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Louise Brealey Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Trivia (9) | Personal Quotes (4)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 27 March 1979Northampton, Northamptonshire, England, UK
Birth NameLouise Brealey
Height 5' 3" (1.6 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Louise Brealey, also credited as Loo Brealey, is an English actress, writer and journalist. Born in Bozeat, Northamptonshire, England. She attended Kimbolton School, proceeding to read History at Cambridge. She then trained at the Lee Strasberg Institute in New York City and with clown teacher Philippe Gaulier. She has written on cinema, art and music since her teens, contributing reviews and features for magazines including Premiere UK, Empire, Radio Times, SKY, The Face, Neon, AnOther and Total Film. In March 2012 Brealey produced, co-wrote and co-starred in The Charles Dickens Show, a children's comedy drama for BBC 2.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: wibblywobblytimeywimey

Trivia (9)

Auditioned for the role of Rose Tyler in Doctor Who (2005) but lost to Billie Piper.
Ex-partner of actor Bryan Dick.
Studied History at Cambridge University and also spent a year learning acting at the Lee Strasberg Institute in New York. She is an accomplished bell-ringer.
Made her stage debut in 2001 as 14-year-old Sophie in Max Stafford-Clark's production of Judy Upton's Sliding With Suzanne at London's Royal Court.
Her Sherlock character Molly Hooper was only originally meant to appear in the first episode of Sherlock.
She portrayed Charlotte Willis in the Big Finish Doctor Who audio story The Foe from the Future, as well as Millicent Belanger III in The Viyran Solution.
She wrote her first play "Pope Joan" in 2013 for the National Youth Theatre.
She read the part of Megan Hipwell in the audio-book edition of Girl on The Train by Paula Hawkins.
She has written about cinema, art and music since her teens, contributing reviews and features for magazines including Premiere UK, Empire, Radio Times, SKY, The Face, Neon, AnOther and Total Film.

Personal Quotes (4)

People are understanding that it's not about thinking men are pricks, it's about social justice. But it's no good feminism feeling like a white, middle-class women's club. We have to bring with us people of color, transgender people, disabled people and men and boys or we are pissing in the wind.
I'd like every man who doesn't call himself a feminist to explain to the women in his life why he doesn't believe in equality for women.
I think it is unforgivable when a sad play doesn't make you laugh at all. There is no excuse because as people we can laugh in all sorts of circumstances.
I am a very outspoken feminist and I enjoy having those sorts of conversations with young women who follow me because of Sherlock, There's a strange thing that happened - I became this sort of role model... to the great amusement of my friends and family!

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