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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004

12 items from 2014


Reeve Receives Standing Ovation at Oscar Ceremony (Video)

10 October 2014 6:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Christopher Reeve Foundation for spinal cord and stem cell research (photo: Darryl Hannah and Christopher Reeve in 'Rear Window') (See previous post: "'Superman' Christopher Reeve and his Movies: Ten-Year Death Anniversary.") In his 1998 autobiography Still Me, Christopher Reeve recalled: "At an especially bleak moment [prior to an operation that might result in his death], the door [of his hospital room] flew open and in hurried a squat fellow with a blue scrub hat and a yellow surgical gown and glasses, speaking in a Russian accent. For the first time since the accident, I laughed. My old friend had helped me know that somehow I was going to be okay." The "old friend" was the recently deceased Robin Williams, whom Reeve had befriended while both were studying at Juillard. Eventually, Reeve became a staunch advocate for spinal cord and stem cell research, sponsoring with his wife the Christopher Reeve Foundation — later renamed the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation (and formerly known »

- Andre Soares

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Review: "The Shout" (1978) Starring Alan Bates, Susannah York And John Hurt, UK Blu-ray Release

3 October 2014 3:23 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

(This review pertains to the British Blu-ray release by Network)

By Adrian Smith 

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A mysterious Englishman with mystical powers, a sexy wife, a game of cricket and an insane asylum. In different hands these elements could have been combined to make an Amicus portmanteau film in the style of Tales From the Crypt or Asylum. In the hands of I, Claudius author Robert Graves and Palme d'Or-winning Polish director Jerzy Skolimowski it becomes a strange, hypnotic and fragmented tale that unsettles and confuses in equal measure.

Alan Bates, who could give Richard Burton a run for his money in the "brooding intensity" stakes, plays Crossley, a disheveled yet charismatic wanderer who bursts uninvited into the lives of Anthony and Rachel with devastating consequences. Anthony (John Hurt) is a Radiophonic Workshop-style musician who spends most of his time recording unusual noises and manipulating tape decks. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Pride | Review

24 September 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

The Climate Was Changing: Warchus Revisits 80s Set Instance of Activism

British director Matthew Warchus first appeared in 1999 with his directorial debut, Simpatico, based on the Sam Shepard play. While it received a rather underwhelming response despite starring Jeff Bridges, Nick Nolte and a supporting Sharon Stone, Warchus has been off the map for the past fifteen years until Pride. An insightful screenplay from first time writer Stephen Beresford is the first of many surprises in this well performed resuscitation of the 1984 UK mining strike, which examines the possibilities of tolerance and supporting those in need of assistance. Though its tale may seem merely a footnote in the long haul toward Lgbt equality, Warchus has concocted a relatable film meant to cross boundaries and audiences, and thankfully isn’t shackled down by its own good intentions.

In 1984 Britain, the National Union of Mineworkers called a series of strikes that crippled the government. »

- Nicholas Bell

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Gardner, Crawford Among Academy's Career Achievement Award Non-Winners

4 September 2014 3:08 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Honorary Award: Gloria Swanson, Rita Hayworth among dozens of women bypassed by the Academy (photo: Honorary Award non-winner Gloria Swanson in 'Sunset Blvd.') (See previous post: "Honorary Oscars: Doris Day, Danielle Darrieux Snubbed.") Part three of this four-part article about the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Honorary Award bypassing women basically consists of a long, long — and for the most part quite prestigious — list of deceased women who, some way or other, left their mark on the film world. Some of the names found below are still well known; others were huge in their day, but are now all but forgotten. Yet, just because most people (and the media) suffer from long-term — and even medium-term — memory loss, that doesn't mean these women were any less deserving of an Honorary Oscar. So, among the distinguished female film professionals in Hollywood and elsewhere who have passed away without »

- Andre Soares

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Daily | Brian G. Hutton, 1935 – 2014

21 August 2014 7:47 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

"Brian G. Hutton, who directed Clint Eastwood in the World War II classics Where Eagles Dare and Kelly's Heroes as well as Frank Sinatra in the dark cop drama The First Deadly Sin, has died. He was believed to be 79." Mike Barnes for the Hollywood Reporter: "Hutton also called the shots on two films toplined by Elizabeth Taylor: the drama X, Y and Zee (1972), also starring Michael Caine and Susannah York, and Night Watch (1973), with Taylor, as a widow suffering from a nervous breakdown, playing opposite Laurence Harvey." We've also made note of remembrances from Variety and Cinema Retro. » - David Hudson »

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Brian G. Hutton, Director of ‘Where Eagles Dare,’ ‘Kelly’s Heroes,’ Dies at 79

20 August 2014 1:16 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Brian G. Hutton, who directed Clint Eastwood in the WWII actioners “Where Eagles Dare” (1968) and “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970) and also directed Elizabeth Taylor in two films, has died. He was 79.

Where Eagles Dare,” a thriller based on the Alistair MacLean novel, also starred Richard Burton, while “Kelly Heroes,” a heist film masquerading as a war film, sported a large ensemble cast that included Telly Savalas, Don Rickles, Carroll O’Connor and Donald Sutherland.

Hutton’s 1972 drama “X, Y and Zee” starred Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Caine and Susannah York concerned an an architect, his mistress, and the wife intent on breaking them at all costs. Follow-up film “Night Watch,” starring Taylor and Laurence Harvey, was a thriller.

Hutton did not direct again until 1980’s Lawrence Sanders adaptation “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra as a New York police detective and Faye Dunaway his dying wife.

His final directorial effort was »

- Carmel Dagan

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Brian G. Hutton, Director of ‘Where Eagles Dare,’ ‘Kelly’s Heroes,’ Dies at 79

20 August 2014 1:16 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Brian G. Hutton, who directed Clint Eastwood in the WWII actioners “Where Eagles Dare” (1968) and “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970) and also directed Elizabeth Taylor in two films, has died. He was 79.

Where Eagles Dare,” a thriller based on the Alistair MacLean novel, also starred Richard Burton, while “Kelly Heroes,” a heist film masquerading as a war film, sported a large ensemble cast that included Telly Savalas, Don Rickles, Carroll O’Connor and Donald Sutherland.

Hutton’s 1972 drama “X, Y and Zee” starred Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Caine and Susannah York concerned an an architect, his mistress, and the wife intent on breaking them at all costs. Follow-up film “Night Watch,” starring Taylor and Laurence Harvey, was a thriller.

Hutton did not direct again until 1980’s Lawrence Sanders adaptation “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra as a New York police detective and Faye Dunaway his dying wife.

His final directorial effort was »

- Carmel Dagan

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Brian G. Hutton, Director of 'Kelly's Heroes' and 'Where Eagles Dare,' Dies at 79

20 August 2014 12:50 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Brian G. Hutton, who directed Clint Eastwood in the World War II classics Where Eagles Dare and Kelly's Heroes as well as Frank Sinatra in the dark cop drama The First Deadly Sin, has died. He was believed to be 79. Hutton, who started his career as an actor, died Tuesday in Los Angeles after suffering a heart attack a week ago, his longtime friend, producer Al Ruddy, told The Hollywood Reporter. Hutton also called the shots on two films toplined by Elizabeth Taylor: the drama X, Y and Zee (1972), also starring Michael Caine and Susannah York, and Night Watch (1973),

read more

»

- Mike Barnes

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Big Flops For Big Stars: A Look Back At ABC's Ill-fated Venture Into Feature Films

21 July 2014 3:35 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Woody Allen's Take the Money and Run was pivotal in launching his career as a credible actor and leading man. Although considered a comedy classic today, the 1969 film actually lost money at the time of its release.

By Brian Hannan

All you need is top stars and top directors and making movies is easy. Surely you couldn’t miss with a line-up that included Sean Connery, Steve McQueen, Michael Caine, Dustin Hoffman, Lee Marvin, Omar Sharif, and directors of the calibre of Robert Aldrich (hot after The Dirty Dozen), John Boorman (Point Blank) and Woody Allen. Or so ABC must have thought when it set up a movie division in the late 1960s. Delving into the archives recently, I discovered that Sam Peckinpah’s rodeo picture Junior Bonner (1972) starring Steve McQueen was a box office stinkeroo. The picture lost $2.8m (about $15m in today’s money). Not just on domestic release, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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The Definitive Kubrickian Films: 20-11

19 March 2014 10:53 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

My first real attempt at understanding the brilliance that was Stanley Kubrick came in my freshman year of college, when I wrote a research paper on 2001: A Space Odyssey for an English class. After all that work, I only received a B and found myself more confused than ever. But there it was – the spark that Stanley Kubrick’s work produces. Kubrick’s best films were experiences; it’s impossible to “half-watch” one of his many masterpieces. And that’s what the movies on this list do. They take you on an odyssey of visual wonder, psychological tremors, and expect you to do as much work as the people involved in the making of the films. Yet, in the end, Kubrick’s films didn’t feel like homework. They felt like vacations to a world where deep thought is a welcome respite.

20. The Thin Red Line (1998)

Directed by Terrence Malick

What makes it Kubrickian? »

- Joshua Gaul

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Movie Poster of the Week: Lesser-Known Oscar Nominees of the 60s and 70s

1 March 2014 10:59 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The poster for Voyage of the Damned makes a bold claim, and maybe those who saw Stuart Rosenberg’s star-studded blockbuster in 1976 have remembered it ever since. Until a couple of weeks ago, however, when I saw it in a list of past Oscar nominees, I had never heard of it, and I don’t think it would be unfair to say that it is a film that has not stood the test of time.

Voyage of the Damned, which chronicles the tragic failed escape of 937 Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, was nominated for three Oscars (for Best Score, Best Adapted Screenplay, and for Lee Grant for Best Supporting Actress, the lone acting nominee among a boatload of international heavyweights).

Oscar nominations, especially for acting, tend to confer a certain amount of immortality on their recipients (you are forever “Academy Award nominee Lee Grant”) and there are many films and »

- Adrian Curry

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Altman’s Unsung ’70s

20 January 2014 1:50 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Director Robert Altman had his fair share of ups and downs. The oscillation between works widely lauded and those typically forgotten is prevalent throughout his exceptionally diverse career. This was — and still is — certainly the case with his 1970s output. This decade of remarkable work saw the release of now established classics like M*A*S*H, Nashville, and McCabe & Mrs. Miller, as well as a picture like 3 Women, which would gradually gain a cult following of sorts and subsequently be regarded as a quality movie despite its initial dismissal. But couched between and around these features are more electric and generally more unorthodox films. There are multiple titles from this, arguably Altman’s most creative of decades, that remain generally unheralded to all but his most ardent of admirers.

For Altman, the 1970s began with this disparity. The first year of the decade saw the release of M*A*S*H, »

- Jeremy Carr

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004

12 items from 2014


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