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NYC Weekend Watch: Michelangelo Antonioni, Roman Hollywood, Studio Ghibli and More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of Modern Art

An all-inclusive Michelangelo Antonioni retrospective has kicked off.

Metrograph

“Goth(ic)” continues with an all-timer of a weekend.

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg screens on Friday.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

“The Non-Actor” has its final weekend.

Museum of the Moving Image

Rialto retrospective continues with the likes of Hiroshima, mon amour and Rififi.
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: Goth(ic), Maurice Pialat, William Wyler & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Lynch, Hitchcock, Bride of Frankenstein and more come together in “Goth(ic).”

Letter from an Unknown Woman and The Umbrellas of Cherbourg also screen.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

Rossellini, Murnau, Warhol, Pialat and more screen as part of “The Non-Actor.”

Film Forum

The Passion of Joan of Arc has its final days

One of Murnau’s greatest films,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Military-Themed Projects Aim to Raise Empathy for American Vets

Military-Themed Projects Aim to Raise Empathy for American Vets
Even before “Wings” won the first Academy Award for best picture in 1929, stories about soldiers and the military were already a staple of the big screen. Nearly ninety years later, the circumstances of their service have changed, but the nobility of their sacrifice endures, inspiring film and television storytellers alike to continue to pay them tribute with complex, rousing tales of heroism on and off the battlefield.

Spurred by patriotism and the promise of a window into the daily lives of soldiers, audiences have readily embraced military-themed films and shows, from “Band of Brothers” to “American Sniper” to last year’s “Hacksaw Ridge.” But an upcoming wave of projects offers filmmakers the opportunity — and responsibility — to explore the lives of United States veterans more authentically than ever before, drawing upon firsthand accounts from real-life heroes to both do justice and lend credulity to stories both fictional and fact-based without succumbing to jingoistic clichés.

Making his directorial
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Desert Hearts

By 1985 Hollywood had still only dabbled in movies about the ‘shame that cannot speak its name,’ and in every case the verdict for the transgressors was regret and misery, if not death. Donna Deitch’s brilliant drama achieves exactly what she wanted, to do make a movie about a lesbian relationship that doesn’t end in a tragedy.

Desert Hearts

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 902

1985 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 96 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date November 14, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Helen Shaver, Patricia Charbonneau, Audra Lindley, Andra Akers, Gwen Welles, Dean Butler, James Staley, Katie La Bourdette, Alex McArthur, Tyler Tyhurst, Denise Crosby, Antony Ponzini, Brenda Beck, Jeffrey Tambor.

Cinematography: Robert Elswit

Film Editor: Robert Estrin

Production Design: Jeannine Oppewall

Written by Natalie Cooper from the novel by Jane Rule

Produced and Directed by Donna Deitch

Desert Hearts is a fine movie that’s also one of the first features ever about a lesbian romance,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Foreplays #6: David Lynch's "Premonition Following an Evil Deed"

  • MUBI
Foreplays is a column that explores under-known short films by renowned directors. David Lynch's Premonition Following an Evil Deed (1995) is free to watch below. We’ve heard it often in relation to Twin Peaks: The Return (2017): “David Lynch has pulverized television” (or “dynamited television,” or “dropped a bomb on television”—pick your favorite variation). Despite being somewhat annoying, especially when repeated incessantly as a mantra, these slogan-like statements carry some truth. Every genuine act of innovation starts with a bit of destruction. However, it’s not the medium that Lynch blows up, but the rules and conventions associated with it. He has done this many times throughout his career: with the aesthetics of analogue film and low definition cameras, with serialized narratives, and compact (even ultra-short) durations. For Lynch, exploring the possibilities of a given medium often means turning it upside down in order to shake off the expectations attached to it,
See full article at MUBI »

'Thank You for Your Service' Review: Ptsd Drama Is 'Too Timid by Half'

'Thank You for Your Service' Review: Ptsd Drama Is 'Too Timid by Half'
You can't watch a frame of Jason Hall's Thank You for Your Service, about Iraq war veterans suffering from Pstd, without believing the film's intentions are honorable. Points for that, for sure. Yet as filmmaking – this is Hall's feature directing debut – Thank You for Service seems too timid by half, crucially lacking in the outrage that should be its core value. Hall's screenplay – he also wrote the far more effective American Sniper for director Clint Eastwood – is based on David Finkel's 2013 nonfiction book. But the film has a
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Link Roundup

Nyt Dan Kois profiles 'the loose screw rattling around inside the Marvel machine,' director Taika Waititi as Thor Ragnarok approaches

Film Stage Murtada interviews the director of Senegal's Oscar submission Félicité

Tfe ...which you may recall he raved about right here.

Variety Jamie Foxx and Anthony Mackie will star in a Johnny Cochran biopic (Mackie as Cochran) with Taylor Hackford directing

Guardian can Michael Fassbender survive his string of flops?

Coming Soon The Seagull starring The Bening and Saoirse Ronan will be distributed by Sony Pictures Classic next year

ScriptNotes John and Craig welcome female screenwriters Daley Haggar and Dara Resnik to discuss the possible Post-Weinstein era in Hollywood

The New Yorker Harvey Weinstein's cameo in a 2005 animated movie for Mattel

My New Plaid Pants five photos of rising French actor Rabah Nait Oufella

My New Plaid Pants 'do, dump, or marry' on Greg McLean's Jungle with
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Killer is Loose

Psycho killers long ago lost their novelty, but in 1956 Budd Boetticher and Wendell Corey gave us Leon ‘Foggy’ Poole, a screen original with limitless appeal. Imagine a time when ‘normalcy’ was so taken for granted that any weird behavior was enough to give us the chills? Foggy carries this crime potboiler with a refreshing new idea: his dangerous maniac looks more normal than normal people.

The Killer Is Loose

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1956 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 76 min. / Street Date June 13, 2017 / 29.98

Starring: Joseph Cotten, Rhonda Fleming, Wendell Corey, Alan Hale Jr., Michael Pate, John Larch, Dee J. Thompson, Virginia Christine.

Cinematography: Lucien Ballard

Original Music: Lionel Newman

Written by Harold Medford, story by John & Ward Hawkins

Produced by Robert L. Jacks

Directed by Budd Boetticher

A smartly directed mid-fifties noir with a sensational central performance from the overlooked Wendell Corey, The Killer is Loose shows director Budd Boetticher at ease with a modest budget,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Promise of Recovery: Close-Up on Robert Aldrich’s "Autumn Leaves"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Robert Aldrich's Autumn Leaves (1956) is playing October 22 - November 21, 2017 on Mubi in the United Kingdom. Autumn Leaves is the story of what happens to a Robert Aldrich hero after the Robert Aldrich movie ends. Vicious, cynical, and borderline nihilistic, Aldrich’s movies churned idealistic characters through crucibles of violence and disillusionment. He adored stories of marginalized nobodies forced to face impossible odds: murderers-turned-World War Two commandos in The Dirty Dozen (1967); desperate Chiricahua Apache raiders in Ulzana’s Raid (1972); a football team of prison inmates in The Longest Yard (1974); escaped military prisoners in Twilight’s Last Gleaming (1977). For these men—and they were usually men—death was one of the kindest fates possible. Existential meaninglessness, the pointlessness of moral causes, the uselessness of idealism: these were the fates they truly feared. And for Aldrich, these were the just rewards
See full article at MUBI »

Henri Alekan and the Shifting Technology of Film Lighting

By Jacob Oller

Cinematography owes much to the French master. enri Alekan was the cinematographer behind movies like Jean Cocteau’s magical La Belle et la Bête, William Wyler’s Roman Holiday, and Wim WendersWings of Desire. But his book on cinematography is perhaps his greatest legacy. Des lumières et des ombres has been a biblical tome for those […]

The article Henri Alekan and the Shifting Technology of Film Lighting appeared first on Film School Rejects.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

AFI, Kennedy Center Honors Founder George Stevens Jr. on His Youth Spent on His Father’s Film Sets

AFI, Kennedy Center Honors Founder George Stevens Jr. on His Youth Spent on His Father’s Film Sets
Fifty years ago, multiple Emmy Award winner George Stevens Jr. helped found the American Film Institute. The organization’s many activities include the annual AFI Fest and essential preservation efforts as well as televised salutes to top film creatives, which have earned Stevens Jr. two Emmy awards and 15 other nominations as a producer and writer. He came to AFI after growing up on sets where his father created cinematic masterpieces such as “A Place in the Sun,” “Shane” and “Giant.”

In 1961, Stevens Jr. went to Washington, D.C., at the behest of newsman Edward R. Murrow to supervise the film and TV output of the U.S. Information Agency. He later founded the Kennedy Center Honors. His career is filled with awards, including 17 Emmys (10 for his work on the “Kennedy Center Honors” telecasts), a 2013 Honorary Academy Award and eight Writers Guild trophies. He was first mentioned in Variety on Sept. 5, 1951, during
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Five Came Back’ Helmer & Author Laurent Bouzereau Inks With Wme

Exclusive: Wme has signed Laurent Bouzereau, the author and filmmaker who most recently co-produced and directed Netflix’s Five Came Back. The three-part, three-hour documentary series intriguingly chronicled the not-so-well-known efforts of five iconic Hollywood directors — William Wyler, John Huston, George Stevens, Frank Capra and John Ford — who put their careers on hold to help create propaganda films during World War II. The series hails from Amblin Television based…
See full article at Deadline »

Duel in the Sun

David O. Selznick’s absurdly over-cooked western epic is a great picture, even if much of it induces a kind of hypnotic, mouth-hanging-open disbelief. Is this monument to the sex appeal of Jennifer Jones, Kitsch in terrible taste, or have Selznick and his army of Hollywood talents found a new level of hyped melodramatic harmony? It certainly has the star-power, beginning with Gregory Peck as a cowboy rapist who learned his bedside manners from Popeye’s Bluto. It’s all hugely enjoyable.

Duel in the Sun

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1946 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 144 min. / Special Edition / Street Date August 15, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring Jennifer Jones, Gregory Peck, Joseph Cotten, Lionel Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Walter Huston, Butterfly McQueen, Charles Bickford, Tilly Losch.

Cinematography Lee Garmes, Ray Rennahan and Harold Rosson

Production Designer J. McMillan Johnson

Film Editor Hal C. Kern, John Saure and William H. Ziegler

Original Music Dimitri Tiomkin

Written by Niven Busch,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

You Only Live Once

Fritz Lang continues his take-no-prisoners indictment of America’s curious relationship with crime; this time he presents the thesis that an innocent man can be a pawn in cosmic game of injustice. Three-time loser Henry Fonda, the glummest actor in ’30s films, doesn’t mean to rob or kill, but gosh darn it, They Made Him a Criminal. Those considerations aside, it’s a wonderful cinematic achievement, made all the better by a decent digital restoration.

You Only Live Once

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1937 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 86 min. / Street Date July 25, 2017 / 29.98

Starring: Sylvia Sidney, Henry Fonda, Barton MacLane, Jean Dixon,

William Gargan, Jerome Cowan, Charles ‘Chic’ Sale, Margaret Hamilton, Warren Hymer,

Guinn ‘Big Boy’ Williams, Ward Bond, Jack Carson, Jonathan Hale

Cinematography: Leon Shamroy

Art Direction: Alexander Toluboff

Film Editor: Daniel Mandell

Original Music: Hugo Friedhofer

Written by Graham Baker and Gene Towne

Produced by Walter Wanger

Directed by Fritz Lang
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century
Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Dunkirk review – utterly immersive account of Allied retreat

Christopher Nolan is back to his best with this spectacular second world war action epic

“You can practically see it from here… ” Kenneth Branagh’s stoical naval commander is talking about “home”, the word that recurs throughout Christopher Nolan’s long-nurtured epic of wartime retreat. Yet he could equally have been referring to the Imax 70mm presentation in which I saw Dunkirk, and which was also probably visible from France – a jaw-dropping spectacle in which the picture for the most part stretched beyond my field of vision, both vertically and horizontally. “We have a big love for the big format,” says cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema, who works agile wonders with the bulky film cameras used to capture such stunning images. Available in a dizzying array of projection formats (digital, 35mm, 70mm etc), Dunkirk hits our screens with aspect ratios ranging from square to oblong and all points in between, depending
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review. Pressed for Time—Christopher Nolan's "Dunkirk"

Nowadays you can just get a ferry or the Eurostar and be there in a few relatively painless minutes, but had you hoped to cross the Strait of Dover from France to England in May 1940, you’d be in for some real hell. You might very well drown, or be crushed by the hull of a listing ship, or scorched alive by burning oil, or bombed, or shot. Or maybe all of these things at once, or in sequence. Worse still, you’d most likely have to do a lot of standing around and waiting for it beforehand. Back then, whatever side of history you were on, be it Axis or Allied, you’d still want to be on the English side of the Strait of Dover. Truly nobody wanted to cross the other way, from England to France. Yet many brave souls did so anyway, to rescue nearly 340,000 soldiers
See full article at MUBI »

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance
'Under the Volcano' screening: John Huston's 'quality' comeback featuring daring Albert Finney tour de force As part of its John Huston film series, the UCLA Film & Television Archive will be presenting the 1984 drama Under the Volcano, starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, and Anthony Andrews, on July 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Billy Wilder Theater in the Los Angeles suburb of Westwood. Jacqueline Bisset is expected to be in attendance. Huston was 77, and suffering from emphysema for several years, when he returned to Mexico – the setting of both The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Night of the Iguana – to direct 28-year-old newcomer Guy Gallo's adaptation of English poet and novelist Malcolm Lowry's 1947 semi-autobiographical novel Under the Volcano, which until then had reportedly defied the screenwriting abilities of numerous professionals. Appropriately set on the Day of the Dead – 1938 – in the fictitious Mexican town of Quauhnahuac (the fact that it sounds like Cuernavaca
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

15 Essential Movies Shot On 70mm Film, From ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ to ‘Dunkirk’

15 Essential Movies Shot On 70mm Film, From ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ to ‘Dunkirk’
70mm is back! Thanks to Paul Thomas Anderson, Quentin Tarantino and Christopher Nolan, one of the oldest and grandest traditions in Hollywood is making a comeback after years of financial setbacks and near-extinction. As Nolan has said many times, shooting in 70mm proved an immersive and more textured experience than any other form of cinema (side note: The 70mm film process actually uses 65mm film stock, which is printed onto 70mm film for projection purposes).

Read More: ‘Dunkirk’: 9 Things You Need to Know About Christopher Nolan’s WWII Blockbuster

Due to the costly nature of film and theaters’ lack of 70mm projectors, it’s been quite a challenge to get to a place where Tarantino and Nolan can make entire features using 65/70mm, but the preservation of film is turning in their favor. This month, “Dunkirk” will give audiences the chance to see what happens when Nolan makes an
See full article at Indiewire »

Good Bad Man Cortez: Final Interview Segment with Biographer of The Great Hollywood Heel

Good Bad Man Cortez: Final Interview Segment with Biographer of The Great Hollywood Heel
'The Magnificent Ambersons': Directed by Orson Welles, and starring Tim Holt (pictured), Dolores Costello (in the background), Joseph Cotten, Anne Baxter, and Agnes Moorehead, this Academy Award-nominated adaptation of Booth Tarkington's novel earned Ricardo Cortez's brother Stanley Cortez an Academy Award nomination for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White. He lost to Joseph Ruttenberg for William Wyler's blockbuster 'Mrs. Miniver.' Two years later, Cortez – along with Lee Garmes – would win Oscar statuettes for their evocative black-and-white work on John Cromwell's homefront drama 'Since You Went Away,' starring Ricardo Cortez's 'Torch Singer' leading lady, Claudette Colbert. In all, Stanley Cortez would receive cinematography credit in more than 80 films, ranging from B fare such as 'The Lady in the Morgue' and the 1940 'Margie' to Fritz Lang's 'Secret Beyond the Door,' Charles Laughton's 'The Night of the Hunter,' and Nunnally Johnson's 'The Three Faces
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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