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1-20 of 49 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


Nine Best James Bond Films

2 December 2012 7:35 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Concluding a very successful James bond marathon, comes our list of the very best 007 films, as chosen by the Sound On Sight staff. In just 30 days, we managed to publish over 40 articles and reviews, making it our most successful monthly movie club to date. I’d like to once again thank everyone who participated and furthermore, thank everyone who voted for having good taste. I cannot argue with the final results. These are indeed the best Bond films. Enjoy!

#1: From Russia With Love

Directed by Terence Young

Written by Richard Maibaum and Johanna Harwood

1963, UK

50 years later, and with twenty three “official” entries, From Russia With Love represents the very best of the Bond franchise. Skyfall is the closest to be considered, at best – almost equal to what was achieved in ’64 – but From Russia With Love is still unparalleled. Although it is the second in the series, and although »

- Ricky

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‘From Russia With Love’ remains sans pareil

28 November 2012 8:27 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

From Russia With Love

Directed by Terrence Stamp

Written by Richard Maibaum and Johanna Harwood

1963, UK

50 years later, and with twenty three “official” entries, From Russia With Love represents the very best of the Bond franchise. Skyfall is the closest to be considered, at best – almost equal to what was achieved in ’64 – but From Russia With Love is still unparalleled. Although it is the second in the series, and although it feels like no Bond film that followed, it is the film that solidifies all the Bond elements into a formula – a template that carries on, even today.

Spectre’s Persian-stroking nemesis/mastermind Ernest Blofeld makes his first appearance (even if he’s not referred to by that name), and so does Desmond Llewelyn’s gadget-friendly Q (starting a run that continued until his death in 1999). Screenwriters Richard Maibaum and Johanna Harwood return as does director and editor Terence Young and Peter Hunt. »

- Ricky

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Skyfall sequel storyline already formulated by Sam Mendes

21 November 2012 6:25 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Oscar-winning director may return for next Bond film, say outgoing writers Robert Wade and Neal Purvis

Sam Mendes has come up with a storyline for a sequel to Skyfall, his current blockbuster James Bond movie, according to the outgoing writers of the past five 007 films.

Speaking during an appearance at the fourth Doha Tribeca film festival in Qatar, Robert Wade and Neal Purvis said they felt as though they were leaving the long-running spy saga in good shape after working on the series since 1999's The World Is Not Enough. John Logan, who worked with the pair on Skyfall, is in line to take on screenwriting duties for the next two 007 films.

Wade said: "We're very happy to have done five Bond movies, I think we've gotten it to a good place. I know that John Logan and Sam Mendes have come up with a plot for another one, which »

- Ben Child

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Every James Bond Movie Statistic You Never Knew You Needed to Know (Part 2)

9 November 2012 3:05 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

    If you're like us, there's no point in watching movies unless you're going to obsessively keep track of how often certain things happen in them. What use is entertainment without math, right?? So to celebrate the release of the new James Bond film, we watched all 23 officially sanctioned adventures -- including Skyfall -- and compiled many relevant statistics to improve your quality of life.   This list is a movie-by-movie breakdown. If you want to see the stats we pulled for the entire series, check that out here.   Dr. No (1962, 109 minutes) Director: Terence Young     Bond's personal kills: 3   Total body count: 8   "Bond. James Bond.": 1   Double-oh-sex: Once...

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- Eric D. Snider

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Best James Bond Scenes: Sean Connery Era

9 November 2012 2:54 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The most commercially successful Bond film to date is Thunderball. The pic earned over $141 million worldwide, of which more than half was generated domestically in the U.S. The film was such a success, it was remade some 18 years later as Never Say Never Again. This is without a doubt my favourite Bond film (although not the best), and the film that perfected the ‘Bond Formula”. Every key player is back: lead actor Sen Connery, director Terence Young, longtime Bond screenwriter Richard Maibaum, cinematographer Ted Moore, title sequence designer Maurice Binder, and composer John Barry.

11: Thunderball - Opening Title Sequence

Maurice Binder returns to the fold after two films away, and creates the quintessential Bond title sequence. The titles of Thunderball are visually striking, showing silhouettes of naked women swimming around against coloured backgrounds. Binder hired two dancers who actually swam about in tanks in disco clubs and convinced »

- Ricky

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James Bond Exclusive: Director/Editor Peter Hunt On the Film Origins of 007, Part 1

9 November 2012 6:05 AM, PST | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

Interview conducted by and copyright Edward Gross He first joined up with Albert R. Broccoli, Harry Saltzman, Terence Young and the rest of the 007 team for 1962's Dr. No, on which he served as editor. He repeated this task on From Russia With Love, Goldfinger, Thunderball and You Only Live Twice. From there he segued to the position of director on the sixth film in the series, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, considered by many to be one of the best Bond films ever despite the fact it marked the first time Sean Connery didn't play 007. Unfortunately, after that film Hunt (who passed away in 2002) left the folds of Bondage, turning his directorial sights to other films. Our conversation begins with the director's assertion that the impact of James Bond was every bit as significant to the sixties as the Beatles. Media Geek: My feeling has always been that what »

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Skyfall – The Review

8 November 2012 9:57 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

What’s the one word that really brings a smile to the face of a movie studio executive? Well aside from “profit” that word would probably be “franchise”. That’s a film property that spawns countless sequels and lucrative merchandising. Well Skyfall celebrates 50 years of the greatest. longest-running film franchise of them all (we’ll see if Harry Potter or “Star Wars” can go five decades): James Bond 007. 1962 saw the release of the first ‘Cubby Broccoli/Harry Saltzman produced feature adaptation based on Ian Fleming’s popular novel ( there was a live Us TV version of “Casino Royale” with Barry Nelson as “Jimmy” Bond broadcast in 1954): Dr. No. The series quickly become the main jewel in studio United Artists’ crown. As several pop-culture scholars have stated, the 60′s were the three B’s: Beatles, Batman, and Bond. While the lads from Liverpool broke up by the end of »

- Jim Batts

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50 Years of Bond: ‘Dr. No’ – Arguably sexist and racist, but no doubt, terrific entertainment

1 November 2012 11:39 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Dr. No

Directed by Terence Young

Written by Richard Maibaum & Johanna Harwood

1962, UK

Author Ian Fleming had been seeking out a movie deal for nearly a decade until the rights for his novels were finally bought by producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli. Little did they know they would change the landscape of spy-action cinema forever with the release of Dr. No.

Dr. No was the first James Bond novel turned into a film, though it was the sixth novel in the book series The film was adapted by Wolf Mankowitz (who went uncredited by request, fearing the film would bomb), Johanna Harwood (the first and only women screenwriter of the franchise), Berkeley Mather, and long time contributor Richard Maibaum. Arguably Dr. No is one of the closest cinematic interpretations of any Bond novel in tone and plot. The changes they made were mostly cosmetic save for some minor »

- Ricky

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100 + Greatest Horror Movies (pt.4) 75-51

25 October 2012 6:15 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the month of October, Editor-in-Chief and resident Horror expert Ricky D, will be posting a list of his favorite Horror films of all time. The list will be posted in six parts. Click here to see every entry.

As with all lists, this is personal and nobody will agree with every choice – and if you do, that would be incredibly disturbing. It was almost impossible for me to rank them in order, but I tried and eventually gave up.

****

Special Mention:

American Psycho

Directed by Mary Harrron

Written by Mary Harron

2000, USA

Bret Easton Ellis’s dark and violent satire of America in the 1980s was brought to the big screen by director Mary Harron. Initially slapped with the MPAA’s kiss of death (an Nc-17 rating), American Psycho was later re-edited and reduced to a more commercially dependable “R”. Perhaps the film works best as a slick satire about misogyny, »

- Ricky

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Thn’s Bond Movie Titles Rundown Part 1

22 October 2012 2:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

When the 23rd Bond movie was christened Skyfall, fans the world over were arching their collective eyebrow and saying, ‘Sherioushly? Shkyfall?’

It’s fair to say that it doesn’t have that Bondian ring to it. In fact it sounds more like a James Bond computer game. With titles like Agent Under Fire, Nightfire and Everything Or Nothing, they all sounded vaguely 007-esque, but by no means good enough to warrant a cinematic eponym. Skyfall fits in more with that mob than with its theatrical brethren, but just how good are the previous film names? Some are clearly great (Goldfinger), some are fun but tenuous (Live And Let Die) and some are straight up nonsensical  (A View To A Kill… That… I… I don’t know what that means).

In this series, we shan’t be discussing the films as such, but the titles specifically and how they relate to »

- John Sharp

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Sam Mendes happy to direct another Bond

19 October 2012 7:10 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

British director says Skyfall has left him 'knackered' but that he would do it again if it is goes down well with audiences

Sam Mendes has said he would happily direct another James Bond film if Skyfall proves to be a hit with audiences.

Speaking to Time Out, the Oscar-winning British director of American Beauty said he had been left "knackered" by the process of putting together the 23rd "official" Bond movie, but was not ruling out a return.

"I've enjoyed it enough to do it again," said Mendes. "I think the choice is in the audience's hands. If people love the movie and they want to see another one from the same people who brought you Skyfall, then that would mean a lot to me. I would feel like, 'Well, actually there are people who really want to see it.'

"But I feel like I've put everything I »

- Ben Child

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James Bond At 50

5 October 2012 11:42 PM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

James Bond celebrated its 50th anniversary on the Big Screen yesterday, half a century after the release of the seminal “Dr No”.

Based on the 1958 Ian Fleming novel of the same name – Dr No starred Sean Connery and was directed by Terence Young. Since then, it has been followed by 22 Bond Films, whilst a 23rd in the series, entitled Skyfall, is due to be released later this month.

Sean Connery was the first to play the role of the sleuth, and was followed by David Niven, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan and more latterly Daniel Craig. Whilst the films have gone from one success to the other, with its guns, cars and babes being deeply embedded in popular culture, Flemings literary works, which spawned the franchise, were much less well received.

The fourteen novels he penned from 1953 were, according to his niece Kate Grimmond “despised”. Speaking to »

- Joseph Dempsey

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The Daughters of James Bond: Barbara Broccoli and Hilary Saltzman on Their Producer Fathers, Their Films and 50 Years of 007

5 October 2012 7:34 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

October 5th, 2012 has been declared Global James Bond Day in honor of the 50th anniversary of the release of "Dr. No," the first film adaptation of Ian Fleming's series of novels about the legendary superspy. Directed by Terence Young and starring Sean Connery as the premiere Bond, the film was produced by the team of Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, who would shepherd Bond through global adventures and changes in lead actor. Epix is marking the occasion of a half-century of Bond with the exclusive documentary "Everything Or Nothing: The Untold Story of 007," airing tonight, October 5th, at 8pm and several more times over the coming weeks. Directed by Stevan Riley ("Fire in Babylon"), the film looks at how Broccoli, Saltzman and Fleming made Bond into the generation-spanning icon he is today. Indiewire had the chance to speak with Barbara Broccoli (who, with half-brother Michael G. Wilson, »

- Danny Bowes

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The Daughters of James Bond: Barbara Broccoli and Hilary Saltzman on Their Producer Fathers, Their Films and 50 Years of 007

5 October 2012 7:34 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

October 5th, 2012 has been declared Global James Bond Day in honor of the 50th anniversary of the release of "Dr. No," the first film adaptation of Ian Fleming's series of novels about the legendary superspy. Directed by Terence Young and starring Sean Connery as the premiere Bond, the film was produced by the team of Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, who would shepherd Bond through global adventures and changes in lead actor. Epix is marking the occasion of a half-century of Bond with the exclusive documentary "Everything Or Nothing: The Untold Story of 007," airing tonight, October 5th, at 8pm and several more times over the coming weeks. Directed by Stevan Riley ("Fire in Babylon"), the film looks at how Broccoli, Saltzman and Fleming made Bond into the generation-spanning icon he is today. Indiewire had the chance to speak with Barbara Broccoli (who, with half-brother Michael G. Wilson, »

- Danny Bowes

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25 Things You Didn't Know About 'Dr. No,' The First James Bond Movie

4 October 2012 10:05 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

The opening shot, viewed from inside the barrel of a gun. The silhouetted beauties of Maurice Binder's credit sequence. That Monty Norman instrumental theme, promising sex and danger in just four notes. The martinis. The game of chance that's really a game of nerves. The women, gorgeous and lethal. The patient Miss Moneypenny, who'd give as good as she gets if he ever gave her a chance. The supervillain, living in a luxurious, elaborate hidden lair. And the line of introduction: "Bond, James Bond." It's remarkable how many enduring elements of the James Bond film franchise were there from day one, built into the initial installment, "Dr. No," (released 50 years ago, on October 5, 1962). That's why, even if you've never seen "Dr. No," you feel like you know it. Even so, there's plenty you may not know about the landmark spy film, including the real-life spies who made it, how »

- Gary Susman

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Countdown to Skyfall - Dr. No (1962)

3 October 2012 8:49 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Flickering Myth's writing team count down to the release of Skyfall by discussing their favourite James Bond films; first up is Peter Gigg with 007's first official screen adventure Dr. No...

At Le Cercle casino, a sickly fug of tobacco fills the air. The hall is cavernous, strewn with gilt furniture and crystal chandeliers. Attention is gathered around the blackjack table, where the participants play in a tense silence, the stakes rising into the thousands. Although the gamblers share nervous glances, one has his back to us, piquing the interest of the beautiful Sylvia Trench. With an eyebrow cocked, she finally addresses the mystery figure;

“I admire your luck, Mr...?”

And with the snap of a dunhill lighter and the stirring of a guitar riff comes the most iconic line in cinematic history;

“Bond … James Bond.”

Watching Dr. No again, it struck me how impossible it is to conceive of cinema without James Bond. »

- flickeringmyth

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Preview Adele's James Bond Theme Skyfall

1 October 2012 2:30 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

You are going to be hearing the name "James Bond" a lot this week. A lot a lot. On October 5, 1962 the first ever screening of Terence Young's Dr. No was held in London marking the first theatrical showing of a Bond movie. Naturally that night ended up having a major impact on film history, and we've (off-and-on) enjoyed the 21 movies that have been released since, and this year - the 50th anniversary - will see the release of the 23rd: Skyfall. We've already gotten a number of previews for the Sam Mendes-directed film, such as trailers and behind the scenes video blogs (such as this one released last night about filming underwater), but this new preview is very special. It's our first listen to the new theme song performed by renowned songstress Adele. With her performance of the song "Skyfall," the singer/songwriter joins the ranks of people »

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My favourite Bond film: From Russia With Love

25 September 2012 4:56 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Sean Connery's 1963 outing to Istanbul may look grainy now, but his exchanges with Robert Shaw have lost none of their edge

From Russia With Love is my favourite James Bond movie, simply because it is the first Bond I ever saw at the cinema. This was at the old Classic in Hendon Central in London, some time in the early 1970s, in an era before Bond films were shown on television, and going to see them at the cinema was a special school-holiday treat. Quite long-in-the-tooth Bond films would be revived on the big screen like this: this was a double bill of From Russia With Love (1963) and Thunderball (1965).

What a thrill to hear that incredible theme tune played live (as it were) for the first time, echoing around the cavernous old cinema and seeing those opening titles: the mysterious circle shunting across the dark screen, Bond walking in profile, »

- Peter Bradshaw

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My favourite Bond film: Dr No

25 September 2012 4:54 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

In the second of our Favourite Bond series, Philip French falls for the unselfconscious charm of Dr No: a modest thriller with Sean Connery as the tough, stylish hero

Someone once said that the best Raymond Chandler novel is the first one you read, because between the debut of Philip Marlowe in The Big Sleep (1939) and his last significant appearance in The Long Good-bye (1953), the books are pretty even in quality and there's nothing quite like the initial impact of Chandler's style, Marlowe's company and their colourful southern California locale. The same is not true of his devoted follower, Ian Fleming, whose first half-dozen James Bond novels are far superior to those that followed – being more realistic, better plotted and altogether less fantastical. Casino Royale is arguably his best book, and when eventually it was filmed with Daniel Craig in 2006 (there had been a sad, jokey, non-canonical version in 1967), it »

- Philip French

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The Valachi Papers – A Look back at 1972

10 September 2012 8:16 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The St. Louis Globe-Democrat is a monthly newspaper run by Steve DeBellis, a well know St. Louis historian, and it.s the largest one-man newspaper in the world. The concept of The Globe is that there is an old historic headline, then all the articles in that issue are written as though it.s the year that the headline is from. It.s an unusual concept but the paper is now in its 25th successful year! Steve and I collaborated last year on an all-Vincent Price issue of The Globe and I.ve been writing a regular movie-related column since. Since there is no on-line version of The Globe, I  post all of my articles here at We Are Movie Geeks as well. In honor of the 40th anniversary of Blueberry Hill, the landmark St. Louis restaurant and music club that.s filled with pop culture memorabilia, this month.s St. »

- Tom Stockman

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