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The Curious Languor of Robert Mitchum

  • MUBI
Everyone notices the eyes first, languid, those of a somnambulist. Robert Mitchum, calm and observant, is a presence that, through passivity, enamors a viewer. His face is as effulgent as moonlight. The man smolders, with that boozy, baritone voice, seductive and soporific, a cigarette perched between wispy lips below which is a chin cleft like a geological fault. He’s slithery with innuendo. There’s an effortless allure to it all, a mix of malaise and braggadocio, a cocksure machismo and a hint of fragility. He’s ever-cool, a paradox, “radiating heat without warmth,” as Richard Brody said. A poet, a prodigious lover and drinker, a bad boy; his penchant for marijuana landed him in jail, and in the photographs from his two-month stay he looks like a natural fit. He sits, wrapped in denim, legs spread wide, hair shiny and slick, holding a cup of coffee. His mouth is
See full article at MUBI »

New to Streaming: ‘Alien: Covenant,’ ‘Shin Godzilla,’ ‘Adaptation,’ ‘Slack Bay,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Adaptation (Spike Jonze)

It’s almost depressing to rewatch Adaptation in 2016, because it’s a reminder of how strong an actor Nicolas Cage is when he actually invests himself in good projects. It was soon after this that his career went off the rails, but he’s remarkably impressive here, playing the dual roles of Charlie Kaufman and his fictional twin brother, Donald. As much a mind-fuck as any other Kaufman screenplay,
See full article at The Film Stage »

All of the Films Joining FilmStruck’s Criterion Channel this August

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This August will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Tuesday, August 1

Tuesday’s Short + Feature: These Boots and Mystery Train

Music is at the heart of this program, which pairs a zany music video by Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki with a tune-filled career highlight from American independent-film pioneer Jim Jarmusch. In the 1993 These Boots, Kaurismäki’s band of pompadoured “Finnish Elvis” rockers, the Leningrad Cowboys, cover a Nancy Sinatra classic in their signature deadpan style. It’s the perfect prelude to Jarmusch’s 1989 Mystery Train, a homage to the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll and the musical legacy of Memphis, featuring appearances by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Joe Strummer.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance
'Under the Volcano' screening: John Huston's 'quality' comeback featuring daring Albert Finney tour de force As part of its John Huston film series, the UCLA Film & Television Archive will be presenting the 1984 drama Under the Volcano, starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, and Anthony Andrews, on July 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Billy Wilder Theater in the Los Angeles suburb of Westwood. Jacqueline Bisset is expected to be in attendance. Huston was 77, and suffering from emphysema for several years, when he returned to Mexico – the setting of both The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Night of the Iguana – to direct 28-year-old newcomer Guy Gallo's adaptation of English poet and novelist Malcolm Lowry's 1947 semi-autobiographical novel Under the Volcano, which until then had reportedly defied the screenwriting abilities of numerous professionals. Appropriately set on the Day of the Dead – 1938 – in the fictitious Mexican town of Quauhnahuac (the fact that it sounds like Cuernavaca
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Jonathan Sothcott interview: producing independent films in the UK

Kirsten Howard Aug 8, 2017

Producer Jonathan Sothcott talks about running an independent film company in the UK, finding the right project and a post-Brexit industry.

Jonathan Sothcott has had a hand in producing a whole lot of independent films here in the UK over the last decade. You may have even seen a fair few of them yourself, especially if you’re a Danny Dyer completest.

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He’s the man behind Hereford Films, the production and financing company he runs with partner Damien Morley. If that name rings a bell, it might well be because Morley owns a modelling agency that takes care of most of the Page 3 girls, and the entrepreneur has even recently launched a bid to buy the Page 3 brand off The Sun himself.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Greatest Car Chases of All-Time

For decades, the car chase has existed as a timeless equalizer, settling scores with stomach-churning speed and velocity. The best of these chases employ vintage muscle-cars with practical effects and stunt work to achieve these amazing shots in camera. If CGI is used in the scene, it’s only to sweeten the practical effects and stunts.

The landscape is an equally essential ingredient, providing opportunities and obstacles for the drivers to embrace and overcome. The car chase grounds the action in an identifiable reality, menacing us with the ever-present possibility of death at high-speed. It also taps into something deep within everyone who’s ever gotten behind the wheel of a car: driving fast is as addictive as it is life-threatening.

The newest film from director Edgar Wright, Baby Driver, mixes the filmmakers love for the classic car chase genre with a killer soundtrack. To explain, the plot follows Baby,
See full article at The Film Stage »

12 Movies to Watch After You See ‘Free Fire’

We recommend titles that influenced Ben Wheatley and more.

With his sixth feature, Ben Wheatley finally has a wide release in America. Free Fire might be his most accessible movie yet, consisting a single location and pretty much just one long action sequence. It’s basically a 90-minute third act without the first two acts getting in the way. Also it features Oscar winner Brie Larson, and who doesn’t like watching her act?

If you like what you see, then you’ll want to discover Wheatley’s other work, starting with the small crime film Down Terrace, which kicked off his career. I also recommend the following dozen movies, some of which are direct influences on Wheatley, others being similar kinds of films, and then just whatever else I had determined worthy.

The Truce Hurts (1948)

Ben Wheatley loves Tom and Jerry cartoons and has cited them as an influence on his latest movie. I
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

80s fantasy movie moments that terrified us as kids

Ryan Lambie Mar 22, 2017

Fearsome monsters, grasping hands, and a suggestive tree. Here are 10 fantasy movie moments that scarred us as kids...

Sooner or later, you're going to see a scary movie. Whether you sneak down and watch a horror film on late night television, watch a Nightmare On Elm Street sequel round a friend's house or watch clips of slasher movies on YouTube, horror movies are always out there, waiting in the wings for the young and curious.

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But long before most of us graduate to the stage of our lives where we start seeking out 18-rated movies of gore and terror, we reliably encounter scary moments in what might initially seem to be harmless family adventure films.

The 1980s was an
See full article at Den of Geek »

10 Crucial George Segal Roles Beyond ‘The Goldbergs’

10 Crucial George Segal Roles Beyond ‘The Goldbergs’
George Segal rode talent and a hot streak to the top of the movie heap from the mid-1960s into the 1980s. If you only know Segal for his popular TV series “Just Shoot Me” and “The Goldbergs,” here are crucial earlier roles to check out.

King Rat (1965), dir. Bryan Forbes:

This was a break-out role for Segal, a prestigious WWII drama with a mostly British cast that included John Mills, Tom Courtenay, James Fox, Patrick O’Neal, and Denholm Elliott. Segal played a charismatically amoral American sharpie, scrambling to maintain his place at the top of the black-market heap in a Japanese prison camp.

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), dir. Mike Nichols:

Segal earned his lone Oscar nomination for this role, in Nichols’ adaptation of Edward Albee’s stinging marital drama. He brought brains and vulnerability as a college professor who, with his mousy wife (Sandy Dennis
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Art of More’ Season 2 Trailer: Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth Return In Crackle’s Auctioneering Drama

‘The Art of More’ Season 2 Trailer: Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth Return In Crackle’s Auctioneering Drama
Crackle has gained a foothold in the streaming service game with shows like Jerry Seinfeld’s “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” the recent tech thriller “StartUp” and the upcoming series “Snatch” based on Guy Ritchie’s 2000 film. But next month will see the return of the service’s flagship drama “The Art of More,” starring Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth in a series about the greedy, desperate world of the New York auction scene.

Read More: Review: ‘The Art of More’ and Why Crackle Needs a Hit Right Out of the Gate

In the second season, the show’s characters will attempt to achieve greater levels of success while becoming more like the frauds and forgeries they attempt to sell. Graham Connor (Christian Cooke) must re-start his career in the auction business to help the FBI take down a prominent collector; Roxanna Whitman (Kate Bosworth) vies for the top spot
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘The Art of More’ Season 2 Trailer: Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth Return In Crackle’s Auctioneering Drama

  • Indiewire
‘The Art of More’ Season 2 Trailer: Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth Return In Crackle’s Auctioneering Drama
Crackle has gained a foothold in the streaming service game with shows like Jerry Seinfeld’s “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” the recent tech thriller “StartUp” and the upcoming series “Snatch” based on Guy Ritchie’s 2000 film. But next month will see the return of the service’s flagship drama “The Art of More,” starring Dennis Quaid and Kate Bosworth in a series about the greedy, desperate world of the New York auction scene.

Read More: Review: ‘The Art of More’ and Why Crackle Needs a Hit Right Out of the Gate

In the second season, the show’s characters will attempt to achieve greater levels of success while becoming more like the frauds and forgeries they attempt to sell. Graham Connor (Christian Cooke) must re-start his career in the auction business to help the FBI take down a prominent collector; Roxanna Whitman (Kate Bosworth) vies for the top spot
See full article at Indiewire »

James Horner's 25 most magnificent scores

Sean Wilson Oct 11, 2016

From Star Trek and Field Of Dreams to The Rocketeer and Krull: we salute the film scores of the late, great James Horner.

When composer James Horner died in a plane crash in June 2015, cinema lost one of its most profoundly emotional voices, and the final chapter on Horner's astonishing career has now closed with his last work: Antoine Fuqua's Western remake The Magnificent Seven. Horner actually wrote the score based on the script before the film even started production, such was his passion for it, and it's been posthumously completed by his longtime collaborator Simon Franglen.

To mark the occasion, here are the 25 most seminal scores from a lamented, legendary figure of film music.

1. Legends Of The Fall (1994)

Despite his reputation as a composer of melodrama, throughout much of the eighties and early nineties Horner had largely been pegged as a bold composer of action,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Criterion Close-Up – Episode 49 – Twilight Time Appreciation Show

We change things up by focusing on a boutique label, Twilight Time, that has found success through a unique business model. Mark and Aaron happen to be big fans, and feel that we have directly contributed towards some of their profits. We talk about the company, their business model, why they have succeeded, and we address some common critiques. We also review a few discs each, and finally count down our favorite Twilight Time titles.

About Nick Redman:

London-born Nick Redman, one of Hollywood’s leading producers of movie music, is also an award-winning documentary filmmaker. An Academy Award nominee as producer of the 1996 Warner Brothers documentary, The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage, he went on to write, produce, and direct A Turning of the Earth: John Ford, John Wayne and The Searchers (1998), which became a prize-winner at multiple film festivals.

As a consultant to the Fox Music
See full article at CriterionCast »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier played the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing Schiff as D.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94
Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier starred as the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Interview: Actor Paul Dooley on Getting to Portray Dad

Chicago – After he reigned as the father in the classic 1979 film “Breaking Away,” actor Paul Dooley suddenly became everyone’s Dad – and by everyone that meant Molly Ringwald (“Sixteen Candles”), Julia Roberts (“Runaway Bride”) and Helen Hunt (“Mad About You”). He tells all in Part Two of a comprehensive interview.

The former “Paul Brown’ was born in West Virginia, and studied acting at West Virginia University, before heading to New York City and a new career as Paul Dooley. He did stage work, stand-up comedy and the New York City version of The Second City. He got his big break in the original stage version of “The Odd Couple” in 1965, directed by the legendary Mike Nichols. While working the stage, he appeared in a number of commercials, eventually moving to Los Angeles to “be where the action is.”

Paul Dooley (right) Being Dad with Justin Henry and Carlin Glynn in
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

TV Review: ‘The Dresser’

TV Review: ‘The Dresser’
Actors are not like everyone else, and that assessment is both a compliment and a diagnosis in “The Dresser,” a play by Ronald Harwood that has been turned into a claustrophobic but ultimately affecting TV movie starring Ian McKellen and Anthony Hopkins.

The setting will be familiar to those who’ve seen the play or the 1983 Peter Yates film based on it. In a provincial dressing room during WWII, an aging actor-manager known only as Sir (Hopkins) prepares to play King Lear, but it’s an understatement to say he has trouble focusing on his upcoming performance, or anything else, for that matter. He is eventually propelled into work mode by the sheer force of will of his dresser, Norman (McKellen).

Is Sir mentally or physically ill, or has he begun to slip into dementia? The parallels between the character and Lear are many, and the premise supports plenty of different readings.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

11 Good Movies to Watch on Hulu in March 2016

That’s right. Hulu. I’m here to tell you that there’s a cinematic streaming goldmine available on Hulu that includes recent hits, older classics, domestic releases, and foreign imports. It’s even home to hundreds of Criterion titles. Sure there’s plenty of filler and seemingly thousands of titles I’ve never heard of before, but I’m not here to talk about possible gems like The Christmas Clause… I’m here to recommend some good movies to watch this month on Hulu. Pick of the Month: Memories of Murder (2003) A serial killer is stalking women in rural South Korea, and the police seem powerless to stop him. A lack of resources, political upheaval, and conflicts between the local cops and a big-city detective strain the investigation, but as more weeks pass more women fall victim. Bong Joon-ho (The Host, Mother) hasn’t made a bad movie yet, and
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Giveaway – Win crime masterpiece The Friends of Eddie Coyle starring Robert Mitchum

We have three copies to give away this gripping tale of low-lives and loyalties starring Robert Mitchum and Peter Boyle.

Peter Yates, the Oscar-nominated director of riveting crime classics Robbery and Bullitt, teamed up with the incomparable Robert Mitchum for an unforgettable excursion into Boston’s criminal underworld.

Based on the acclaimed novel by George V. Higgins, The Friends of Eddie Coyle follows an ageing gunrunner’s troubles at the peripheries of the local mob once he finds his options split disastrously between the threat of a fresh prison sentence or police cooperation.

One of the best, most unexpected gangster films of the 1970s, The Friends of Eddie Coyle is a gripping tale of low-lives and loyalties, presented with the director’s trademark authenticity and naturalism, and an extraordinary array of performances, led by a never-better Mitchum. The Masters of Cinema Series is proud to present this masterpiece for the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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