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Cannes Film Festival Awards 2016

27 May 2016 3:42 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

As we mounted the stairs of the Red Carpet for the last time, the Closing Night Awards for the Cannes International Film Festival were announced by the Jury President, George Miller, Director of “Mad Max: Fury Road”.  The eight additional members, four women and four men -- Arnaud Desplechin, Kirsten Dunst, Valeria Golino, Mads Mikkelsen, László Nemes , Vanessa Paradis, Katayoon Shahabi and Donald Sutherland presented the awards. Surprise of the evening was that the German Competition film, Maren Ade’s “Toni Erdmann”, clearly an audience favorite and snatched up immediately for the U.S. by Sony Pictures Classics, received no award at all.  However, it was a great evening for IFC/ Sundance Selects who has the U.S. rights to three winners, "I, Daniel Blake", "Graduation" and "Personal Shopper". 

The Palme d’Or went to Ken Loach for “I, Daniel Blake”, the sad drama of a disabled worker and of a young single mother of two who hold each other up as they try to navigate the social service morass which denies them their rightful ability to pursue happiness.  The 79-year-old British director Ken Loach also won in 2006 for "The Wind that Shakes the Barley" and has had over 18 films selected for Cannes. This Sundance Selects acquisition brought audiences to wrenching tears.

“The festival is very important for the future of cinema,” said Loach. “When there is despair, the people from the far right take advantage. We must say that another world is possible and necessary.”

Best Director Award was split between Romanian Cristian Mungiu ("Graduation" or “Bacalaureat”) and Olivier Assayas (“Personal Shopper”).  Mungiu’s "4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days" won the Palme d'Or in 2007. His actresses had shared the Actress prize for "Beyond the Hills."  Like the Romanian 2013 Berlinale winner,  “Child’s Pose” and Iranian Asghar Farhadi’s 2012 Academy Award winner, “A Separation”, the film contains object lessons about the moral choices made by humans whose actions result in greater damage than originally foreseen, especially when taking place in an already corrupted society. In this story a father tries to protect his daughter and give her the greatest opportunities for making her life better than that of her parents.

Co-winner Olivier Assayas, received his first Cannes award for "Personal Shopper" (IFC Films).  This is his second English-language film starring Kristen Stewart (Cesar winner for "Clouds of Sils Maria").  As she buys fashionable attire for a rich client and tries to communicate with her twin brother, who has recently died. It was a great Cannes for Stewart, who was well-received in Woody Allen's "Cafe Society" (Amazon has U.S.) as well.

Best Screenplay went to “The Salesman” by Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi (Amazon and Cohen Media Group share U.S. rights).  His star, Shahab Hosseini won Best Actor his role as an actor in the midst of moving apartments and starring in Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman" when his wife (Taraneh Alidoosti) is assaulted in the shower of their new domicile by a man who assumes that she is the former tenant, a prostitute. Winning the Jury Prize for the third time (!) for coming of age road movie “American Honey” (A24 has U.S.) starring Shia Labeouf and unknown Sasha Lane. British director Andrea Arnold wanted to dance as she accepted the award.  Xavier Dolan, who won the 2014 Jury Prize of “Mommy” won the Grand Prix for his very theatrical "It's Only the End of the World". He cried to receive the award for his family drama starring some of the greatest French actors living today, Nathalie Baye, Vincent Cassel, Marion Cotillard, Léa Seydoux, Gaspard Ulliel.  The film has no U.S. distributor yet. To my mind, the acting far outstripped the story. I am just glad the other greatest French actor, Isabelle Huppert, was not in Dolan’s film.  She had her hands full in Paul Verhoeven’s “Elle” the Competition film about another woman attacked in her home by an unknown assailant. Best Actress went to Jaclyn Jose for “Ma' Rosa” by Philippine director Brillante Mendoza.

The Caméra d'Or ("Golden Camera") for the best first feature film presented in one of the Cannes' selections (Official Selection, Directors' Fortnight or International Critics' Week) went to “Divines” directed by Houda Benyamina.   Houda received her award with unconcealed joy and enthusiasm. The 35 year old Franco-Moroccan film director whose long and strong speech called on women to be more present in the world of cinema said, “I was always saying that I do not care about Cannes …but today, well I’m happy to be here. Cannes belongs to us too …For things to change, you have to put a lot more women in decision-making positions…I am a committed filmmaker, making films is a way to turn my [feminist] anger into perspective…Women! Women!” she added as she broke into the Arabic women’s Ululation. Houda’s film follows an impoverished young girl who drops out of school and escapes her family in search of her own emancipation and personal freedom.

Outside of the Official Awards the winner of the Queer Palm (Feature) was "Les Vies de Thérèse" by Sébastien Lifshitz and Queer Palm (Short): "Gabber Lover" Anna Cazenave-Cambet.  And finally, the Palme Dog went to Nellie for “Paterson”by Jim Jarmusch.

  »

- Sydney Levine

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The Best Films of the 2016 Cannes Film Festival

23 May 2016 10:29 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

After nearly two weeks of viewing some of the best that cinema will have to offer this year, the 69th Cannes Film Festival has concluded. With Ken Loach‘s I, Daniel Blake taking the top jury prize of Palme d’Or (full list of winners here), we’ve set out to wrap up our experience with our 10 favorite films from the festival, which extends to the Un Certain Regard and Directors’ Fortnight side bars.

It should be noted that The Nice Guys, which screened out of competition, was among our favorites of the festival (review here), but, considering it’s now in wide release, we’ve elected to give room to other titles. Check out our top 13 films below, followed by the rest of the reviews and all of our features. One can also return in the coming months as we learn of distribution news for all of the mentioned films. »

- The Film Stage

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Cannes 2016 Winners Include ‘I, Daniel Blake,’ ‘Personal Shopper,’ ‘The Salesman,’ and More

23 May 2016 4:51 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a jury headed up by George Miller, the 2016 Cannes Film Festival delivered their awards this weekend, giving Ken Loach his second Palme d’Or, this time for I, Daniel Blake. Meanwhile, Xavier Dolan get the runner-up for It’s Only the End of the World and Olivier Assayas tied with Cristian Mungiu for Best Director for Personal Shopper and Graduation, respectively. Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman picked up two awards, for Best Screenplay and Best Actor, while Jaclyn Jose rounded out the top winners for Best Actress in Ma’ Rosa and American Honey grabbed the Jury Prize.

Disappointingly, some of our favorites of the festival (including Toni Erdmann, Elle, Paterson, Staying Vertical, and Sieranevada) went home empty-handed. Ahead of our personal wrap-up arriving shortly, check out the full list of winners below, including reviews where available and a 30-minute talk with the jury regarding their decisions.

Competition

Palme d’or

I, »

- Jordan Raup

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Cannes Awards Wrap: How George Miller’s Jury Picked the Winners — And Losers

22 May 2016 2:16 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As juror László Nemes (“Son of Saul”) said at the start of the Cannes Film Festival, juries are by their nature random. One thing you can count on is that the actors on the jury will shift the conversation. From the start, this year’s actors said they were looking for emotion. And that’s what the two top winners boast in abundance. “It was a collective decision,” said Miller of his “nine-headed beast,” describing the awards process as like creating a painting. “We looked at every variable, it’s not like ticking off a vote for the Oscars…we were looking at the awards like a totality. It took so much time, so much rigor, it was exhausting, emotionally, as everyone was talking so passionately.”

Thanks to jury chief Miller, it was Mel Gibson (whose “Blood Father” played well as a Cannes midnight movie) who presented the Palme d’Or to 79-year-old British director Ken Loach, winning for the second time (2006’s “The Wind that Shakes the Barley”); he’s won many other prizes over 18 films selected for Cannes. By far the most emotional movie of the festival, “I, Daniel Blake” (Sundance Selects) brought audiences to wrenching tears, including this writer. Based on research into England’s public welfare crisis, the film is a fictionalized story set in Newcastle about a joiner (Dave Johns) who can’t seem to convince the state to give him the disability he needs after a heart condition makes it impossible for him to work.

“The festival is very important for the future of cinema,” said Loach. “When there is despair, the people from the far right take advantage. We must say that another world is possible and necessary.”

Read More: The 2016 Indiewire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

Many critics did not respond to Loach’s overtly political film because they didn’t think he was doing anything different from what he had done before. But they really didn’t like Xavier Dolan’s very theatrical “It’s Only the End of the World,” which won the consolation prize, the Grand Prix, which means that the jury responded very differently to this heartfelt adaptation of a play about a dysfunctional family, who scream in French in extreme closeup. (Dolan won the jury prize in 2014 for “Mommy.”)

“Thank you for feeling the emotions of the film,” said Dolan (who attacked the critical reaction to his film) in a speech during which he cried, lips trembling, and chewed on his hands. Maybe it will now be picked up for the U.S., although it won’t be a crowdpleaser.

Co-winner of the director prize, Romanian Cristian Mungiu (“Graduation”), had also won the Palme d’Or, for 2007’s “4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days,” and his actresses shared the Actress prize for “Beyond the Hills.” Mungiu’s “Graduation” (Sundance Selects) sends a controlling father (Adrian Titieni) into a tailspin when his long-held post-graduation plans for his daughter (Maria Dragus) go terribly awry. Mungiu points out each individual’s role in doing the right thing when corruption and compromise often rule the day.

Co-winner Olivier Assayas, on the other hand, accepted his first Cannes award for “Personal Shopper” (IFC Films), his second English-language film starring Kristen Stewart (Cesar winner for “Clouds of Sils Maria”), whose character acquires fashionable clothes for a rich client. She tries to use her skills as a medium to communicate with her twin brother, who has recently died, when mysterious texts suddenly appear on her iPhone. It was a great Cannes for Stewart, who was well-received in Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society” (Amazon) as well, and for IFC/Sundance Selects, which is releasing “I, Daniel Blake,” “Graduation” and “Personal Shopper.”

Those who thought that the women who dominated the Cannes would come home with multiple awards were sorely disappointed. British director Andrea Arnold took home the jury prize for the third time for her daring American road movie “American Honey” (A24), a coming of age story starring Shia Labeouf and unknown Sasha Lane, making Arnold three for three at the fest after 2006’s “Red Road” and 2009’s “Fish Tank.”

Critics adored the film, which was shaped by the American midwestern landscape as well as the editing room. The film was vastly different from its original script and unlike anything else at Cannes this year. “Five hours ago I was sitting in my neighbor’s garden drinking tea,” Arnold said in her acceptance speech, thanking her cast and crew for the “team effort” on their “great adventure.”

Meanwhile, critics’ fave and the winner by a mile of the Screen International Critics Poll (see below), German director Maren Ade’s exquisite father-daughter comedy “Toni Erdmann” (Sony Pictures Classics), came home empty-handed. At the jury press conference jury chief Miller cited a “passionate” and long jury deliberation (which Mikkelsen described as “difficult”) on 21 films, directors, writers and many more actors as well as arcane jury rules that demand that the top three winners cannot win a second prize. Miller and Mads Mikkelsen both stated that they judged the films on their excellence, not on the sex of who directed them. “Each film was judged on its merits,” said Miller. “Filmmaking is filmmaking. It did not come up, we were looking at other issues.”

The first-time director prize went to “Divines,” a gangster thriller and female buddy movie directed by Houda Benyamina (Director’s Fortnight).

The jury defended the choice of Best Actress Jaclyn Jose for “Ma’ Rosa,” from Philippine director Brillante Mendoza, which some critics had suggested was a supporting role in a sprawling ensemble. “The critics were wrong,” said Donald Sutherland. “It’s a big-time leading role.”

“She’s the film,” said Arnaud Desplechin. “She broke my heart.”

The jury admitted that there were many strong actress contenders including “I, Daniel Blake”‘s Hayley Squires and Romanian actress Maria Dragus (“Graduation”), but they couldn’t award more than one prize for winners of the top three awards.

Asghar Farhadi’s “The Salesman” (Amazon/Cohen Media) was another surprise winner, taking home two prizes, for Best Actor and Best Screenplay. Shahab Hosseini plays an actor who is in the midst of moving apartments and starring in Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” when his wife (Taraneh Alidoosti) is assaulted in the shower of their new domicile by a man who assumes that she is the former tenant, a prostitute. When the door buzzes, the wife thinks she is letting in her husband, but winds up in the hospital with more than wounds to her head and psyche — her husband is hellbent on revenge.

The Honorary Palme d’Or went to Jean-Pierre Leaud, who came to the festival with his first film “The 400 Blows” in 1959 when he was 14 years old, and was hugged by Jean Cocteau. Juror Arnaud Desplechin presented the award. Leaud said this was the most joy he had felt since Francois Truffaut told him to take the script for “The 400 Blows.”

Among those who did not need to attend the closing ceremony were Isabelle Huppert, who earned raves for Paul Verhoeven’s provocative thriller “Elle” (Sony Pictures Classics), in which she plays a videogame entrepreneur who refuses to allow her violent rape in her own home to ruin her life. Verhoeven’s first French-language film is likely to play better in North America.

Read More: Cannes 2016: Complete List of This Year’s Winners

Also left out of the awards were “Paterson” (Amazon), American auteur Jim Jarmusch’s spare and austere portrait of a bus driver poet (Adam Driver) and his wife and muse (Golshifteh Farahani), as well as Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardennes’ “The Unknown Girl” (Sundance Selects), starring Adèle Haenel as an empathetic doctor who ignores a late-hour doorbell at her private practice and finds out that the young woman was murdered nearby. She embarks on a mission to identify the girl and inform her family of her death. Park Chan-Wook’s gorgeously wrought erotic drama “The Handmaiden” (Amazon) starring Kim Min-hee and newcomer Kim Tae-ri as secret lesbian lovers was also overlooked.

Among the anticipated films that disappointed the critics at Cannes (not to mention the jury) were Sean Penn’s aid worker romance “The Last Face,” starring Javier Bardem and Charlize Theron, which was seeking a North American buyer, and Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Neon Demon” (Amazon), starring Elle Fanning, who discovers that starving models in the Los Angeles fashion world literally eat each other alive. In one memorable scene, when one x-ray model known as the bionic woman (because she has altered so much of her body) throws up an eyeball, her best friend pops it into her own mouth. (With five films at the festival, Amazon won no awards.)

At the “Neon Demon” party, when I asked Cannes director Thierry Fremaux why so many movies wound up in Competition that the critics did not like, he said that the festival was not set up for the critics, although they clearly play an important role. He said that how movies played for audiences was important too. Clearly that included the Cannes jury.

Stay on top of the all the latest headlines! Sign up for our Daily Headlines email newsletter here.  Related storiesCannes Film Festival Awards 2016Cannes Today: New Talent EmergesHow Will the Cannes Film Festival Impact the Rest of the Year in Film? (Podcast) »

- Anne Thompson

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Cannes: Ken Loach's 'I, Daniel Blake' wins Palme d'Or; full list of winners

22 May 2016 11:02 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

British filmmaker Ken Loach wins second Palme d’Or; Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman wins two.Scroll down for full list of winners

Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake has won the Palme d’Or at the 69th Cannes Film Festival (May 11-22), marking the second time the British filmmaker has won the top prize after The Wind That Shakes The Barley in 2006.

The 79-year-old filmmaker returned for a record 13th Competition entry with the tale of an injured carpenter and single mother caught in a bureaucracy nightmare within the UK welfare system.

Accepting the Palme d’Or from actor Mel Gibson, Loach used his acceptance speech to spotlight the “dangerous project of austerity”.

“We must give a message of hope, we must say another world is possible,” he said. “The world we live in is at a dangerous point right now. We are in the grip of a dangerous project of austerity driven by ideas that we »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Cannes: 'I, Daniel Blake' wins Palme d'Or; full list of winners

22 May 2016 11:02 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The time has come to award this year’s winners, including the recipient of the coveted Palme d’Or. Screen is at the ceremony… and the first winners have been announced.

Refresh this page for updates…

Palme d’Or

I, Daniel Blake, Ken Loach (UK)

Grand Prix

It’s Only The End Of The World (Juste La Fin Du Monde), Xavier Dolan (Canada)

Best Director

Olivier Assayas, Personal Shopper (France)

&

Cristian Mungiu, Graduation (Bacalaureat) (Romania)

Best Screenplay

Asghar Farhadi, The Salesman (Forushande) (Iran)

Jury Prize

American Honey, Andrea Arnold (UK)

Best Actor

Shahab Hosseini, The Salesman (Forushande)

Dir. Asghar Farhadi (Iran)

Best Actress

Jaclyn Jose, Ma’ Rosa

Dir. Brilliante Mendoza (Philippines)

Honorary Palme d’or

Jean-Pierre Léaud

Camera d’Or

Divines, Houda Benyamina

Best Short Film

Timecode, Juanjo Gimenez (Spain)

Short Film Special Mention

The Girl who Danced with the Devil (A Moça Que Dançou Com O Diabo),João Paulo Miranda Maria (Brazil)

The jury, presided over by »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Live: Cannes Film Festival winners

22 May 2016 11:02 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The time has come to award this year’s winners, including the recipient of the coveted Palme d’Or. Screen is at the ceremony… and the first winners have been announced.

Refresh this page for updates…

Grand Prix

It’s Only The End Of The World (Juste La Fin Du Monde), Xavier Dolan (Canada)

Best Director

Olivier Assayas, Personal Shopper (France)

&

Cristian Mungiu, Graduation (Bacalaureat) (Romania)

Best Screenplay

Asghar Farhadi, The Salesman (Forushande) (Iran)

Jury Prize

American Honey, Andrea Arnold (UK)

Best Actor

Shahab Hosseini, The Salesman (Forushande)

Dir. Asghar Farhadi (Iran)

Best Actress

Jaclyn Jose, Ma’ Rosa

Dir. Brilliante Mendoza (Philippines)

Honorary Palme d’or

Jean-Pierre Léaud

Camera d’Or

Divines, Houda Benyamina

Best Short Film

Timecode, Juanjo Gimenez (Spain)

Short Film Special Mention

The Girl who Danced with the Devil (A Moça Que Dançou Com O Diabo),João Paulo Miranda Maria (Brazil)

The jury, presided over by Mad Max director George Miller, is on stage »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Cannes: Ken Loach Wins His Second Palme d’Or for ‘I, Daniel Blake’

22 May 2016 10:29 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The final awards ceremony of the 69th Cannes Film Festival has concluded, with veteran British filmmaker Ken Loach winning the second Palme d’Or of his career for the impassioned protest drama “I, Daniel Blake.”

The film, chronicling the social-welfare battle fought by a struggling Newcastle carpenter, scored a strong emotional reaction from Cannes audiences when it unspooled early in the festival — though many critics were more reserved in their praise. This year’s jury, led by “Mad Max” director George Miller, evidently voted with their hearts, handing the 79-year-old Loach the festival’s top honor exactly 10 years after his Irish historical drama “The Wind That That Shakes the Barley” landed the prize.

Loach now joins an elite group of two-time Palme champs, including Michael Haneke, Francis Ford Coppola, Emir Kusturica, Bille August, Shohei Imamura, Alf Sjoberg and Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne — the latter duo among the »

- Guy Lodge and Owen Gleiberman

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Cannes Review: Brillante Mendoza’s ‘Ma’ Rosa’ Is A Bleak & Tiny Powerhouse

19 May 2016 12:56 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

“Today’s your lucky day” reads a sign on a passing truck during the opening minutes of Brillante Mendoza‘s “Ma’ Rosa.” But in truth, luck has no place in this dreary and harrowing picture, and when it’s mentioned, it’s always laced with life-sized irony. Essentially a chamber piece that seems to simmer in place for the […]

The post Cannes Review: Brillante Mendoza’s ‘Ma’ Rosa’ Is A Bleak & Tiny Powerhouse appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Nikola Grozdanovic

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Cannes 2016: Ma' Rosa review

19 May 2016 3:59 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆ Going to see a Brillante Mendoza film at the Cannes is an awkward experience. He's been granted fairly regular festival berths both here and in Venice while exhibiting to the world a series of films that foreground the poor, the powerless and the oppressed. To exit the grime and grimness of his latest, Ma' Rosa, and make your way through the supercars and the millionaires struggling to get their tuxedoed selves into the Palais is a contrast that can give you vertigo. To apply your critical faculties soberly and steadily is a genuine effort, but we must.

»

- CineVue UK

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[Cannes Review] Ma’ Rosa

18 May 2016 5:36 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Not a huge amount happens in Ma’ Rosa, the relentless new film from Filipino director Brillante Mendoza, which premieres this week in competition at Cannes. In present-day Manila, a woman and her husband are arrested for dealing methamphetamines and taken to the police station for interrogation before rounding up their three children who, in turn, must collect the sufficient sum of money to bail them out. It’s a bit of a slog, not least in the first half, but it’s also the kind of film that seeps into the viewer in the minutes and hours and days afterwards. Returning to the style and locale that brought him international acclaim with Kinatay in 2009, Mendoza shoots it like a pseudo-documentary, employing erratic, grainy handheld camerawork and relatively few cuts. Critics often say he’s an uncompromising director. It’s easy to see why.

Jaclyn Jose plays Rosa, the titular matriarch »

- Rory O'Connor

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Cannes Film Review: Ma’ Rosa

18 May 2016 3:23 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

After recreating the 2001 Dos Palmas kidnapping incident by Islamic separatists in “Captive” (2012), Filipo auteur Brillante Mendoza’s “Ma’ Rosa” is an equally political hostage drama in which small-time drug-sellers are detained by police extorting a payout. As an indictment of the ubiquity of the country’s corruption and the banality of evil, it’s neither as harrowing as his own “Kinatay” nor as stylish as compatriot Erik Matti’s noir crime thrillers. Still, as in most of the director’s repertoire, he portrays working class family relations with unpretentious warmth. Boasting a simple, coherent plot shot with real-time, handheld verismo, it’s a work of understated confidence that will not disappoint his festival acolytes, but probably won’t win many new converts.

Crafted with input from screenwriting guru Armando “Bing” Lao (who collaborated with Mendoza on “Serbis” and “Kinatay”), the structure of Troy Espiritu’s script harks back to the hyper-realism of “Slingshot, »

- Maggie Lee

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Ma'Rosa review: a cold, hard look at what it means to be poor

18 May 2016 12:53 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Filipino director Brillante Mendoza’s social realist drama takes us to the dark heart of police corruption in Manila, but never really gets inside the victims’ heads

The Filipino director Brillante Mendoza is one of Cannes’ established auteur film-makers, and his new movie here, entitled Ma’Rosa, returns us to the themes of his violent shocker Kinatay from 2009 — the cynicism and corruption of the police and the city authorities, the casual violence and the desperation of the ruled-over who must make what accommodation they can with those in power. It is a tough social realist slice of life at ground level in Manila, unfolding in what feels like real time: violent, though perhaps less so than in that notorious earlier movie and with a droll habit of transcribing the banal conversations of police officers as they deal what they consider to be their paperwork. I wonder if Mendoza hasn’t »

- Peter Bradshaw

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‘Ma’ Rosa’ Cannes Review: It’s Ugly, and That’s the Point

17 May 2016 5:13 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

You have to give “Ma’ Rosa” points for this: Filipino director Brillante Mendoza’s neorealist indictment of police corruption looks unlike any other film playing in Cannes’ Official Competition. It’s just that what sets the film apart is its visual ugliness. “Ma’ Rosa” certainly follows all the tenets of the neorealist movement. It is shot with portable, inexpensive equipment on location in Manila’s poorest neighborhoods. It follows the working poor into intractable knot of public corruption meant to provoke outrage and indict all levels of society. But where those early Italian predecessors were shot on black & white film (limited means or. »

- Ben Croll

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Ma’ Rosa: Powerful, Artifice-Free Drama from the Gutters is This Year’s Reality Check

17 May 2016 4:53 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Last year, we got underdog “Dheepan” and “Dheepan” got the Palme D’Or.

This year, the same day saw the bourgeois artifice of Pedro Almodóvar’s uninspiring “Julieta”, “Aquarius” from Brazil that fetishes its glamorous, ageing bourgeois muse in a quasi Almodovarian fashion, and small-time Manila drug-dealer drama “Ma’ Rosa” from the Philippines’ Brillante Mendoza screening in the official competition. “Ma’ Rosa” is the film that so far comes closest to the ethos of “Dheepan” – ditching the gimmicks (“Ma Loute”s cannibals anyone?), the glamour (that will be 5000 Euro for two bags and a belt and Kristen Stewart won’t bat an eyelid in “Personal Shopper”), the muse overdose (we get that Sonia Braga has divine hair in the first half hour of “Aquarius”), and transporting us to an Asian slum where the characters need to scrape for their existence. I already slated Ken Loach for his insipid instalment of »

- Zornitsa Staneva

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Southeast Asia directors line up art-inspired omnibus

16 May 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The five award-winning directors will each make a short film inspired by a piece of art from their region.

National Gallery Singapore has announced an unprecedented collaboration with five award-winning Southeast Asian filmmakers – Apichatpong Weerasethakul [pictured] (Thailand), Brilliante Mendoza (Philippines), Eric Khoo (Singapore), Ho Yuhang (Malaysia) and Joko Anwar (Indonesia).

The five directors will create Art Through Our Eyes, an omnibus for which the directors each pick a masterpiece from the region to inspire their short films.

Initiated by Khoo with the Gallery, the project of dramatized interpretations aims to connect with audiences worldwide to deepen their appreciation for Southeast Asian art.

The directors are all festival favorites. Weerasethakul’s Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives won the Palme d’Or in 2010 in Cannes while his Tropical Malady won a jury prize in 2004.

Mendoza won the Best Director at Cannes in 2009 for Kinatay; Khoo’s My Magic was in Cannes competition in 2008 and his Be With Me opened »

- hjnoh2007@gmail.com (Jean Noh)

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Vincent Cassel, Romain Duris, Sandrine Kiberlain Boards ‘Fleuve Noir’ (Exclusive)

16 May 2016 9:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A topnotch French cast, including stars Vincent Cassel, Romain Duris (“Heartbreaker”) and Sandrine Kiberlain (“Being 17”), will topline Erick Zonca’s French drama “Fleuve Noir.”

Cassel is one of France’s biggest stars, with films such as Darren Aronofsky’s “Black Swan,” Maiwenn’s “Mon Roi” and the upcoming “Jason Bourne.” In “Fleuve Noir,” Cassel will star as a disillusioned cop who starts investigating the death of a child when his estranged delinquent son walks back into his life.

Films Distribution has taken international sales rights and is co-producing the film, which is being produced by Olivier Delbosc’s Paris-based shingle Curiosa.

“‘Fleuve Noir’ marks our first collaboration with Curiosa and we expect there will be many more to come. Olivier Delbosc and I have known each other for 20 years and we have similar tastes,” said Nicolas Brigaud-Robert, co-founder of Films Distribution, which has three films playing in Cannes: Brillante Mendoza’s competition title “Ma’Rosa, »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Movie Poster of the Week: The Posters of the 2016 Cannes Competition

14 May 2016 6:38 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: The Handmaiden by Park Chan-wook (South Korea).As I always do around this time of year, I have attempted to round up as many posters as possible for the films in competition for the Cannes Film Festival's Palme d’Or. Not an easy task, given that some films may barely have finished a final edit before the print (sorry, hard drive) is couriered to the Croisette, so key art may be the last thing on a producer’s mind.The competition is full of both usual suspects (Loach, Almodóvar, Assayas, the Dardennes, Brilliante Mendoza) and some nice surprises (like the long-awaited follow-up to Neighboring Sounds by Kleber Mendonça Filho, and the first feature film in a decade from the 77-year-old Paul Verhoeven). I am especially pleased to see new films from two of my favorite filmmakers, Andrea Arnold and Maren Ade, as well as the two great Romanian auteurs Cristian Mungiu and Cristi Piui. »

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Across The Croisette: A Brief History of the Directors' Fortnight

12 May 2016 6:37 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Last year, the three-part, six-hours-and-twenty-two minutes long epic Arabian Nights by Portuguese director Miguel Gomes rejected a slot in the Cannes Film Festival’s second-rung Un Certain Regard section, opting instead to be premiered  at the Directors’ Fortnight (Quinzaine des Réalisateurs ), taking place in the same French Riviera city at the same time. Why wasn’t Arabian Nights in Cannes’ official competition? Gomes’ previous film, Tabu, won two prizes at the Berlin International Film Festival, finished 2nd Sight & Sound’s and Cinema Scope’s polls of the best films of 2012, 10th in the Village Voice’s, and 11th in both Film Comment’s and Indiewire’s; he was exactly the kind of rising art-house star who should have been competing in the most prominent part of the official festival. But organizers balked at the idea of offering such a lengthy film a slot in competition where two or three others could be chosen, »

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Weekly Rushes. Godard Biopic, Film Comment Editors, Jarmusch Clips, Radiohead's "The Wicker Man"

4 May 2016 6:22 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.NEWSLa chinoiseSay what? The Artist director Michel Hazanavicius is slated to make a drama out of the relationship between French New Wave master Jean-Luc Godard and his actress/muse-one-time-wife Anne Wiazemsky around the time of Godard's 1967 film, La chinoise. Sounds potentially horrible, but it is officially based on Wiazemsky's memoir Un an après. In a bizarre generational echo, Louis Garrel, so well known for embodying his father, director Philippe Garrel, in is set to star as Godard.We keep waiting, and waiting, and waiting for Terrence Malick long-in-the-making IMAX documentary, Voyage of Time. Now The Film Stage has found reference to an October theatrical release date. We'll believe it when we see it, but here's hoping.After Gavin Smith left editorship of Film Comment magazine, the Film Society of Lincoln »

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