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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2016


Weekly Rushes. Scorsese's Next Film, Radiohead & P.T.A., "The Neon Demon" Trailer, Interviewing Woody Allen & Frederick Wiseman

11 May 2016 2:43 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.NEWSLiam Neeson in Martin Scorsese's SilenceWe're still waiting for Martin Scorsese's new film set in 17th century Japan, Silence (an adaptation of the same book Masahiro Shinoda's 1971 film is based on), but things may be moving quickly for his next project, the long-in-gestation The Irishman, set to star Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci. We'll believe it when we see it, but we sure want to see it!Cannes begins! If this week's Rushes seems a bit threadbare, it's because we've arrive at the Cannes Film Festival and can't think of anything else. Stay tuned on the Notebook for our festival coverage.Recommended VIEWINGOur very favorite video essayist, Tag Gallagher, has made a new one for Sight & Sound on Raoul Walsh's classic noir western, »

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Daily | Film Comment, Brooklyn Rail

7 May 2016 10:46 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The new Film Comment is out with articles on Terence Davies, Alan Clarke, Lucile Hadzihalilovic and Juliet Berto in Jacques Rivette's Duelle, reviews of Athina Rachel Tsangari's Chevalier, Whit Stillman's Love & Friendship, Luca Guadagnino's A Bigger Splash, Hong Sang-soo's Right Now, Wrong Then and more. Also in today's roundup: David Bordwell on Orson Welles, Andrew Sarris's 1994 interview with Jean-Luc Godard, Jonathan Rosenbaum on Nicholas Ray and Alain Resnais, Ben Rivers on his influences, appreciations of the work of Georges Méliès, Terrence Malick and Stephen Chow—and much more. » - David Hudson »

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Criterion Reflections – 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) – Ld #60

3 May 2016 9:00 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

My quick take on 2001: A Space Odyssey is that, after carefully rewatching the film and reading a fair amount about it over this past week or so, I arrived at the conclusion that it’s my favorite movie of all that have ever been made. I have said the same thing in the past, but that was many years ago, long before I had become familiar with so many classics of world cinema and Hollywood’s past that preceded my birth. My deep immersion over the past decade into a self-directed study of film history led me to temporarily suspend judgment on so momentous a question as what I consider to be “the greatest film ever made,” but now I’m pretty comfortable with saying that it’s this one, without any doubt on my part. That’s subjectively speaking, »

- David Blakeslee

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Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street

25 April 2016 9:44 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The irrepressible Sam Fuller fashions a crime thriller for German TV with his expected eccentricity: old-fashioned hardboiled scripting, freeform direction and bits of graffiti from the French New Wave. Christa Lang is the femme fatale and Glenn Corbett is the twofisted American hero, whose name is Not Griff. And yes, a pigeon does bite the pavement on Beethoven Street, and I tell you, that's one dead pigeon. Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street Blu-ray Olive Films 1974 / Color / 1:33 flat full frame (for German TV / 127 min. / Tote Taube in der Beethovenstraße / Street Date April 19, 2016 / / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95 Starring Glenn Corbett, Christa Lang, Sieghardt Rupp, Anton Diffring, Stéphane Audran, Alexander D'Arcy, Anthony Chinn. Cinematography Jerzy Lipman Film Editor Liesgret Schmitt-Klink Original Music The Can German dialogue by Manfred R. Köhler Produced by Joachim von Mengershausen Written and Directed by Samuel Fuller

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Not that it helped Sam Fuller's career much, »

- Glenn Erickson

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Secret Movies: Theodore Roszak’S Flicker

2 April 2016 9:30 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

[caption id="attachment_24623" align="aligncenter" width="575"] Edgar G. Ulmer[/caption]

Seeing Edgar G. Ulmer’s The Black Cat (1934) again recently, my appetite was whetted to re-read Theodore Roszak’s Flicker, which uses Ulmer’s strange career as a master stylist exiled to a career toiling in B-movie obscurity as a jumping-off point for a sinister story engorged with a decadent and whispered history of movies. Three years ago I was commissioned to write about Flicker for writer Bill Ryan’s annual October consideration of horror at his great blog The Kind of Face You Hate. I had to admit, I never really thought of Flicker as a horror novel in the strictest sense while I was immersed in it-- the first half reads more like an indulgent orgy of movie lore woven expertly into a pleasingly reluctant, expertly teased detective story. But the book certainly qualifies as horror in that it shares the obsessive nature of its protagonist, »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Symmetry of ‘Amélie,’ Visconti’s Ambiguity, Analyzing ‘Black Rainbow,’ Making of ‘Krisha,’ and More

21 March 2016 2:42 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

The software used by Studio Ghibli will be free and open source starting on March 26th, Wired reports.

Explore the symmetry and camera movement in Amélie:

RogerEbert.com‘s Steve Erickson on the current state of foreign-language film distribution:

There’s no end to the essays by baby-boomers recalling the golden age of art cinema from the ‘50s to the ‘70s, many of them proclaiming the death of the movies in the present day. I was born in 1972, so I missed out on personally experiencing this arthouse heyday; my earliest exposure to world cinema came in the late ‘80s, when its Us distribution was at an unprecedented nadir. »

- TFS Staff

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Wolves of Wall Street: 'Billions,' 'The Big Short,' and the New Gilded Age

14 January 2016 11:00 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

In the fourth episode of Showtime's new series, "Billions," hedge fund manager Bobby "Axe" Axelrod (Damian Lewis) is compared to kings, nation-states, and God Himself, but none strikes so disheartening a note as the one to Charles Foster Kane. Orson Welles' tragic hero, first introduced to Axelrod by a flirtatious songstress in Québec City, of all places, soon becomes something of an abortive obsession for the darkly charismatic capitalist. Though he arranges for a 35mm print to be projected in his private screening room, "Rosebud" remains out of reach, the film subject to constant intrusions by the Wall Street squawk box of shorts, squeezes, and the SEC. Axelrod is, in this sense, not unlike "Billions" itself: drawn to the symbols of the denatured American Dream—as potent today as they were upon the release of "Citizen Kane" in 1941—but unwilling, or unable, to see the attraction through. Though Andrew Sarris. »

- Matt Brennan

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Wolves of Wall Street: 'Billions,' 'The Big Short,' and the New Gilded Age

14 January 2016 11:00 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

In the fourth episode of Showtime's new series, "Billions," hedge fund manager Bobby "Axe" Axelrod (Damian Lewis) is compared to kings, nation-states, and God Himself, but none strikes so disheartening a note as the one to Charles Foster Kane. Orson Welles' tragic hero, first introduced to Axelrod by a flirtatious songstress in Québec City, of all places, soon becomes something of an abortive obsession for the darkly charismatic capitalist. Though he arranges for a 35mm print to be projected in his private screening room, "Rosebud" remains out of reach, the film subject to constant intrusions by the Wall Street squawk box of shorts, squeezes, and the SEC. Axelrod is, in this sense, not unlike "Billions" itself: drawn to the symbols of the denatured American Dream—as potent today as they were upon the release of "Citizen Kane" in 1941—but unwilling, or unable, to see the attraction through. Though Andrew Sarris. »

- Matt Brennan

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2016


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