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Rushes. Gilliam Wraps "Quixote", Soderbergh Returns to Moviemaking, Scorsese Stands Up for Cinema

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSFrom Terry Gilliam's Facebook page comes some of the unlikeliest news in the history of cinema: "After 17 years, we have completed the shoot of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. Muchas gracias to all the team and believers." We'll believe it when we see it, but boy do we want to see it!In other long-in-making news but from the other side of the film industry, American avant-garde filmmaker Nathaniel Dorsky has revealed that he has edited old footage shot on the now-discontinued Kodachrome 16mm film stock into five new films (!), including "a document from the weeks that Stan Brakhage was dying..." Hopefully we will get to see these in the festivals and venues for alternative cinema where Dorsky's fans usually savor his work.The New York Asian Film Festival, the United States's
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Tokyo Film Festival taps new director

Veteran Japanese film executive to head up festival, which will undergo several changes in 2017.

The Tokyo Film Festival has tapped up Takeo Hisamatsu (pictured) to head up the 30th edition of the festival later this year.

Hisamatsu, who was formerly an executive managing director at Shochiku Co. and deputy general manager of Warner Bros. Pictures Japan, will replace outgoing Director General Yasushi Shiina, who held the top post at the Tokyo festival for four years.

With a nearly 40 year track record in the film business, Hisamatsu is currently the president of his own company My Way Movies.

In recent years, Hisamatsu has played a role in such productions as the 2013 Japanese remake of the Clint Eastwood western Unforgiven, Miwa Nishikawa’s 2009 comedy-drama Dear Doctor and Bushi No Ichibun, Yoji Yamada’s 2006 semi-prequel to Zatoichi.

“It is my hope that through this festival, we can continue to present films from around the world in all their diversity and richness
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Emily Beecham-starring 'Daphne' goes to France, China

  • ScreenDaily
Emily Beecham-starring 'Daphne' goes to France, China
Exclusive: The Bureau Sales inks deal with fledgling French distributor Mag Distribution.

French outfit The Bureau Sales has closed deals on Daphne at this week’s European Film Market (Efm) in Berlin.

The film has sold for France to Mag Distribution, the newly-launched distribution company set up by Richard Magnien, Emmanuel Agneray and Yann Gilbert.

The acquisition is part of the company’s debut slate which also includes Radu Jude’s 2016 Locarno premiere Scarred Hearts and Miwa Nishikawa’s Long Excuses, which premiered at Tiff last year.

Daphne has also sold to China with Bilibili. Previous deals closed on the title include Altitude for the UK and Cinemien for Benelux.

The film stars Emily Beecham as a 30-something woman living in London whose life enters a downward spiral after she witnesses a violent attack.

It marks the feature debut of director Peter Mackie Burns, who won a Berlin Golden Bear in 2005 for his short film Milk. [link
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90th Kinema Junpo Awards

The award ceremony for the oldest Japanese cinema competition took place on February 5 at the Bunkyo Civic Center, and the list of winners is:

Best Actor: Yuya Yagira (Destruction Babies)

Best Actress: Rie Miyazawa (Her Love Boils Bath Water)

Best Supporting Actor: Pistol Takehara (The Long Excuse)

Best Supporting Actress: Hana Sugisaki (Her Love Boils Bath Water)

Best Director: Sunao Katabuchi (In This Corner of the World)

Best Director (Foreign): Clint Eastwood (Sully)

Best Screenplay: Hideaki Anno (Shin Godzilla)

Best New Actor: Nijiro Murakami (Destruction Babies, Natsumi no Hotaru)

Best New Actress: Nana Komatsu (Oboreru Knife, Destruction Babies)

Best Ten Japanese Feature Films

In This Corner of the World (Sunao Katabuchi)

Shin Godzilla (Shinji Higuchi/Hideaki Anno)

Harmonium (Koji Fukada)

Destruction Babies (Mariko Tetsuya)

Long Excuse (Miwa Nishikawa)

The Bride of Rip Van Winkle (Shunji Iwai)

Her Love Boils Bath Water (Ryota Nakano)

Creepy (Kiyoshi Kurosawa)

Over the Fence
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Miwa Nishikawa’s “The Long Excuse” is a very entertaining film with one fault

Sachio Kinugasa is a formerly successful writer who currently makes his living by appearing on talk shows. He is married to a hairstylist, Natsuko, but constantly ignores her while he is having an affair with his editor. His life turns upside down when Natsuko is killed in a bus accident, along with her friend Yuko. The two widowers, Sachio and Yoichi deal with the incident in completely different fashion. Sachio tries to “seduce” the media once more, while Yoichi is utterly devastated. However, due to Yoichi’s efforts to become friends with him, the two men start socializing, and eventually Sachio agrees to act as a babysitter for Yoichi’s two kids, Shinpei and Akari. As he starts warming up to them, Sachio realizes the mistakes he has made in his life, particularly regarding his deceased wife.

Miwa Nishikawa directs and pens (actually adapts her own book) a touching movie that starts as a drama,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

’10th Five Flavours Festival’ Asian Film Festival

For 10 years, Five Flavours Film Festival has been presenting the best cinema from Asia, its meanings and contexts. Initially, the Festival focused solely on Vietnamese films, but it evolved to become a yearly review of the cinema of East and Southeast Asia, the only such event in the country.

The 10th edition is held in Warsaw, on November 16-23 (Muranów and Kinoteka cinemas), and in Wrocław on November 18-24 (New Horizons Cinema).

This year’s edition of Five Flavours is the biggest in history – it presents over 40 productions. The program combines artistic and commercial cinema, allowing the audience to experience the best Asian films have to offer. On the one hand, there are the intimate stories with a social angle, on the other – fresh, innovative blockbusters, filled with the sheer joy of cinematic creation, attracting millions of viewers in their homelands.

Three

This diversity is already visible in the choice
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Rome: 'The Accountant', 'Birth Of A Nation' among line-up

Rome: 'The Accountant', 'Birth Of A Nation' among line-up
Guests attending this year to include Bernardo Bertolucci, Don DeLillo, Ralph Fiennes.Scroll down for full line-up

The Rome Film Festival (Oct 13-23) has revealed its line-up for 2016.

The festival will present 44 films and documentaries in its official programme, selected from 26 countries.

Rome will open with Barry JenkinsMoonlight, which premiered in Toronto.

Further titles in the Official Selection include Gavin O’Connor’s The Accountant [pictured], starring Ben Affleck and Anna Kendrick, Nate Parker’s The Birth Of A Nation, Kenneth Lonergan’s Manchester By The Sea, and Oliver Stone’s Snowden.

The festival’s previously announced Alice In The City line-up will include John Carney’s Sing Street and Matt Ross’s Captain Fantastic.

The Everybody’s Talking About It strand, which highlights films that has generated exceptional buzz following their international debuts, will showcase Yeon Sang-ho’s Train To Busan, Michael Grandage’s Genius, David Mackenzie’s Hell Or High Water, and [link=nm
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Toronto Film Review: ‘The Long Excuse’

Toronto Film Review: ‘The Long Excuse’
In “The Long Excuse,” Masahiro Motoki — star of the Oscar-winning “Departures” — makes a startling comeback as a novelist who discovers his coldheartedness upon his wife’s sudden death. Writer-director Miwa Nishikawa’s somber reflection on the strains of marriage and parenthood is punctuated with beautiful existential undertones. Given the proliferation of of quality Japanese family dramas at home and on the festival circuit, this little gem with a spiky edge will need extra marketing savvy to find limited arthouse theatrical and on-demand deals.

A director noted for her flair for suspense and enthralling portrayal of characters of dubious morality, Nishikawa first composed the story as a novel, then wrote and directed it for the screen. As in her last three films — “Sway,” “Dear Doctor,” and “Dreams for Sale,” all centered on liars and swindlers — self-deception is the theme of her fifth work.

Showing a bit of wear and tear after
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Toronto: Elle Driver takes sales on Miwa Nishikawa's 'The Long Excuse'

Toronto: Elle Driver takes sales on Miwa Nishikawa's 'The Long Excuse'
Exclusive: Fifth film from Hirokazu Koreeda protégé stars Masahiro Motoki.

Paris-based Elle Driver has snapped up international sales on Japanese director Miwa Nishikawa’s heart-warming drama The Long Excuse ahead of its world premiere in Toronto’s Special Presentations strand.

Popular Japanese actor Masahiro Matoki - best known internationally for his performance in the 2008 Oscar-winning film Departures - plays Sachio Kinugasa, a popular writer coming to terms with the death of his wife in a bus crash alongside a friend.

Sachio had long checked out of his loveless marriage and was with another woman at the moment of his wife’s death so he has to fake his grief to keep up appearances.

The true implications of his loss are brought into sharp relief, however, when Sachio meets the devastated husband of his wife’s friend and offers to look after their children so the latter - a truck-driver - can go back to work.

It is the
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‘The Long Excuse’ Exclusive Trailer: Miwa Nishikawa’s Tiff Feature Builds a Family Drama from Tragedy

  • Indiewire
Miwa Nishikawa is no stranger to the Toronto International Film Festival, as her last film, “Dream for Sale,” was screened at Tiff in 2012. Now, the Japanese director and screenwriter is back with her latest film “The Long Excuse,” based on her novel of the same name.

The drama stars Masahiro Motoki as Sachio Kinugasa, a popular writer who is widowed after his wife (Eri Fukatsu) dies in a bus accident. Coming to terms with his grief, or lack of it, he offers to take care of another man’s children who also lost their mother in the same incident.

The film will be screened at Tiff on Saturday, September 17 and 18 and IndieWire has an exclusive new trailer that you can check out below.

Read More: ‘These Days’ Exclusive Trailer: Giuseppe Piccioni’s Venice Drama Follows The Complicated Bonds of Friendship

“The Long Excuse” is executive produced by Kazumi Kawashiro, Yasuhito Nakae,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘These Days’ Exclusive Trailer: Giuseppe Piccioni’s Venice Drama Follows The Complicated Bonds of Friendship

  • Indiewire
‘These Days’ Exclusive Trailer: Giuseppe Piccioni’s Venice Drama Follows The Complicated Bonds of Friendship
In 2001, Giuseppe Piccioni’s romantic drama “Light of My Eyes” was screened at the Venice Film Festival, where it took home the Best Actor and Actress Awards. Now, the Italian director returns to the festival with his film “These Days” (“Questi giorni”), which will compete for the Golden Lion.

Starring Laura Adriani, Margherita Buy and Giulio Corso, “These Days” follows four girls who go on an adventure together to Belgrade, where a mysterious friend and an improbable work opportunity are waiting. Their friendship is based not on overwhelming passions, mutual interests or great ideals but rather on habits, occasional enthusiasms, harmless contrasts and feelings cultivated in secret.

Ahead of its premiere at Venice, IndieWire has a new trailer for the upcoming drama, which highlights the friends’ journey as they come to appreciate their present lives.

Read More: ‘As I Open My Eyes’ Exclusive Clip: A Coming-of-Age Story Set Against The
See full article at Indiewire »

Toronto Film Festival Adds Movies From James Franco, Terrence Malick, Ken Loach

Toronto Film Festival Adds Movies From James Franco, Terrence Malick, Ken Loach
New offerings from the likes of Ken Loach, Terrence Malick, and Walter Hill have been added to the Toronto International Film Festival lineup.

The filmmakers join a previously announced group of heavy-hitters that includes Oliver Stone, Rob Reiner, Jeff Nichols, and Kenneth Lonergan. Loach will offer up “I, Daniel Blake,” a comedy drama about a laborer who falls ill, which premiered at last spring’s Cannes Film Festival. Malick will screen “Voyage of Time: Life’s Journey,” a documentary look at the planets. And Hill will be in full neo-noir mode, premiering, “(Re)Assignment,” a revenge story about an assassin who is betrayed by gangsters.

James Franco, Hollywood’s favorite polymath, will debut his latest exploration of the literary canon — “In Dubious Battle,” the John Steinbeck novel about a migrant workers’ uprising. Other works of note include “Christine,” the story of a reporter’s on-air suicide from Antonio Campos (“Simon Killer”), and “The Exception,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Toronto unveils City To City, World Cinema, Masters line-ups

  • ScreenDaily
Nigerian metropolis Lagos is the focus of the eighth City To City showcase at the Toronto International Film Festival (Tiff) as top brass anoint two international Rising Stars.

Tiff’s latest line-up announcement also featured extra selections in Galas and Special Presentations, among them Walter Hill’s (Re)Assignment, Philippe Falardeau’s The Bleeder, David Leveaux’ The Exception (pictured), Ken Loach’s Palme d’Or winner I, Daniel Blake and Terry George’s drama The Promise.

A vibrant crop of Contemporary World Cinema entries includes Kleber Mendonça Filho’s Aquarius, Danis Tanović’s Death In Sarajevo, Marie Noëlle’s Marie Curie, The Courage Of Knowledge and Akin Omotoso’s Vaya.

Hirokazu Kore-eda brings After The Storm to the Masters showcase, alongside Marco Bellocchio’s Sweet Dreams, Pedro Almodóvar’s Julieta, Cristian Mungiu’s Graduation, Gianfranco Rosi’s Berlin Golden Bear winner Fire At Sea and Adoor Gopalakrishnan’s Once Again.

Rounding out the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Toronto unveils line-ups for City To City, Contemporary World Cinema, Masters

  • ScreenDaily
Nigerian capital Lagos is the focus of the eighth City To City showcase at the Toronto International Film Festival (Tiff) as top brass anoint two international Rising Stars.

Tiff’s latest line-up announcement also featured extra selections in Galas and Special Presentations, among them Walter Hill’s (Re)Assignment, Philippe Falardeau’s The Bleeder, David Leveaux’ The Exception (pictured), Ken Loach’s Palme d’Or winner I, Daniel Blake and Terry George’s drama The Promise.

A vibrant crop of Contemporary World Cinema entries includes Kleber Mendonça Filho’s Aquarius, Danis Tanović’s Death In Sarajevo, Marie Noëlle’s Marie Curie, The Courage Of Knowledge and Akin Omotoso’s Vaya.

Hirokazu Kore-eda brings After The Storm to the Masters showcase, alongside Marco Bellocchio’s Sweet Dreams, Pedro Almodóvar’s Julieta, Cristian Mungiu’s Graduation, Gianfranco Rosi’s Berlin Golden Bear winner Fire At Sea and Adoor Gopalakrishnan’s Once Again.

Rounding out the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Tiff Adds ‘I, Daniel Blake,’ ‘Julieta,’ ‘Personal Shopper,’ ‘The Unknown Girl,’ ‘Voyage of Time’ And Many More

The Toronto International Film Festival is mere weeks from kicking off, yet the annual fall fest is showing zero sign of slowing down when it comes to announcing the titles that will round out this year’s event. Today’s announcement brings with it a number of Cannes favorites, including Ken Loach’s Palme d’Or-winning “I, Daniel Blake,” Olivier Assayas’ divisive Kristen Stewart-starring “Personal Shopper” and Pedro Almodovar’s “Julieta.”

Read More: Tiff Reveals First Slate of 2016 Titles, Including ‘Magnificent Seven,’ ‘American Honey,’ ‘La La Land’ and ‘Birth of A Nation’

The slate will also play home to the Dardenne Brothers’ latest, “The Unknown Girl,” which has reportedly been through an edit since it debuted at Cannes earlier this year. Other standouts from Cannes include Kleber Mendonça Filho’s “Aquarius,” Boo Junfeng’s “Apprentice,” Cristian Mungiu’s “Graduation,” Brillante Ma Mendoza’s “Ma’ Rosa” and Cristi Puiu’s “Sieranevada.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Departures’ Star Masahiro Motoki on Board for Miwa Nishikawa’s ‘Long Excuse’

‘Departures’ Star Masahiro Motoki on Board for Miwa Nishikawa’s ‘Long Excuse’
Tokyo – “Departures” star Masahiro Motoki will head the cast of hot auteur Miwa Nishikawa’s new film “The Long Excuse.”

The movie is a drama based on her own novel about a writer in mourning after losing his wife in an accident.

Motoki, played the apprentice undertaker in the 2008 Oscar winner “Departures.”

Eri Fukatsu, who starred in Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Cannes entry “Journey to the Shore,” will play the writer’s wife. Pistol Takehara, a boxer turned performer, plays the writer’s similarly bereaved truck driver acquaintance.

The film was presented at Busan’s Asian Project Market last year and is scheduled to wrap in December. It is set for a 2016 release with Asmik Ace Entertainment distributing.

Nishikawa’s previous work includes the 2012 “Dreams for Sale,” which premiered at Toronto and also screened at festivals in Vancouver, London and New York.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Review - Dreams for Sale (2012)

Dreams for Sale (Japan: Yume uru futari), 2012.

Written and Directed by Miwa Nishikawa.

Starring Teruyuki Kagawa, Yûsuke Iseya and Takako Matsu.

Synopsis:

Married couple Kanya and Satoko are left devastated when their izakaya restaurant burns to the ground. Kanya’s continuous drunken stupor and rejection of his wife’s optimism leads to a drunken one-night stand. Initially angry, Satoko soon sees in Kanya’s betrayal a means to finance their dream of a new restaurant.

Dreams for Sale concludes the end of a three year absence from filmmaking for Japanese director Miwa Nishikawa. A celebrated filmmaker within contemporary Japanese cinema, her 2009 nomination for a Naoki Literature award set her aside as an accomplished storyteller across narrative mediums. Dreams for Sale is a tale of marriage fraud, though Nishikawa has admitted that it is a fictionalised account of the subject.

Perhaps best known for her performance of a vengeful school teacher in 2009’s Confessions,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Jff Review: Dreams For Sale Has Lingering Thoughts On Humanity

I caught Dreams for Sale as part of the fantastic lineup of the Japanese Film Festival in Melbourne (and other places in Australia). I feel compelled to write about it as it has stayed with me since viewing it.There is a spectre haunting Japan. Miwa Nishikawa's tragic and foreboding Dreams for Sale begins with this invisible force, affecting the lives of seemingly unrelated people in distressing ways before settling on a busy scene in a restaurant; a stable business co-owned by a young idealistic couple. Moments later, through sheer misfortune and human error the restaurant is decimated by an accidental fire; their reputation in ruins, their dreams up in smoke.Propelled by extreme stress and cynicism, they concoct a strange plan to rebuild their shattered finances;...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

London Film Festival 2012: Dreams For Sale Review

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

A montage of aspiration – the opening image in Dreams for Sale – ends with a restaurant aflame, representing the ruined lives of young married couple Kanya and Satoko. In subsequent scenes, we observe how the pair are opposite poles in terms of world-view; Satoko remains optimistic, taking a job to try and make the best of it, while Kanya settles into a depressive lull, feeling unworthy of his wife and lying to friends about the state of the business.

Everything changes when Kanya drunkenly has a one-night stand with a similarly downtrodden woman he meets on the subway, and overwhelmed with emotion and sympathy, she ends up giving him some of her newly-acquired cash. Satoko soon enough finds out, and in an ironic twist, encourages him to repeat his behaviour, in order that he might be able to scam money from other desperate women. A concept this
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