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News Bits: The Indie Beat Edition!

  • Cinelinx
We have some amazing things we're about to announce for Cinelinx, and we've been working our tails off in order to get them done.  While this is great, it unfortunately means that I haven't kept up with my press releases like I should have been.  There's been a few things going on in the Indie world, so I've decided to bring them all together, News Bits style, for your enjoyment.  Come inside for casting news on Kickback, a new trailer for Entity, and a North American release date for Silent Cry!

Here at Cinelinx we like to talk about all aspects of filmmaking and movie news. To that end, we have Indie Beat where we highlight some of the latest news, trailers, and PR releases from the indie filmmaker scene.  So if you're an independent filmmaker and want some coverage on our site, be sure to drop us a line at  jordan@cinelinx.
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Silent Cry heard in North America

  • ScreenDaily
Silent Cry heard in North America
Thriller goes to Us, Benelux and Scandinavia.

Music Video Distribution has acquired North American rights to Julian Richards thriller Silent Cry.

Additional deals have closed with Zeno Pictures for Benelux and Njuta for Scandinavia.

Emily Woof, Douglas Henshall, Kevin Whately, Clive Russell and Frank Finlay star in the urban chase thriller about corruption and murder in the medical world.

Simon Lubert wrote the script, producers are Peter La Terriere and Tim Dennison. Executive producers are Keith Hayley and Robert Bevan.

Screen Media Ventures handles sales.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Rufus Sewell: almost famous

Rufus Sewell was a pin-up in the 1990s, then his career stalled. He tells us about moving to La, giving up drinking and why he can't wait to lose his looks

There was a moment in the mid-1990s when Rufus Sewell's international stardom was assured. Before his 30th birthday, he had starred in two hugely successful TV adaptations, of Middlemarch and Cold Comfort Farm, and taken a lead role in the original production of Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, alongside Felicity Kendal and Bill Nighy. He would clearly become stupidly famous. But then he… didn't.

"People talk about opportunity knocking," he says, "but the gate was always swinging in the breeze before I got to the door. I was the lead in Interview With The Vampire, until Tom Cruise decided he was interested. I was in The Wings Of The Dove with Uma Thurman, until that got cancelled. I
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Rufus Sewell: almost famous

Rufus Sewell was a pin-up in the 1990s, then his career stalled. He tells us about moving to La, giving up drinking and why he can't wait to lose his looks

There was a moment in the mid-1990s when Rufus Sewell's international stardom was assured. Before his 30th birthday, he had starred in two hugely successful TV adaptations, of Middlemarch and Cold Comfort Farm, and taken a lead role in the original production of Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, alongside Felicity Kendal and Bill Nighy. He would clearly become stupidly famous. But then he… didn't.

"People talk about opportunity knocking," he says, "but the gate was always swinging in the breeze before I got to the door. I was the lead in Interview With The Vampire, until Tom Cruise decided he was interested. I was in The Wings Of The Dove with Uma Thurman, until that got cancelled. I
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blu-ray Review: ‘Velvet Goldmine’ Sparkles Brighter Than Ever on Blu-ray

Chicago – Similar in style, structure and ambition to his 2007 kaleidoscopic portrait of Bob Dylan, “I’m Not There,” Todd Haynes’s 1998 effort “Velvet Goldmine,” takes a hallucinogenic trip through the ’70s glam rock period reigned over by David Bowie. Yet instead of centering his tale on Bowie, Haynes explores the era’s impact through the eyes of a haunted observer.

The film is less dramatically satisfying but far more interesting than a straightforward biopic. Jonathan Rhys Meyers’s striking features fit perfectly into the role of Bowie clone Brian Slade, but he remains an enigmatic object of interest and desire throughout the picture. That’s because his life is viewed solely through the perspective of others, as investigative reporter Arthur (Christian Bale) attempts to piece together the mystery of Slade’s whereabouts ten years after the singer faked his own death onstage.

Blu-ray Rating: 4.0/5.0

On a superficial level, “Goldmine” borrows the formula of “Citizen Kane,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Wondrous Oblivion

Palm Pictures

NEW YORK -- Director-screenwriter Paul Morrison, whose "Solomon and Gaenor" was nominated for a foreign-language film Oscar, delivers a sensitively wrought coming-of-age tale with this story of a young boy's initiation into both cricket and maturity at the hands of his Jamaican neighbor. Although it suffers at times from a case of the cutes and a few lapses into sentimentalism, "Wondrous Oblivion" is a touching effort boasting superior performances.

Set in a South London neighborhood in the 1960s, the story centers on 11-year-old David Wiseman (Sam Smith), who wants nothing more than to play cricket at the posh private school that his Jewish immigrant parents can ill afford. Unfortunately, his lack of skill prevents him from doing little more than handling the scoreboard.

When a friendly Jamaican family moves in next door, David is delighted to see patriarch Dennis (Delroy Lindo) setting up a cricket net in the backyard for his young daughter (Leonie Elliott). Before long, he takes the boy under his wing, tutoring him in the ways of the game.

Meanwhile, David's attractive mother Ruth (Emily Woof), feeling neglected by her older, workaholic husband (Stanley Townsend), begins to develop an intense attraction to the frequently shirtless Dennis. The interest shown by Ruth and her son to their new neighbors helps to fuel the prejudices of the bigoted townspeople.

With its complex characterizations and understated narrative, the film thankfully avoids melodrama in its sensitive handling of its socially conscious subject matter. The director also has elicited sterling performances from his cast, with Lindo and Woof in particular transcending any cliched aspects of their characters and young Smith delivering a winning performance as the cricket-obsessed David.

Wondrous Oblivion

Momentum Pictures

LONDON -- Writer-director Paul Morrison's "Wondrous Oblivion" is an unassuming story about a young boy's first exposure to racism in South London in 1960. It uses cricket in the same way that "Bend It Like Beckham" used soccer as the catalyst for learning and acceptance. However, without the attractive young women and with a game far less exciting to the uninitiated, "Oblivion" lacks the spark of the earlier film. Its future would appear to be on television and DVD.

David (Sam Smith) is an 11-year-old Jewish boy whose grandparents were killed in the Holocaust. His father, Victor Stanley Townsend), is earnest and industrious, and his mother, Ruth (Emily Woof), is devoted and keen to fit in to their London surroundings.

David loves cricket. He collects cricket cards the way American kids collect baseball cards. He has his bat and pads and knows all the game's etiquette. He's just not very good at playing it.

That changes, however, when a Jamaican family moves in next door and the father, Dennis (Delroy Lindo), puts up a cricket net in his back garden. Soon David is invited to play with Dennis' daughters, and his lack of skill becomes apparent. Inevitably, Dennis teaches David, and he makes it onto his school's first team. Just as inevitably, the white neighbors on the street, who have no idea that David's family is Jewish, object to the presence of a black family.

Ugliness develops, and it takes a racist attack on the black family's home, which is set on fire, to raise the consciousness of all around. This is a well-meaning film, and there is an unexpected development when Ruth develops an unhealthy crush on Dennis. Yet it plays out to little dramatic effect.

Lindo gives a typically restrained performance and is well matched by Woof. Smith and Leonie Elliott as Judy, one of Dennis' daughters, are both charming.

Wondrous Oblivion

Momentum Pictures

LONDON -- Writer-director Paul Morrison's "Wondrous Oblivion" is an unassuming story about a young boy's first exposure to racism in South London in 1960. It uses cricket in the same way that "Bend It Like Beckham" used soccer as the catalyst for learning and acceptance. However, without the attractive young women and with a game far less exciting to the uninitiated, "Oblivion" lacks the spark of the earlier film. Its future would appear to be on television and DVD.

David (Sam Smith) is an 11-year-old Jewish boy whose grandparents were killed in the Holocaust. His father, Victor Stanley Townsend), is earnest and industrious, and his mother, Ruth (Emily Woof), is devoted and keen to fit in to their London surroundings.

David loves cricket. He collects cricket cards the way American kids collect baseball cards. He has his bat and pads and knows all the game's etiquette. He's just not very good at playing it.

That changes, however, when a Jamaican family moves in next door and the father, Dennis (Delroy Lindo), puts up a cricket net in his back garden. Soon David is invited to play with Dennis' daughters, and his lack of skill becomes apparent. Inevitably, Dennis teaches David, and he makes it onto his school's first team. Just as inevitably, the white neighbors on the street, who have no idea that David's family is Jewish, object to the presence of a black family.

Ugliness develops, and it takes a racist attack on the black family's home, which is set on fire, to raise the consciousness of all around. This is a well-meaning film, and there is an unexpected development when Ruth develops an unhealthy crush on Dennis. Yet it plays out to little dramatic effect.

Lindo gives a typically restrained performance and is well matched by Woof. Smith and Leonie Elliott as Judy, one of Dennis' daughters, are both charming.

Sprockets gets lift from kid fare, 'Oblivion'

Sprockets gets lift from kid fare, 'Oblivion'
TORONTO -- The Sprockets Toronto International Film Festival for Kids unveiled its 2004 film lineup Tuesday, with British director Paul Morrison's Wondrous Oblivion taking the opening-night slot. Toronto also indicated that it will host a first-time market for international kids-movie buyers at this year's event, set to run April 16-25. Oblivion, Morrison's second feature, stars Delroy Lindo, Emily Woof and Stanley Townsend and is the story of a Jewish boy befriending a Jamaican family to learn about cricket and racial harmony. The lineup of 17 features and 42 shorts, representing 19 countries and 16 languages, also includes Journey to Little Rock: The Untold Story of Minnijean Brown Trickey, a documentary about one of nine black students who faced an angry mob in 1957 in Arkansas to break the racial barrier in Southern U.S. schools.

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