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Tony Kushner Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (14) | Personal Quotes (4)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 16 July 1956New York City, New York, USA
Birth NameAnthony Robert Kushner
Height 6' 1½" (1.87 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Tony Kushner's play "Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes" earned him the Pulitzer Prize, among many other awards. His other acclaimed plays include "Slavs", "Homebody/Kabul" and "Caroline, or Change". He has collaborated with children's author and illustrator Maurice Sendak on several books. In 2003, Kushner married his boyfriend, Mark Harris, editor at large of Entertainment Weekly; they were the first gay couple to be featured in The New York Times' "Vows" column.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Anonymous

Spouse (1)

Mark Harris (27 April 2003 - present)

Trivia (14)

Biography/bibliography in: "Contemporary Authors". New Revision Series, Vol. 130, pp. 240-246. Farmington Hills, MI: Thomson Gale, 2005.
Won two Tony Awards as the author of the Best Play winner two years in a row: in 1993 for "Angels in America: Millennium Approaches" and in 1994 for "Angels in America: Perestroika". He was also twice-nominated in 2004 for "Caroline, or Change:" as Best Book of a Musical and as Best Score (Music and/or Lyrics), the latter with collaborator Jeanine Tesori.
In Tony Kushner's play "Angels in America," when an angel crashes through Prior Walter's ceiling in a spectacular shower of light and masonry, Walter exclaims, "God almighty...very Steven Spielberg!" Kushner and Spielberg later worked together on Munich (2005) and Lincoln (2012).
Brandeis University awarded him an honorary Doctorate in 2006. This decision was the source of some controversy among some conservative members of the Brandeis student body, faculty, staff, and alumni who objected to Kushner because they perceived his co-authorship of Munich (2005) and some of his stated views to be anti-Israel and anti-Semitic. Kushner responded with a letter to the editor of the Jewish newspaper "The Forward" in which he said that he is "a proud Jew, a Jewish-American man" who "love[s] Israel," but whose "opinions about Israel are characterized by a serious ambivalence." Kushner was also quoted in Newsweek as saying that his statements about Israel have been taken out of context and "anybody who thinks there's a simple line to be taken on the Middle East is an idiot." Despite the protests, Brandeis pledged to go ahead and award the honorary degree to Kushner.
He was awarded an honorary doctorate from Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts in May 2006.
Invited to join AMPAS in 2006.
Was born in New York City but spent his whole childhood (until college) in Lake Charles, Louisiana.
His play, "Angels in American: Millennium Approaches and Perestroika", was awarded the 1995 Joseph Jefferson Award for Play Production in Chicago, Illinois.
His play, "Angels in America: Parts I and II", at the Journeymen Theatre in Chicago, Illinois was awarded the 1998 Joseph Jefferson Award for Play Production.
Won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the play "Angels in America: Millennium Approaches".
His musical, "Caroline, or Change", at the Court Theatre in Chicago, Illinois was awarded the 2009 Joseph Jefferson Award for Best Production of a Musical in a Large Venue.
Pierre Corneille and his play, "The Illusion", at the Court Theatre in Chicago, Illinois was nominated for a 2010 Joseph Jefferson Award for Production of a Play (Large).
His play, "Angels in America: Parts I and II" at the Court Theatre in Chicago, Illinois was nominated for a 2012 Equity Joseph Jefferson Award for Play Production (Large).
On Wednesday, July 10, 2013, President Obama awarded a 2012 National Medal of Arts and National Humanities Medal to Kushner in the East Room of the White House. The citation said: "Tony Kushner for his contributions to American theater and film. Whether for the stage or the silver screen, his scripts have moved audiences worldwide, marrying humor to fury, history to fantasy, and the philosophical to the personal.".

Personal Quotes (4)

[on Meryl Streep's open-air performance in 'Mother Courage and Her Children'] The set was mostly dirt, so by the end of the evening it was mud, and Meryl incorporated it into her performance. Thinking of her slogging around in the mud singing 'The Song of the Great Capitulation' is one of my favorite memories of any theater that I've had anything to do with.
[on his Oscar nomination for Munich (2005) screenplay] We had a great time because we sort of knew we weren't going to win anything; we were just there for the fun of it. I got to meet a lot of people whose work I really admire. I was very moved to see) Larry McMurtry and to see him and his partner [Diana Ossana] win for Brokeback Mountain (2005). And we stayed at the Pavilion, and they made a chocolate version of the Oscar and put it in your room, whether you win or lose.
[on Daniel Day-Lewis] Daniel carries his talents and achievements modestly, charmingly, and generously. Like the president he brought to life in 'Lincoln', he's a deep-sea creature who's unexpectedly approachable and thoroughly delightful company. He's a concerned and active world citizen, a spectacular husband and father. But when Daniel acts, he makes the physical metaphysical, and vice versa. He's an actor-creator whose performances aren't just great - they're essential.
[on his Oscar nomination for Lincoln (2012)] I'm tremendously honored to be a nominee in the company of so many writers and filmmakers whose work I admire. I'm very grateful to Steven and Kathy, to Daniel, Sally, Tommy Lee and the whole cast, to Rick, Joanna, Janusz, Mike and John and everyone who made Lincoln happen. I'm overwhelmed by the Academy's response to the film. I heard that I'd been nominated while waiting to take off on a plane from JFK to LAX. James Gandolfini, who's sitting in front of me, gave me a hug and a kiss, so I'm about as happy as can be.

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