

When compared with last year’s Cannes jury grid, the two films would have placed third, behind Paterson »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

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Cannes In Progress — 2nd of 3

29 May 2017 12:22 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

As we pass the halfway mark, several new developments of the Cannes International Film Festival seem to have more importance in some ways than the traditional Films in Competition which so far are “interesting” if lacking a bit in luster…

A jury of international critics gathered together by the top international trade paper, Screen International, keeps its own score of the 20 Competition Films as does Film Francais whose critics are all French. Thus far 13 have screened and on a scale of 4 (Excellent) to 0 (Bad), Screen’s highest scoring film so far is 3.2 for the French-Russian coproduction “Loveless” about a bitterly out-of-love couple going through a divorce who must team up to find their son who has disappeared during one of their brutal arguments. Directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev and funded independently because the Russian government so disliked his 2014 Competition Film, “Leviathan” ( for which it had put up 35% of the funding), that »

- Sydney Levine

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Cannes 2017. Awards

29 May 2017 7:44 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The SquareIN Competition

Palme d'Or: The Square directed by Ruben Östlund (read our review)Grand Prix: 120 Beats Per Minute directed by Robin Campillo (read our review)Jury Prize: Loveless by Andrey Zvyagintsev (read our review)Best Director: Sofia Coppola (read our review)Best Actor: Joaquin Phoenix for You Were Never Really HereBest Actress: Diane Kruger for In the FadeBest Scenario: Yorgos Lanthimos for The Killing of A Sacred Deer (read our review) and Lynne Ramsay for You Were Never Really Here70th Anniversary Prize: Nicole KidmanUN Certain REGARDLerd (A Man of Integrity) directed by Mohammad RassoulofPrix d'interpretation feminine: Jasmine Trinca for FortunataPrix de la Poésie du Cinéma: Barbara directed by Mathieu AmalricPrix de la mise en scène: Taylor Sheridan for Wind RiverJury Prize: April's Daughters directed by Michel FrancoCAMERA D'ORJeune Femme directed by Léonor SerrailleCRITICS' WEEKNespresso Grand Prize: Makala directed by Emmanuel GrasGan Foundation Prize and France 4 Visionary Award: Gabriel »

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Cannes 2017: Ruben Östlund’s The Square bags the Palme d’Or

29 May 2017 3:11 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Last night, the jury of the 70th Festival de Cannes awarded the prestigious Palme d’Or to Ruben Östlund’s comedy drama The Square. The film, which boasts the likes of Domic West and Elizabeth Moss amongst its cast, as well as a stunning lead performance by Claes Bang, beat off competition from the likes of Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled, Lynn Ramsay’s You Were Never Really Here and 120 Battements Par Minute (Bpm – Beats Per Minute), all of which were hotly tipped to take the top gong.

All of those movies did walk away with some kind of recognition, 120 Battements Par Minute (Bpm – Beats Per Minute) taking the Grand Prix, Sofia Coppola taking the Best Director prize for The Beguiled and You Were Never Really Here Best Performance By An Actor for Joaquin Phoenix and Best Screenplay, a prize shared with Yorgos Lanthimos’ superb The Killing Of A Sacred Deer. »

- Paul Heath

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Cannes 2017 Awards Analysis: ‘The Square’ Wins the Palme d’Or, But the Real Winners Are Hollywood Alternatives

28 May 2017 11:55 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After 10 days in which a jury watched 19 competition films, the 70th edition of the Cannes Film Festival came down to seven prizes for six of them. It didn’t take long for the jury to make it clear that they couldn’t settle on just one of many options. Announcing a tie for the screenplay award, jury president Pedro Almodovar said, “We have our first surprise.”

But the truth was that, in a wildly unpredictable year, everything felt like a surprise. Over the course of the 2017 festival, no single feature emerged as a definite frontrunner for the Palme d’Or, and the outcome of this year’s ceremony reflects the sheer range of options — all of which stand out as explicit challenges to safe commercial bets.

See More2017 Cannes Winners: ‘The Square’ Wins the Palme D’or, Sofia Coppola and Joaquin Phoenix Also Honored

It started with that screenplay award. »

- Eric Kohn

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Cannes 2017 Awards: Ruben Östlund’s ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or, Joaquin Phoenix Takes Best Actor

28 May 2017 10:58 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Ten days of cinephile heaven have wrapped for another year as the red carpet was rolled out for one last time at the Cannes Film Festival for the awards ceremony.

Read More: The 20 Most Anticipated Films Of The 2017 Cannes Film Festival

Ruben Östlund‘s “The Square” walked away the big winner, the unexpected recipient of the Palme d’Or. Continuing his tremendous run at Cannes, Andrey Zvyagintsev (who previously won Best Screenplay and a Special Jury Prize from Un Certain Regard) took home the Jury Prize for “Loveless.” The hotly buzzed “12o Beats Per Minute” landed the Grand Prix, though many expected it to take the Palme. 

Continue reading Cannes 2017 Awards: Ruben Östlund’s ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or, Joaquin Phoenix Takes Best Actor at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Cannes 2017: 'The Square' wins Palme d'Or; full list of winners

28 May 2017 10:47 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

There were also wins for Sofia Coppola, Joaquin Phoenix and Diane Kruger.

The Competition prizes for the 70th edition of the Cannes Film Festival have been handed out tonight (28 May) in the Lumiere Theatre, with Ruben Östlund’s The Square winning the coveted Palme d’Or.

Pedro Almodóvar presided over this year’s jury that also included Will Smith, Maren Ade, Park Chan-wook, Paolo Sorrentino, Jessica Chastain, Fan Bingbing, Agnès Jaoui and Gabriel Yared.

Full list of winners below:

Palme D’Or

The Square (Ruben Östlund)

Grand Prix

120 Beats Per Minute (Robin Campillo)

Best Director

Sofia Coppola (The Beguiled)

Best Actor

Joaquin Phoenix (You Were Never Really Here)

Best Actress

Diane Kruger (In the Fade)

Jury Prize

Loveless (Andrey Zvyagintsev)

Best Screenplay

The Killing Of A Sacred Deer and You Were Never Really Here

Camera D’Or

Jeune Femme (Léonor Sérraille)

Best Short Film

A Gentle Night (Qui Yang)

Short Film Special Mention

Katto (Teppo Airaksinen)

70th Anniversary »

- orlando.parfitt@screendaily.com (Orlando Parfitt)

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Cannes 2017: Competition - full list of winners as they happen

28 May 2017 10:47 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

19 films are competing for the Palme d’Or.

The Competition prizes for the 70th edition of the Cannes Film Festival will be handed out this evening (28 May) in the Lumiere Theatre, including the coveted Palme d’Or.

Pedro Almodóvar presided over this year’s jury that also included Will Smith, Maren Ade, Park Chan-wook, Paolo Sorrentino, Jessica Chastain, Fan Bingbing, Agnès Jaoui and Gabriel Yared.

The ceremony begins at around 6:15pm GMT. Watch the red carpet coverage below or Here on mobile.

Full list of winners, as they happen, below:

Best Actor

Joaquin Phoenix (You Were Never Really Here)

Best Actress

Diane Kruger (In the Fade)

Jury Prize

Loveless (Andrey Zvyagintsev)

Best Screenplay

The Killing Of Sacred Deer and You Were Never Really Here

Camera D’Or

Jeune Femme (Léonor Sérraille)

Best Short Film

A Gentle Night (Qui Yang)

Short Film Special Mention

Katto (Teppo Airaksinen)

Palme D’Orgrand Prixbest DIRECTORCannes 70 Competition filmsIn the Fade (Fatih Akin »

- orlando.parfitt@screendaily.com (Orlando Parfitt)

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At Cannes 2017, The Square Wins Palme d’Or; Coppola Best Director; and Lynne Ramsay’s Latest Wins Two

28 May 2017 10:28 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Here, as they are announced, are the winners of the 2017 Cannes Film Festival. Palme d’Or: The Square, Ruben Östlund. Special Prize for the 70th Anniversary: Nicole Kidman Grand Prix: 120 Beats Per Minute, directed by Robin Campillo Jury Prize: Loveless, Andrey Zvyagintsev Best Actress: Diane Kruger, In the Fade Best Actor: Joaquin Phoenix, You Were Never Really Here Best Director: Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled Best Screenplay: The Killing of a Sacred Deer (Yorgos Lathimos and Efthymis Filippou) and Lynne Ramsay (You Were Never Really Here) The Camera d’Or (given to best first film): Jeunne Femme/Montparnasse Bienvenue, directed by Leonor […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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Cannes Awards: Controversial Swedish Satire ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or

28 May 2017 10:25 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — The 70th anniversary Cannes Film Festival has wrapped, culminating with an unconventional awards ceremony in which Pedro Almodóvar and his jury bestowed a couple unexpected bonus prizes, including a tie for screenplay and a special award to Nicole Kidman, who appeared in four projects in this year’s official selection, including competition titles “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and “The Beguiled,” season two of “Top of the Lake” and special screening “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.”

Meanwhile, the fabled Palme d’Or went to Swedish director Ruben Östlund’s cutting art-world (and real-world) satire “The Square,” which dares to bring aspects of conceptual and performance art into the sphere of cinema. The choice came as something of a surprise, if only because the masterful, 142-minute film has divided audiences so far, and jury prizes rely on consensus.

Östlund’s follow-up to Un Certain Regard winner “Force Majeure, »

- Peter Debruge

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Cannes 2017: The 10 Best Movies of This Year’s Festival

28 May 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

You know you’re experiencing a strong year at the Cannes Film Festival when everyone has a different favorite movie. For some critics and journalists, the best was saved for the end, with Lynne Ramsay’s post-modern detective story “You Were Never Really Here” standing out in the competition; for others, the competition peaked early with Andrey Zyvagintsev’s kidnapping drama “Loveless.” And some people looked far beyond the competition for festival highlights, singling out selections from Un Certain Regard, Directors’ Fortnight and Critics Week, not to mention the out of competition screenings that were part of the Official Selection.

See MoreThe 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

In other words, Cannes is a lot of things to a lot of people, and each member of the IndieWire team attending the festival this year experienced the program in different ways. The following list »

- Eric Kohn, Anne Thompson and David Ehrlich

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Cannes 2017: The 10 Best Movies of This Year’s Festival

28 May 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

You know you’re experiencing a strong year at the Cannes Film Festival when everyone has a different favorite movie. For some critics and journalists, the best was saved for the end, with Lynne Ramsay’s post-modern detective story “You Were Never Really Here” standing out in the competition; for others, the competition peaked early with Andrey Zyvagintsev’s kidnapping drama “Loveless.” And some people looked far beyond the competition for festival highlights, singling out selections from Un Certain Regard, Directors’ Fortnight and Critics Week, not to mention the out of competition screenings that were part of the Official Selection.

See MoreThe 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

In other words, Cannes is a lot of things to a lot of people, and each member of the IndieWire team attending the festival this year experienced the program in different ways. The following list »

- Eric Kohn, Anne Thompson and David Ehrlich

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9 Thoughts on Cannes 2017

27 May 2017 11:31 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Cannes Film Festival played host to some good movies this year (there is never a year when it doesn’t), yet throughout the 12-day event, there has been a pervasive feeling, shared by critics and distributors and publicists and audiences alike, that the festival’s been having a soft year, that the magic was tamped down. It had something do with the lack of a universally agreed upon home run, like “Toni Erdmann” or “Amour” or “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days” or “Breaking the Waves.” (There were a handful of doubles and triples, but more disputes than not about all of them.) It had something to do with the new security system (long, slow lines to get through metal detectors), which freighted the simple act of walking into a movie with a touch of that airport depression. For all that, Cannes is still Cannes: the most momentous film festival in the world. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Cannes: Predicting This Year’s Palme d’Or Winner and Other Awards

27 May 2017 12:52 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s crunch time. All 19 competition films in this year’s Cannes Film Festival have been seen and scrutinized, and now jury president Pedro Almodovar — along with Jessica Chastain, Maren Ade, Will Smith, Agnes Jaoui, Park Chan-wook, Paolo Sorrentino, Fan Bingbing and Gabriel Yared — have the next day to argue amongst themselves over which title is most deserving of the Palme d’Or, among other prizes.

Every year, predicting the jury’s favorites is something of a fool’s errand, fraught with inconsistencies and unknowns: Who but the most gifted mind-reader, for example, can imagine how the Fresh Prince might groove to a Naomi Kawase film? Who foresaw last year’s jury shutting out critics’ darling “Toni Erdmann?” But it’s all in the game, so with a strict warning not to place any monetary bets on my say-so alone, here are my best guesses for tomorrow’s awards.

Palme D’Or: “A Gentle Creature, »

- Guy Lodge

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