Edit
Jose Canseco Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (2) | Trivia (36) | Personal Quotes (1)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 2 July 1964Havana, Cuba
Birth NameJose Canseco y Capas Jr.
Nickname The Chemist
Height 6' 3½" (1.92 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Jose Canseco was born on July 2, 1964 in Havana, Cuba as Jose Canseco y Capas Jr. He is an actor, known for Mail Order Wife (2004), The Apprentice (2004) and Celebrity Poker Live (2012). He was previously married to Jessica Canseco and Esther Haddad.

Spouse (2)

Jessica Canseco (27 August 1996 - 1999) (divorced) (1 child)
Esther Haddad (25 October 1988 - 25 November 1992) (divorced)

Trivia (36)

December 7, 2001: Arraigned before Miami-Dade County Circuit Judge Stanford Blake for two counts of aggravated battery in a 10/31/01 incident at a Miami Beach nightclub. Police said Canseco grabbed a club patron by the neck, punched him and broke his nose. Canseco claimed he was with his brother and three women when a man violently groped one of the women, so he pushed the man but never hit him.
1998: Pleaded no contest in 1998 to a domestic violence charge for hitting his wife, Jessica Canseco.
August 7, 2000: The New York Yankees obtain Canseco from the Devil Rays. The move, which mystifies even manager Joe Torre, is presumably designed to keep the high priced slugger away from AL East rivals.
December 9, 1998: The Tampa Bay Devil Rays sign Canseco.
February 4, 1998: Canseco signs a 1-year contract with the Toronto Blue Jays.
January 27, 1997: The Red Sox trade Canseco and cash to the Oakland Athletics for P John Wasdin.
December 9, 1994: The Boston Red Sox obtain Canseco from the Rangers in exchange for OF Otis Nixon and 3B Luis Ortiz.
May 29, 1993: Pitches the 8th inning of the Rangers 15-1 loss to the Red Sox in Boston. He allows three earned runs on three walks and two singles before retiring the side.
February 13th, 1992: Rams his now-ex wife Esther's car, causing $10,000 in damage, following an argument.
August 31, 1992: The A's trade Canseco to the Texas Rangers in exchange for OF Ruben Sierra, P Jeff Russell and Bobby Witt.
First player in MLB history to hit 40 home runs and steal 40 bases in the same season (1988).
November 25, 1986: Wins the AL Rookie of the Year Award, becoming the first A's player to do so since Harry Byrd in 1952.
November 16, 1988: Becomes the first unanimous AL MVP since Reggie Jackson in 1973.
Has identical twin brother, Osvaldo (Ozzie).
June 27, 1990: signed the most lucrative contract in baseball to that date, a five-year, $23.5 million deal.
Canseco's book "Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits, and How Baseball Got Big" prompted a Congressional hearing on the use of performance-enhancing substances in baseball. Canseco, Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa, Rafael Palmeiro, Curt Schilling, Frank Thomas, and commissioner Bud Selig testified on 17 March 2005. McGwire refused to answer questions while Sosa and Palmeiro denied using steroids. Palmeiro, Schilling and McGwire accused Canseco of lying. Palmeiro was suspended five months later violating baseball's steroids policy.
Canseco and Mark McGwire were known as the Bash Brothers. Their trademark was an elbow slap.
2002: Canseco had many firsts in 2002. He signed a minor league deal with the Montreal Expos. The Expos are the first team in the National League he had ever played for. He was going to be the OF/1B for the Frank Robinson managed team, but was released when he discovered he wouldn't be an every day player. He later signed a minor league contract with the White Sox and was sent to Triple-A Charlotte. The Charlotte Knights first game with Canseco was April 27th. Attendence at Charlotte increased over 50% once Canseco was with the Knights. He had five homers before retiring, May 13th.
First player in MLB history to hit 30 or more homers for four different teams.
Has claimed that 85% of current Major League Baseball players use steroids.
Photographed leaving Madonna's West Side apartment, then went 0-for-3 in Oakland's 5-3 loss to the Yankees. He claimed later in his book "Juiced" that she had tried to seduce him that night. (10 May 1991).
Sent to jail after violating probation for his part in a 31 October 2001 incident at a Miami Beach club. Judge Leonard E. Glick issued a warrant for Canseco's arrest after learning he had failed to begin anger control classes and community service, and leaving Florida for longer than 30 days, which were among the conditions of his three-year probation. Canseco's twin brother, Ozzie, who was also involved in the incident, has complied with the terms of his probation. (18 February 2003)
Attended Coral Park Senior High School in Miami, Florida.
Father of Josie Marie Canseco with ex-wife Jessica Canseco.
Finished 4th in voting for 1991 American League MVP.
Member of 1992 American League Western Division Champion Oakland Athletics Team. Member of 1994 American League Western Division Champion Texas Rangers Team. Member of 1995 American League Eastern Division Boston Red Sox Team. Member of 1988 and 1990 American League Champion Oakland Athletics Teams. Member of 1989 World Series Champion Oakland Athletics Team. Member of 2000 World Series Champion New York Yankees Team.
Had two singles in six at-bats with a walk and two strikeouts in an intrasquad game of an open tryout with the Los Angeles Dodgers at its Vero Beach, Florida training facility. Canseco, who is trying to get back into baseball, was told days earlier by the Dodgers there was a 99% chance the team wouldn't sign him. (1 March 2004)
Named to Baseball Digest magazine's 1986 Rookie All-Star Team.
Made major league debut on 2 September 1985.
Earned $45,080,000 in salary during his major league career.
Release of the book, "Juicy: Confessions of a Former Baseball Wife" by Jessica Canseco.
Hired by the Yuma (AZ) Scorpions of the independent North American League as manager. Canseco and his twin brother, Ozzie, will also play for the team. [April 2011]
Signed a contract with the Laredo Broncos of the United Baseball League. Canseco will serve as a bench coach, a DH, and a pitcher. [August 2010]
Release of his book, "Strength Training for Baseball".
Release of his book, "Vindicated: Big Names, Big Liars and the Battle to Save Baseball".
Release of his book, "Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'roids, Smash Hits and How Baseball Got Big".

Personal Quotes (1)

You'll be surprised at how steroid use has revolutionized the game of baseball. You'd be even more shocked if you found out which players have used them at one point or another in their career.

See also

Other Works | Publicity Listings | Official Sites | Contact Info

Contribute to This Page