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Stranger Things 2: complete Easter Egg and reference guide

Michael Ahr Oct 30, 2017

Stranger Things season 2 is filled with pop culture references and other goodies you may have missed. Here's what our Us chums found...

Warning: contains episode-by-episode spoilers.

See related Legends Of Tomorrow season 3 episode 3 review: Zari Legends Of Tomorrow season 3 episode 2 review: Freakshow Legends Of Tomorrow season 3 episode 1 review: Aruba-con

With a series like Stranger Things, which places a lot of weight behind its nostalgia for 80s pop culture, any hidden references, allusions, and homages become key for audience enjoyment, especially for those who were the same age back then as the kids are in the show. Whether it be a song choice with particularly appropriate lyrics, a recognisable image meant to invoke an 80s movie or TV show, or a detail harkening back to season 1, we’ve compiled a comprehensive list of all the easter eggs and references here.

Did we miss any? Let us know
See full article at Den of Geek »

A Gentle Giant in Captivity - An Interview with Derek Schulman

Recently, Dusty provided me a golden opportunity: in connection with the release of Three-Piece Suite -- a remastering of some compositions from Gentle Giant's first three albums -- their media team offered an interview with Derek Schulman, lead singer for the group, and now a high-level record company executive. Knowing my love of Gentle Giant, Dusty offered the interview to me. There was no constraint on content, only on the number of questions (an even dozen). So, with thanks to Anne Leighton (of Anne Leighton Media), who coordinated, here is my interview with one of progressive rock's most iconic figures, both as an artist and as a rep:

1. There has been a sort of minor resurgence of things Gentle Giant, including the induction of the band into the Portsmouth Hall of Fame, and the imminent release of Three-Piece Suite, a collection of compositions from the first three Gentle Giant albums,
See full article at CultureCatch »

Paul Thomas Anderson and Haim’s ‘Valentine’ Short Film is 14 Minutes of 35mm Heaven — Watch

Paul Thomas Anderson and Haim’s ‘Valentine’ Short Film is 14 Minutes of 35mm Heaven — Watch
Paul Thomas Anderson and Haim’s 35mm short “Valentine” toured select cinemas earlier this year in anticipation of the band’s second studio album, “Something to Tell You,” but now the 14-minute film has finally debuted online for all to stream. The clip is made up of three intimately shot music videos featuring Haim behind the scenes in the recording studio, with the first third of the video having already been released as the “Right Now” clip over the summer.

Read More:Paul Thomas Anderson’s New Short Film ‘Valentine’ Is an Exquisite Rock Opera

The short is named after Valentine Recording Studios in Los Angeles where Haim made the album, following in the footsteps of artists like The Beach Boys, Frank Zappa and Quincy Jones. As IndieWire’s review of the short explains, “The movie has a distinct documentary feel, capturing things like the sounds of Este Haim’s
See full article at Indiewire »

Jon Hamm Is a Great Actor, So Why Can’t He Find Another Great Role?

Jon Hamm Is a Great Actor, So Why Can’t He Find Another Great Role?
In his latest movie, “Marjorie Prime,” Jon Hamm plays a hologram who gives tender therapeutic advice to the aging lady he was once married to (it’s complicated), and if that doesn’t strike you as exciting, you’re not alone. The movie is a precious indie bauble that has already whiffed at the specialty box office. Hamm is crafty and spry in it; you might say — as some have — that it’s an adventurous role for him, in the same way that playing a violent sociopath with choppy shaved hair in “Baby Driver” was an adventurous role for him. These characters aren’t what we “expect” from Jon Hamm, so they make it look like he’s in there, trying on audacious things and working it. The question is: Why does Jon Hamm now look like he’s trying so hard?

I think what I’m asking is: Why isn’t Jon Hamm a movie star
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Critics Reveal the TV Character They First Identified With — IndieWire Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: When was the first time you saw a TV character that you felt represented you or your experience? Who was it? How did you feel? (This is jumping on the #FirstTimeISawMe hashtag about representation.)

Eric Deggans (@deggans), NPR

This is a tough question, because I don’t think I’ve seen a character like me yet on television (black comics nerd who loves playing drums, has a thirst for pop culture, spent his teens grooving to Frank Zappa and Parliament/Funkadelic and has a passion for racial issues and opposing stereotypes in media. Nope, haven’t seen that character yet). But the first time I saw
See full article at Indiewire »

Critics Reveal the TV Character They First Identified With — IndieWire Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: When was the first time you saw a TV character that you felt represented you or your experience? Who was it? How did you feel? (This is jumping on the #FirstTimeISawMe hashtag about representation.)

Eric Deggans (@deggans), NPR

This is a tough question, because I don’t think I’ve seen a character like me yet on television (black comics nerd who loves playing drums, has a thirst for pop culture, spent his teens grooving to Frank Zappa and Parliament/Funkadelic and has a passion for racial issues and opposing stereotypes in media. Nope, haven’t seen that character yet). But the first time I saw
See full article at Indiewire Television »

5 Album Covers That Ripped Off ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ (Photos)

5 Album Covers That Ripped Off ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ (Photos)
The Beatles’ iconic album, “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” was released 50 years ago today, and since its release, it has inspired a whole host of other artists – both musically and artistically. In celebration of Sgt. Pepper turning half-a-century old, here are five albums that derived inspiration from its cover. Rolling Stones: “Their Satanic Majesties Request” The Stones released “Their Satanic Majesties Request” to coincide with their experimentally psychedelic style. Although the album received a lot of flack from critics for its blatant copying of Sgt. Pepper, it saw warmer reception in later years. Frank Zappa/The Mothers of Invention: “We’re Only.
See full article at The Wrap »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Gabriel and the Mountain’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Gabriel and the Mountain’
Watching “Gabriel and the Mountain” is like getting to know all sides of a friend’s character: You may discover more arrogance than expected, but the elements you always liked are reinforced. That was presumably Fellipe Barbosa’s goal when making this follow-up to his much-acclaimed debut “Casa Grande,” based on school friend Gabriel Buchmann, who traveled to Africa and died on the slopes of Malawi’s Mount Mulanje in 2009. Though Gabriel came from the same milieu as the characters in Barbosa’s previous film, the two features are very different in feel; there’s some social critique, but mostly the director extends heartfelt warmth to his friend, with the help of men and women who met Gabriel on his journey. At a running time of more than two hours, the film’s length may give art-house programmers pause, but fests will have an audience pleaser.

Early descriptions have implied
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Norman Seeff Will Bring His Legendary Photoshoots to ‘The Sessions Project’

Norman Seeff Will Bring His Legendary Photoshoots to ‘The Sessions Project’
You’ve probably seen Norman Seeff’s work before. Maybe it’s Tina Turner in all of her energetic glory. Or perhaps Mick Jagger looking somewhat puckish. Over the years, he’s snapped Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, Jim Henson, Martin Scorsese, John Travolta, Frank Zappa Joni Mitchell, and many more.

Seeff isn’t just any celebrity photographer though, and there’s a reason why his images are vibrant and unique. He’s a filmmaker who documents the essence of a person in interactive photoshoots in which he also uses a film crew and conversation. The “sessions” themselves are the art, and the resulting photos are just an extension of the bigger project.

Read More: The 20 Highest Grossing Indies of 2017

Fortunately, these celebrated sessions that have captured so much of pop culture over the past four decades will be available on TV. Derik Murray and Network Entertainment, which also produced the
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Norman Seeff Will Bring His Legendary Photoshoots to ‘The Sessions Project’

Norman Seeff Will Bring His Legendary Photoshoots to ‘The Sessions Project’
You’ve probably seen Norman Seeff’s work before. Maybe it’s Tina Turner in all of her energetic glory. Or perhaps Mick Jagger looking somewhat puckish. Over the years, he’s snapped Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, Jim Henson, Martin Scorsese, John Travolta, Frank Zappa Joni Mitchell, and many more.

Seeff isn’t just any celebrity photographer though, and there’s a reason why his images are vibrant and unique. He’s a filmmaker who documents the essence of a person in interactive photoshoots in which he also uses a film crew and conversation. The “sessions” themselves are the art, and the resulting photos are just an extension of the bigger project.

Read More: The 20 Highest Grossing Indies of 2017

Fortunately, these celebrated sessions that have captured so much of pop culture over the past four decades will be available on TV. Derik Murray and Network Entertainment, which also produced the
See full article at Indiewire »

Frank Zappa Family War, Dweezil vs. Ahmet and Diva

  • TMZ
Dweezil Zappa's brother and sister are going after him, claiming he's ruining the Zappa name by spreading lies that tarnish their father's legacy. Ahmet and Diva Zappa just filed legal docs asking a judge to let them start a website to counter Dweezil's claim they are trying to ruin his career by denying him the right to perform his Zappa Plays Zappa tour. Dweezil has gone on a rant claiming Ahmet and Diva
See full article at TMZ »

Mike Gold: Jay Lynch – Um Tut Sut!

Every town must have a place / Where phony hippies meet / Psychedelic dungeons / Popping up on every street • Frank Zappa, “Who Needs The Peace Corps?”

The late Sixties really did live up to its reputation. In my home town of Chicago hippie central was the Lincoln Park neighborhood around the iconic Biograph Theater, where, 34 years earlier, the FBI allegedly shot John Dillinger to death. Today, hippies can’t even afford to drive down Lincoln Avenue.

The area sported many blues and folk bars, giving such local talent as Steve Goodman, John Prine, Hound Dog Taylor and Harvey Mandel a place to strut their stuff. It was Mecca to the storefront theater movement, creating world-renown companies such as the Steppenwolf and the Organic Theater a home for newcomer writers and actors like David Mamet, Joe Mantegna, Laurie Metcalf, John Malkovich, and John Ostrander. A mile down the street was The Second City,
See full article at Comicmix »

Fred Weintraub, Producer of ‘Enter the Dragon,’ Dies at 88

Fred Weintraub, Producer of ‘Enter the Dragon,’ Dies at 88
Fred Weintraub, producer of Bruce Lee’s “Enter The Dragon,” died March 5 at his Pacific Palisades home due to natural causes related to Parkinson’s disease. He was 88.

Weintraub began his career in the entertainment business in the late 1950s when he started a jazz club in Cuba shortly before Fidel Castro came to power. In the early 1960s, he opened the Bitter End coffee house in Greenwich Village and booked such notables as Bob Dylan, Richard Pryor, Neil Diamond, Woody Allen, Frank Zappa, Lily Tomlin, Stevie Wonder, Joni Mitchell, George Carlin, Barbara Streisand, Joan Rivers, and Cheech and Chong.

The goateed and pony-tailed Weintraub hosted a live weekly television show, “Live At The Bitter End,” with his St. Bernard dog at his feet.

Weintraub became the VP of Creative Services at Warner Bros. in the late 1960s and served on the studio’s board of directors. He was involved
See full article at Variety - Film News »

How Lost Leonard Cohen Doc 'Bird on a Wire' Finally Made It to Theaters

How Lost Leonard Cohen Doc 'Bird on a Wire' Finally Made It to Theaters
Leonard Cohen's career was on the verge of complete disaster in late 1971. Songs of Love and Hate, his most recent record, peaked at #145 on the American charts – this despite containing future classics like "Famous Blue Raincoat" and "Joan of Arc." CBS was ready to cut their losses and drop him from the label. A tour would give him the chance to regain some momentum, though Cohen hated performing live; he only reluctantly agreed to a one-month run in Europe because Songs of Love and Hate found a much bigger
See full article at Rolling Stone »

My Year In Vinyl, 2016

Happy New Year! It's been a tumultuous year for me and for many of us of a certain age. I lost a brother. The world lost a slew of pop culture -- Carrie Fisher, Alan Richman, Craig Sager, John Glenn -- and music icons -- Bowie, Prince, Leonard Cohen, George Michael, et al. One comfort for me was music and my rediscovery of vinyl. The warm, comforting sound of analog became my daily meditative fix. Quite literarily. Seeking out vinyl "nuggets" became a quest to help me deal with my own pain and depression. Chasing down albums that I owned thirty years, abadonded at the advent of those shiny new things called compact discs. Restorative analog power reigned o'er me. One of my chief caveats: I would not purchase anything on vinyl that I already owned on compact disc. Well, that rule didn't last long as I found comfort in
See full article at CultureCatch »

12 Days of Christmas Horror: Day 7 – Elves (1989)

Elves, 1989.

Directed by Jeffrey Mandel.

Starring Dan Haggerty, Deanna Lund, Julie Austin and Borah Silver.

Synopsis:

In a botched attempt to perform an occult ritual, a group of friends accidently summon up a demonic elf. The elf soon attempts to seek out one of the girls, the virginal Kirsten, in an effort to complete a decades-old secret plan conjured up by incestuous Nazis to create a master race of human/elf hybrids who would take over the world, and only a former cop turned department store Santa can stop them.

We all know Santa Claus and his jolly gift-giving ways and love the way he breaks into people’s house and empties his sack all over their living rooms, the dirty bastard. But away from my childish innuendos, Santa would be nothing without the help of his elves, those poor short souls who have to work all year and make toys for children,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Doc Corner: 'Mavis!' and 'We Are X' Spotlight the Music

Every year there are so many documentaries about musicians that it sometimes feels as if we will surely run out. We of course all know that will never be the case, and in this landscape of film distribution, documentaries like these are the easiest sells so it’s hard to blame the makers. In 2016 alone we’ve see films about The Beatles, Nick Cave, Oasis, Frank Zappa, and the late Sharon Jones. Jim Jarmusch has released Gimme Danger about Iggy Pop and The Stooges and there has even been yet another Rolling Stones doc called The Rolling Stones Ole Ole Ole!: A Trip Across Latin America that I never knew existed.

This week we’re looking at two more that are on this year’s Oscar eligibility long-list and which focus on polar-opposite worlds of music: rhythm and blues icon Mavis Staple and Japanese hard-rock phenomenon X.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Vinyl of the Week: Frank Zappa - Hot Rats!

With vinyl being a hot music commodity and back in vogue, it would seem inevitable that one of the music giants of the vinyl era would get remastered and re-released. Frank Zappa remains one of the those musical geniuses where his impact was missed by a deservedly larger fanbase while he roamed planet Earth. With a must-see documentary -- Eat That Question: Frank Zappa In His Own Words (Sony Pictures Classic) -- currently in theaters and on demand, hopefully some of his genius will be discovered by a new generation of fans. Certainly the above-titled masterpiece Hot Rats, reissued by Zappa Records in August on 180gram vinyl cut directly from the original analog master tapes by Bernie Grundman, remains one of his cornerstone releases in his immense and musically varied catalog. 

Which brings us to the album itself... an album that I've purchased a few years after its initial vinyl
See full article at CultureCatch »

Eat That Question: Frank Zappa in His Own Words review – portrait of a musical revolutionary

The rock star and provocateur is imperturbably articulate and droll in this entertaining documentary made of archive footage and interview clips

This excellent documentary doesn’t spell it out, but Frank Zappa was actually Frank Zappa’s real name (unlike, say, Ziggy Stardust) and everything about him was authentic, presented to the public on a take-it-or-leave-it basis. If anyone deserves an approving sobriquet with the “American” prefix – American Original, American Genius, American Rebel – it was Zappa, the rock’n’roll musician, freak-provocateur and contemporary composer and orchestral arranger influenced by Anton Webern, Edgard Varèse and Igor Stravinsky. This film allows him to speak “in his own words”, which means clips from his imperturbably droll, articulate performances in TV interviews over the years during which he morphed from sensually hirsute rock god to bearded patriarch, without selling out or putting on weight.

In a perfect world, “Zappa in his own words
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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