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Rhys Darby Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (2) | Personal Quotes (38)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 21 March 1974New Zealand
Birth NameRhys Montague Darby
Height 5' 10" (1.78 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Rhys Darby was born on March 21, 1974 in New Zealand as Rhys Montague Darby. He is an actor and writer, known for Yes Man (2008), Pirate Radio (2009) and What We Do in the Shadows (2014). He is married to Rosie Carnahan-Darby. They have two children.

Spouse (1)

Rosie Carnahan-Darby (? - present) (2 children)

Trivia (2)

Was in the New Zealand army from 1991-1994.
He and wife Rosie Carnahan have a son - Finn - born in 2006.

Personal Quotes (38)

It's a funny thing because it's what the people say when they come across a ghost situation is that it does freak you out, but then you do get over it - for some reason you're not scared to come across it again.
I get them [auditions] from time to time, and I sometimes get auditions for big dramas, and I often think, well, I'm not going to get that part. This was a big surprise - it was The X-Files.
I think that's one of the reasons people love The X-Files, because most people do believe that there's something else going on that we don't know, because life is just too bizarre to be the way it is.
I was an adult and I was in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. I was performing in this cave - they used to bury the plague victims in these caves underneath the streets of Edinburgh, when I got this weird cold sensation up my spine, it gave me this really weird feeling, and then I looked up and there was this white, sudden white shape, that just zapped from me and went straight to the light that was at the back of the room, and I just stopped cold and said to the audience, "Did you guys see that?" No one saw it.
When I was a kid I thought I saw a ghost in the forest when I was on a bush walk, like a walk through the forest. I saw something weird pass from one side of the track to the other, and it was sort of a white, blurry... it's hard to describe, really, something that was almost see-through but it just moved in front of me. It was definitely something you could tell was there, and it really freaked me out. I think I was probably 10, and I ran all the way home.
One time we stayed at a B&B, and there were a couple of hippies who had this nice little area and they let us sleep in their beds that they had in the back. Then the woman suggested we go out and lie on some cushions and look up at the stars and look for UFOs and she said, "You know, I do this all the time," and I was like, "Okay..." So there we are, lying there next to this amazing loch, and we're looking up in the stars and I don't really know what I was expecting, but to see some sort of metallic object.
I've seen UFOs, and Loch Ness - I've been to Loch Ness a few times looking for Nessie, and that's also a beautiful place to be.
When I do the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, I always go across to Loch Ness and stay there.
You're thrown to the side and then you think, oh, there's more to life than what we really can just see in front of us. There's something else going on.
I've never really been into ghosts or spirits, and I've only had a couple of those kind of experiences.
I've had a couple of ghost experiences, but I'm not a big fan of the spiritual side of things, of the ghost type thing. I don't know why, maybe it freaks me out a bit, or I'm more into tangible, physical beings rather than things that can pass through walls.
I do want to come across something, I do want to feel something and see something.
I tried my best [on audition for X-Files], and it worked out. I got the part. So I was flabbergasted.
I was in the New Zealand army for like four years, the exact period of when it was on the air, so I never saw it.
I am very much into the paranormal.
I'm quite a good reader of people; I like to meet people, and I can tell if they're lying or not, and I've certainly had interviews with people in this radio show I've done that swear they've seen things or have had bizarre experiences with creatures, and so I think they're telling the truth.
For anyone who's a fan of the X-files show - I mean, I have the ultimate role. I got to deal with Mulder, I got to talk to him, I had a fight sequence with him. Really for anyone who is a fan of the show, I think I fulfilled a lot of young boys' dreams.
I guess, on my list, going back to some old American stuff and British stuff that I used to love in the '80s, would be a British show called Dad's Army, which recently just turned into a movie.
In New Zealand we had this colossal squid, which was discovered just off the shores of New Zealand, between New Zealand and Antarctica back in 2003. It's the biggest squid ever found, and I know that there's things living down in the depths of the ocean that do explain the Kraken - you know, these giant things that people saw back in the day, that could take ships down - and so I know that there's stuff out there, and I like the idea that we haven't solved everything yet.
Luckily the script [of X-files episode] was written wonderfully and that became who I was and I was quirky, and I was kind of agitated and not entirely happy, but at the same time, witty.
I'm probably a monster-of-the-week guy, and that comes back down to my old favorite show, which as a kid was always Scooby-Doo.
I missed the whole thing [X-files series]. And I know it went for nine seasons, and I think I saw bits and pieces of it in maybe season seven or eight or something, and then was very busy doing whatever else, stand-up comedy and stuff throughout the world. Now I'm watching the show right from the beginning.
I missed Breaking Bad and people just go on and on about it until you're blue in the face with envy and you've got to watch it.
I've been to Loch Ness three times, I've done a fair amount of research on the Chupacabra and things like that, so I've actually done a bit of the sort of paranormal investigation that happens on this show [X-Files].
Now I'm a big fan [of X-files]. I had to see what all the fuss is about, and I love it.
I believe that there are definitely creatures out there in this world that we haven't classified yet, and whether or not they can transcend dimensions is yet to be seen, but I... well, to put it simply, I want to believe in that kind of stuff.
I've always been into monsters.
I've always been a big fan of the Yeti, simply because I have an affiliation to Everest - who was the New Zealander, Sir Edmund Hillary, the guy that conquered it. He actually went on an expedition after the Everest climb to look for the Yeti, and they didn't find it, but they found a footprint and some hair samples that turned out to be a goat or something.
If you're into comedy, you will know what the show is about. We have so many comedy geeks, comedy enthusiasts, fanatical people who go to comedy festivals and follow comedians, and really treat it like rock 'n' roll - which it can be, but more like the geeky rock 'n' roll.
Open mind all the way. Because people have had eyewitness accounts, they've seen things, they swear they've seen things, and I tend to believe in people rather than - maybe I'm a little naive, but my optimistic outlook on life is to sort of be positive and take everyone at face value.
My optimistic outlook on life is to sort of be positive and take everyone at face value.
When there's characters out there that don't have humor, I don't find them as believable, because we all have humor, no matter what level it is, we all use it every day, no matter what situation we're in, we'll try and have a bit of a laugh even if it goes wrong.
I think some of the big characters, you know, they do these adventures, but they've got something about them, they've got this charisma, and they've got to have a sense of humor. Because whether it be very dry, or very silly, they've got to be likeable.
That's one of the best things about characters like Indiana Jones. I mean, he's funny. He's done really wicked things.
MacGyver of course, that's probably my favorite show of all time, because it was a guy who was so, so smart and could use his wits, and his technical know-how could get him out of any situation. There's something about the adventurer aspect of that show that I loved, that he went on all these great missions and saved people without having to use guns or anything like that. And I think that show might even be coming back, too.
['Dad's Army'] was a military thing but also very funny, so it's kind of the two things that I experienced by being a soldier, and I found it very humorous then and there, because of the juxtapositions [and] me and my emotional state.
I'd love to be [one of MacGyver's buddies]. I'd watch that one and just think, wow, what a life. Living in Hawaii, driving around in someone's Ferrari, and solving mysteries.
Greatest American Hero, I really dug that as a kid, because it had an alienation to it, where he was given a gift and didn't know why, and yet he was forced to do something with it and he was very much an out-of-place character who was trying to cope with his own surroundings, and I can kind of relate to that guy.

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