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See a Sneak Peek of Supernatural Episode 9.21 - King of the Damned

We don't know about you guys, but we're gonna just forget that last week's episode of "Supernatural" happened and instead focus on tonight's Ep. #9.21, "King of the Damned." In fact, here's a clip to help wash away any remaining traces of the bad taste left by that whole spinoff idea.

"Supernatural" Episode 9.21 - "King of the Damned" (airs 5/6/14, 9-10pm): Castiel (Misha Collins) captures one of Metatron’s angels (guest star Gordon Woolvet) and asks Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean (Jensen Ackles) for help with the interrogation.

Dean eagerly accepts, which doesn’t go unnoticed by Sam.

Meanwhile, Abaddon (guest star Alaina Huffman) demands Crowley (Mark Sheppard) help her kill Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean (Jensen Ackles). When he refuses, she reveals her shocking bargaining chip.

Also, Castiel (Misha Collins) sets a meeting with Gadreel (guest star Tahmoh Penikett). Pj Pesce directed the episode written by Eugenie Ross-Leming and Brad Buckner.
See full article at Dread Central »

Supernatural S9, E21 Promo; "King Of The Damned"

"Castiel (Misha Collins) captures one of Metatron‘s angels (guest star Gordon Woolvet) and asks Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean (Jensen Ackles) for help with the interrogation. Dean eagerly accepts, which doesn‘t go unnoticed by Sam. Meanwhile, Abaddon (guest star Alaina Huffman) demands Crowley (Mark Sheppard) help her kill Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean (Jensen Ackles). When he refuses, she reveals her shocking bargaining chip. Also, Castiel (Misha Collins) sets a meeting with Gadreel (guest star Tahmoh Penikett).
See full article at ComicBookMovie »

It's a Shake Down in this Promo for Supernatural Episode 9.21 - King of the Damned

Once again The CW has given "Supernatural" an extra episode in its season so instead of just two installments left this year, we have three! What's up next week in Episode 9.21, "King of the Damned"? Abaddon blackmails Crowley, for one thing! Here's the promo.

"Supernatural" Episode 9.21 - "King of the Damned" (airs 5/6/14, 9-10pm): Castiel (Misha Collins) captures one of Metatron’s angels (guest star Gordon Woolvet) and asks Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean (Jensen Ackles) for help with the interrogation. Dean eagerly accepts, which doesn’t go unnoticed by Sam.

Meanwhile, Abaddon (guest star Alaina Huffman) demands Crowley (Mark Sheppard) help her kill Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean (Jensen Ackles). When he refuses, she reveals her shocking bargaining chip.

Also, Castiel (Misha Collins) sets a meeting with Gadreel (guest star Tahmoh Penikett). Pj Pesce directed the episode written by Eugenie Ross-Leming and Brad Buckner.

For more info visit "Supernatural" on cwtv.
See full article at Dread Central »

Snuffed Out, Too: More TV Series That Were Gone Too Soon

Last month, as the fate of ABC's Gcb hung in the balance, we were worried it would become a member of the "Gone Too Soon" club, TV shows that were snuffed out before they had a chance to flourish, or at least before we had a chance to grow tired of them.

Sadly, Gcb has gone to that big Upn in the sky, where it can run happily in the meadow with the likes of Firefly, Pushing Daisies, and Manimal.

While we mourn Gcb's loss, let's take a look at more shows that were ended too quickly. They were unappreciated at the the time, but they were either too good or too ... interesting ... not to have been offered the opportunity to flourish. Or flame out. Which is just as good.

The Comeback

HBO (June 5, 2005 – September 4, 2005)

Lisa Kudrow could have played it safe with her follow-up series to Friends, but instead
See full article at The Backlot »

Viff Preview Round-up of Films, Parties, Zombies, Rockers and Hockey

The Vancouver International Film Festival kicks off in earnest tonight after a few days of panels Vancouver Film and Television Forums. The fest certainly doesn’t have the high profile of Toronto International Film Festival or Festival Du Cannes to be sure but its a growing fest in a beautiful city so who’s complaining.

Whether you are in Vancouver or following along at home, here is a menu of resources to peruse and enjoy (unless of course you are instead watching the Canucks hockey season kick-off tonight instead with the rest of Vancouver except for the people at the Whitecaps vs. Timbers soccer playoffs).

Westender’s Precious Spector

Vancouver’s WestEnder arts and culture magazine provides Movies: Top picks for this year’s Viff.

We tag ‘The Agony and The Ecstasy of Phil Spector‘ saying, “He is, of course, a convicted murderer and the proud owner of many ridiculous wigs.
See full article at MovieSet.com »

Film review: 'Bride of Chucky'

Film review: 'Bride of Chucky'
Determined not to be outscreamed by the competition, the once-dominant house of horrors at Universal is back in business with killer doll Chucky, a king-size cult franchise dating back to 1988's "Child's Play".

Starring the sizzlingly vampish Jennifer Tilly and directed by Hong Kong veteran Ronny Yu ("Warriors of Virtue"), "Bride of Chucky" is bloody good fun, when one isn't repulsed by its brutality. Needless to say, standards have changed tremendously since the studio created the "Bride of Frankenstein".

In fact, James Whales' 1935 classic is directly referenced in the story of a possessed, homicidal doll brought back to life after barely surviving three previous films. In this post-"Scream" era of savvy teen chillers, "Bride of Chucky" is irreverent toward itself, with the characters aware of Chucky's previous exploits.

Opening with the throat-cutting of an unlucky pawn by very bad girl Tiffany (Tilly), "Bride of Chucky" is graphic and shocking, darkly humorous and kinkily sexual. From man-slayer Tiffany's habit of wearing lingerie as she performs demonic rituals to the preposterously funny lovemaking of Chucky and his new doll-bride later on, the scenario sticks with the twisted romance of two monsters who are most compatible when causing mayhem and suffering.

Tiffany, who was Chucky's girlfriend before he died and his evil spirit moved to a doll, pieces together the little demon rescued from a police warehouse. Tattooed, pierced weirdo Damien (Alexis Arquette) shows up in her trailer at the wrong time, and Tiffany makes the awakened-after-years Chucky (voice by Brad Dourif) jealous.

But after the little fiend has his fun, unamused Tiffany locks him up. Wanting Chucky to suffer because she has truly loved him all these years and he laughed at the idea of marriage, Tiffany has a vicious sense of humor and gets him a cutesy girl doll.

It's Tiffany's turn next as Chucky escapes and she dies horribly when a TV monitor showing "Bride of Frankenstein" is dropped into the tub while she's bathing. Tilly in the flesh goes out with a memorable scream and is reborn as the voice of Tiffany the doll. Of course, it's not a marriage made in heaven, with Tiffany retaining a soft spot for true romance and Chucky treating her badly.

The regular humans of the story are not nearly as entertaining, with attractive duo Katherine Heigl and Nick Stabile playing young lovers who end up with the dolls on a wild ride to Niagara Falls and New Jersey. Also making the trip is the local police chief (John Ritter), albeit as a corpse with about 20 nails in his head. Meanwhile, trying to help out his fugitive friends, who are being blamed for Chucky and Tiffany's trail of corpses, David Gordon Michael Woolvett) is pulverized into spaghetti and meatballs by a big-rig truck.

BRIDE OF CHUCKY

Universal Pictures

A David Kirschner production

Director: Ronny Yu

Screenwriter: Don Mancini

Producers: David Kirschner, Grace Gilroy

Executive producers: Don Mancini, Corey Sienega

Director of photography: Peter Pau

Production designer: Alicia Keywan

Editors: David Wu, Randolph K. Bricker

Puppet effects: Kevin Yagher

Music: Graeme Revell

Costume designer: Lynne MacKay

Casting: Joanna Colbert, Ross Clydesdale

Color/stereo

Cast:

Tiffany: Jennifer Tilly

Chucky: Brad Dourif

Jade: Katherine Heigl

Jesse: Nick Stabile

Damien: Alexis Arquette

David: Gordon Michael Woolvett

Warren: John Ritter

Running time -- 89 minutes

MPAA rating: R

See also

Credited With | External Sites