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Steven Spielberg, Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks on Why ‘The Post’ Resonates in Trump Era, #MeToo Movement

Steven Spielberg, Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks on Why ‘The Post’ Resonates in Trump Era, #MeToo Movement
WashingtonSteven Spielberg‘s “The Post” is certainly relevant at a time of attacks on the media — the constant refrain of “fake news” and blurred lines of alternative facts.

But the movie, depicting the drama surrounding The Washington Post’s decision to publish the Pentagon Papers in 1971, will also resonate in the #MeToo movement.

The plot may be a prelude to Watergate and “All the President’s Men,” but the movie is centered on publisher Katharine Graham (Meryl Streep), a leader with few if any counterparts of her gender, deciding to put it all on the line and side with her editor, Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks), in his push to print the papers.

At a screening of the movie at the Newseum on Thursday, there were cheers at a key moment in the movie when Graham makes her decision, telling her executives and Bradlee, “Let’s publish.”

Earlier on Thursday, Streep appeared
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House – Review

As we reach that light-at-the-end-of the-tunnel that concludes the 2017 movie year, theatres are now filled with stories “inspired by true events” and “biopics”. This new release is a bit of both, like last weekend’s Marshall, this tells the story of one man, while focusing on one major event or incident of his long life. Unlike the former Supreme Court justice, this person was not well known by the general public. However, his “nickname” became legendary, thanks in part to a Best Picture Oscar winner. Though the film’s title may sound seem like hyperbole, it presents much evidence to support it in Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House.

We first meet mark Felt (Liam Neeson) on a crisp May morning in 1972 as he readies himself for another day in DC as Deputy Associate Director of the FBI (the number three guy at the Bureau). After
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The Foreigner, Happy Death Day and Mark Felt make our What to Watch weekend preview

  • Cineplex
The Foreigner, Happy Death Day and Mark Felt make our What to Watch weekend previewThe Foreigner, Happy Death Day and Mark Felt make our What to Watch weekend previewTanner Zipchen10/12/2017 2:43:00 Pm

This weekend in theatres, we've got the Groundhog Day-style thriller Happy Death Day, political biopic Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House, and the return of Jackie Chan in The Foreigner.

In Happy Death Day, a blissfully self-centered college student wakes up on her birthday. As the morning goes on, she gets the eerie feeling that she's experienced the events of this day before. When a masked killer suddenly takes her life in a brutal attack, she once again magically wakes up unharmed as if the day never happened. Now, the frightened young woman must relive the same day over and over until she figures out who murdered her.

Liam Neeson stars in the story of Mark Felt,
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Film Review: Cautionary ‘Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House’

Chicago – Everything old is new again, in the 1970s story of the infamous “Deep Throat” – the source in the FBI who tipped off the Washington Post about the issues surrounding Watergate scandal – who revealed himself in 2005. He is now the subject of a new film, and is portrayed by Liam Neeson, in “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House.”

Rating: 3.5/5.0

It’s a blistering history lesson, and again the more revealed about the Richard M. Nixon administration the more it becomes clear that the Republican Party agenda was/is based in acquiring power rather than serving the American people. Mark Felt was an old-school FBI agent that wasn’t so innocent himself – he was somewhat of a bag boy for J. Edgar Hoover – but he saw injustice and used his power of knowing where the “bodies were buried” to bring down the corrupt Nixon. The film gets
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Movie Review – Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House (2017)

Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House, 2017.

Written and Directed by Peter Landesman.

Starring Liam Neeson, Martin Csokas, Michael C. Hall, Diane Lane, Ike Barinholtz, Bruce Greenwood, Maika Monroe, Josh Lucas, Tom Sizemore, Kate Walsh, Eddie Marsan, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Tony Goldwyn, Julian Morris, Brian d’Arcy James, and Noah Wyle.

Synopsis:

The story of Mark Felt, who under the name “Deep Throat” helped journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein uncover the Watergate scandal in 1974.

At one point during Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House the titular famed whistleblower states that “no force is stronger than FBI, not even the FBI”, which offers insight to just how big the Watergate scandal investigation was not just for citizens of the United States, but the country’s authority. For the first time in the history of the organization, they were being blacklisted from interviewing various aspects
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Diane Lane confronts Liam Neeson in Exclusive new clip from Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House

  • Cineplex
Diane Lane confronts Liam Neeson in Exclusive new clip from Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White HouseDiane Lane confronts Liam Neeson in Exclusive new clip from Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White HouseAdriana Floridia9/28/2017 1:08:00 Pm

Liam Neeson's new film has him starring as Mark Felt, otherwise known as "Deep Throat", the man who helped journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein uncover the Watergate scandal in 1974.

The film saw its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival earlier this month, and we have an exclusive clip to share with you! Diane Lane co-stars as Mark's wife, Audrey, and this clip sees an intense conversation between the couple.

Check out the clip below and see Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House in Cineplex theatres on October 13th!

See full article at Cineplex »

Watch Exclusive 'Mark Felt' Clip: They Don't Deserve You

  • Fandango
For more than 30 years, the true identity of "Deep Throat," the pseudonym given to a source of valuable information in the Watergate investigation by journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, was a carefully guarded secret. Now Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House brings the true story to the big screen. Liam Neeson stars as longtime FBI agent Mark Felt; Diane Lane portrays his supportive wife, Audrey Felt. In our exclusive clip, set in their home late at night,...

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Author Erin Carlson on Her New Book “I’ll Have What She’s Having” and the Legacy of Nora Ephron

Nora Ephron died in 2012, at the age of 71, but she left an indelible mark on the world as one of the most influential voices of our time. She left behind a strong legacy and continues to inspire new and emerging artists. So, it is no surprise that entertainment journalist Erin Carlson has chosen to write her first book about the late Hollywood powerhouse. In “I’ll Have What She’s Having” she takes readers behind the scenes of the writer-director’s three most successful movies: “When Harry Met Sally,” “Sleepless in Seattle,” and “You’ve Got Mail.”

I spoke to Carlson about her research process and findings from authoring this book, what she learned about women in Hollywood, Ephron’s impact on the film industry, and more.

W&H: Nora directed her first movie, “This is My Life,” at 50 years old, and the rest is history. How would you describe her impact on the film industry, and rom-coms specifically?

EC: Nora’s gifts as a writer and journalist helped make her as iconic in the romantic comedy genre as her biggest stars and creative collaborators, Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. When Nora directed her own scripts, she was masterful — only she could envision and execute the words and dialogue she wrote and the characters whom she developed. Like any singular artist, she leaves an unmistakable imprint on her work; her sweet and tart voice courses throughout her finest films, which also happened to be her romantic comedies. And she was born to make them.

As the daughter of screenwriter duo Henry and Phoebe Ephron, who raised their four girls in Beverly Hills and specialized in romances, Nora witnessed firsthand the process of writing movies, and bringing them to the big screen. She despised the word “art.” Because she understood that filmmaking was a craft, and with more experience, something at which she could improve. The truth is male directors get more chances than their women counterparts to fail and then score another plum project.

Since her critically acclaimed debut film, “This Is My Life,” did poorly at the box office, TriStar, the studio behind “Sleepless in Seattle,” was initially skeptical about handing this novice the reins of a big-budget romantic comedy — of course, she proved everyone wrong, and that romantic comedy became one of the top-grossing offerings of 1993.

Nora knew that two things contributed to a successful romcom: writing and casting. And hers were wry, knowing, and urbane, yet drenched in the unabashed optimism of the Golden Age classics of her youth. She created strong woman characters who could stand up to the men in their lives, and show them a thing or two. For example, Sally turning the tables on Harry, and acting out a fake orgasm in a deli in “When Harry Met Sally.”

Nora truly believed in the possibility of love between equals, and it was important to her to infuse Sally Albright, Annie Reed, and Kathleen Kelly with a voice — and jokes — as strong as the male lead’s. Why should the guys have all the fun? Nora created worlds in which anything, and everything was possible — worlds that we all still want to live in, and we return to again and again.

W&H: How did you come to land on the three films that you chose to highlight from her career?

EC: “When Harry Met Sally,” “Sleepless in Seattle,” and “You’ve Got Mail” are a trilogy of romantic comedies that represent Nora’s best and most enduring work, and through which her muse, Meg Ryan, played an instrumental part. These movies are her legacy, with “Julie & Julia” runner-up — because Meryl, Stanley Tucci … butter!

Sleepless in Seattle

W&H:You did a great deal of interviews for this book. Which women in her life did you know that you had to talk to and were there any women who did not want to speak to you?

EC: I knew that I absolutely had to speak with Delia Ephron, Nora’s sister and collaborator who worked with her on “Sleepless” and “You’ve Got Mail.” Delia told me she was the “guardian” of the sisters’ scripts, namely that Nora trusted her to protect the integrity of their screenplays during the filmmaking process. Delia had crucial insight into Nora’s vision and working style. I was lucky to interview her.

Meg Ryan, meanwhile, proved a challenge — just when I thought her publicist would connect me for an interview, she went radio silent even though Tom Hanks, her beloved colleague, had spoken with me. At the time, “Star” magazine had done a series of unflattering covers of Meg, and it appeared that she felt burned by the media and potentially even talking to journalists. Who can blame her? However, rather than Meg give me PR-approved soundbites about her own legacy in romantic comedy, it was more fascinating to put together a portrait of her based on my wide-ranging interviews with the folks who could speak openly and honestly about her transformation from ingenue to leading lady in the span of “When Harry Met Sally” to “Sleepless.”

W&H: I loved reading about Nora’s relationships with different men in Hollywood during the course of her career. Can you talk about these relationships, and particularly any sexism in the film industry that she faced during the course of her career?

EC: Nora was married three times. Her first husband was the comedy writer Dan Greenburg, whom she divorced amid the feminist movement that shook things up in the 1970s; her second was Carl Bernstein, who, together with Bob Woodward, linked Watergate to President Nixon. Bernstein left her for another woman while she was pregnant with their second child.

That experience traumatized and humiliated her — but she had the last laugh when she wrote the juicy novel “Heartburn,” a thinly veiled account of the demise of her marriage to Bernstein. That book, of course, became the movie with Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson; Bernstein did not want this movie to get made, though he reportedly loved that Jack, the hottest movie star of his day, was playing a fictional version of Carl.

Several years later, Nora married Nick Pileggi, her third — and best — husband. Pileggi is a “famously nice guy,” as Nora has written, and renowned for his reporting on the Mafia. He wrote the book which inspired Martin Scorsese’s “Goodfellas.” More importantly, he adored Nora and relished in her success, rather than harbor resentment toward it.

But you’re asking me about Nora’s relationships with men in Hollywood! Well, she and “When Harry Met Sally” director Rob Reiner were pretty tight. He trusted her and believed in her talent and gave her the credit of associate producer on his movie; even though he had a hand in co-writing the script for Harry and Sally, Nora received the sole credit as the screenwriter, as well as the only Oscar nomination for anyone involved with the film. That says a lot about Rob. He’s a mensch, with a strong mother.

Rob appreciated Nora and her contributions and what she brought to the character of Sally as well as her keen social observations and killer one-liners. They understood each other as comic writers and as the children of parents who were successful in showbiz. With Nora, Rob saw an equal. It is utterly mystifying to me that he still believes that men and women’t can’t be friends — how, then, could Nora continue to work in Hollywood and be friends with men like Rob, or Mike Nichols, or Tom Hanks? That is the great irony.

When Harry Met Sally

W&H: What did you learn about women’s roles in Hollywood while writing this book?

EC: It’s still a man’s world, with shitty roles for women and a dearth of directing opportunities. Like Nora, if women want to create movies and TV series centered on female characters, then they will need to write and direct material they originate and cultivate themselves.

W&H: Which modern women in Hollywood have been greatly influenced by Nora?

EC: Funny you ask: Since Lena Dunham was mentored by Nora, and is a hugely talented writer-director in her own right, people want to categorize Lena as the new Nora. She’s not. Lena is open and unfiltered where Nora was self-possessed, always aware of the boundaries between people.

If I had to choose a Nora heir, it would have to be Tina Fey. Tina led “Saturday Night Live” for years before “30 Rock,” and the two women share a similar arch, self-deprecating sense of humor and B.S. detector that have won them zillions of female fans. Plus, they set their movies and TV shows in New York, capturing the endless idiosyncrasies of the Greatest City in the World.

Another thing: I know it sounds weird, but Taylor Swift also reminds me of Nora. She just keeps bouncing back from shit, and reinventing herself, and writing about her love life and exes within a narrative in which Taylor always wins as the heroine, never the victim, of her own story. Her own romantic comedy. Harry Styles be damned!

“You’ve Got Mail”

W&H: How far have women come since then and how do you think Nora would feel about where women in Hollywood are today?

EC: Following a summer in which Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman” kicked ass, and Nicole Kidman and Elisabeth Moss cleaned up at the Emmys, it’s easy to feel better about the state of women in Hollywood today. However, we have a long way to go toward creating roles for actresses that are as compelling as those men get to play — and not just love interests, mothers, wives, and daughters.

Nora, a barrier-breaking feminist, loathed panels on women in film. She hated labels and felt trapped by them and wanted to be known as a “director,” not a “woman director.” That said, she would doubtless be heartened by a newly energized feminist movement of women and girls who are taking less shit and taking more names. “Go out and get what you want,” she might tell them. “Just do it.”

“I’ll Have What She’s Having” is available now and can be purchased on Amazon.

https://medium.com/media/b944fd4727ea47477e9028d3530d9c97/href

Author Erin Carlson on Her New Book “I’ll Have What She’s Having” and the Legacy of Nora Ephron was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Liam Neeson Says He’s ‘Unretired’ From Action Movies at the ‘Mark Felt’ Premiere

Liam Neeson Says He’s ‘Unretired’ From Action Movies at the ‘Mark Felt’ Premiere
When looking at today’s seemingly out-of-control politics, it seems like the perfect time for a film about an American political scandal.

On Tuesday, the Writers Guild Theater in Los Angeles became a buzzing hub of activity for the red carpet premiere of the new film, “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House.”

The film stars Liam Neeson as Mark Felt, the whistleblower FBI agent who earned the nickname “Deep Throat” for leaking top secret information to the press about the Watergate scandal in the early 1970s. Felt’s actions proved disastrous for the White House and President Nixon resigned in light of the leaked information.

Neeson, writer and director Peter Landesman, and actors Tony Goldwyn (who plays Ed Miller) and Julian Morris (who plays Bob Woodward) all attended the red carpet. Members of the Felt family and producer Jerry Bruckheimer were among those who also showed support at the premiere.

Mark Felt
See full article at Variety - Film News »

TV News Roundup: Fox’s ‘Rent’ Live Musical Sets 2019 Debut, Sanaa Lathan Joins ‘The Affair’

TV News Roundup: Fox’s ‘Rent’ Live Musical Sets 2019 Debut, Sanaa Lathan Joins ‘The Affair’
In today’s roundup, the live musical production of “Rent” will premiere in 2019, Paramount Network offers a first look at Taylor Kitsch in “Waco,” and Sanaa Lathan joins the cast of Showtime’s “The Affair.”

Premiere Dates

The live musical production of the musical “Rent” will air Sunday, Jan. 27, 2019 on Fox. More details and casting will be announced later. Set in New York City’s East Village, “Rent” tells the story of seven artists struggling to follow their dreams during a time of great social and political turmoil. A re-imagining of Puccini’s “La Boheme,” the Broadway show celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. “Rent” will be executive-produced by Marc Platt (“Grease: Live,” “La La Land,” “Wicked”), Adam Siegel, Julie Larson, Al Larson, and Revolution StudiosVince Totino, Scott Hemming and Marla Levine.

The upcoming HBO documentary “The Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradlee” will debut on Dec. 4. Told
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Liam Neeson is a different kind of hero in “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House”

Ever since Liam Neeson began kicking ass with the Taken franchise, he has been seen as an unusual action hero. A number of genre efforts (plus sequels to Taken) later, and Neeson kicks ass much more these days than anything else. This week, however, Neeson has a vehicle to display his acting range in with Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House. This biopic says it all in the title, as Neeson is getting to play a baity historical figure at a time where this particular story is as prescient as ever. It’s a welcome return to this sort of material for Neeson, who too often isn’t able to show how wonderful of an actor he really is. This film is a biopic of, believe it or not, Mark Felt (Neeson). Felt was an FBI agent who would become better known as Deep Throat, the
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

HBO Sets Premiere Date For Ben Bradlee Doc ‘The Newspaperman’

HBO will debut John Maggio’s doc The Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradlee on Monday, December 4. The film about the legendary Washington Post editor, told primarily in his own words, also includes interviews with Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein, Henry Kissinger and Robert Redford, among many others. HBO describes The Newspaperman as an intimate portrait of Bradlee that traces his ascent from a young Boston boy stricken with polio to one of the most consequential…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Review: Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House (Tiff)

  • JoBlo
Plot: The true story of Mark Felt (Liam Neeson), the FBI’s Associate Director, who, during the Watergate Scandal, fed Bob Woodward information under the handle “Deep Throat.” Review: Deep Throat is the most famous anonymous source ever. For years, people were obsessed with his identity. Everyone knew that, to have access to the info which arguably brought down Richard... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Meet Mark Felt, Steely Savior of Democracy as Deep Throat

  • The Wrap
Mark Felt may be the most consequential unknown American of the last half century. In the shadows until shortly before he died in 2008, Felt was known to the world only as “Deep Throat,” the source whose information led to the downfall of Richard Nixon in the Watergate scandal. Now we get a three dimensional glimpse of the man and his motives in “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House,” starring a steely and principled Liam Neeson in the title role. Obscured in this telling are Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, the two twenty-something Washington Post reporters to.
See full article at The Wrap »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House’

When it was finally told, in the pages of Vanity Fair, in 2005, the story of Mark Felt, the Deputy Associate Director of the FBI, and how he became the legendary Watergate mole Deep Throat was surely one of the most dramatic reveals in American history. Yet since the truth has already been revealed, how much drama is there left to the story? “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House,” written and directed by Peter Landesman (“Parkland”), demonstrates that there’s a lot of drama left to it — enough, in fact, that when the movie is over, it leaves you suspecting that it only wedged a portion of that drama onto the screen. What might, theoretically, have been “All the President’s Men” told from a reverse angle feels more like a prosaically engrossing TV-movie that whets your appetite for a more definitive treatment of the subject.

Of course, you
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Liam Neeson Is Deep Throat in ‘Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House’ Trailer

Sony Pictures Classics has released the first trailer for Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House. Directed by Peter Landesman (Concussion), the film stars Liam Neeson as FBI agent Mark Felt, who would become “Deep Throat”, the anonymous whistleblower who exposed the Watergate scandal in a series of discussions with Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. The film chronicles Felt’s discovery of the Watergate scandal and subsequent decision to leak information to the Post as Richard Nixon’s White House administration began attempting to tamper with the FBI’s investigation. The first thing that’…
See full article at Collider.com »

'Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House' First Trailer

"All your secrets are safe with us." Sony Classics has unveiled the full trailer for a new drama titled Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House, telling the story of the anonymous informant famously known as "Deep Throat". It was revealed in 2005 that special agent Mark Felt was indeed actually "Deep Throat", who helped journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein uncover the Watergate scandal in 1974. The film takes a look at his life and his risks to bring justice to the White House, hence the elaborate title. Liam Neeson stars as Mark Felt, with nice silver hair and all. The full cast includes Diane Lane, Michael C. Hall, Josh Lucas, Tom Sizemore, Bruce Greenwood, Maika Monroe, Brian d'Arcy James, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Ike Barinholtz, Noah Wyle, and Kate Walsh. Take a look below. Trailer for Peter Landesman's Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

‘Mark Felt — The Man Who Brought Down The White House’ Trailer: Liam Neeson Takes On The President

Movie titles are a tricky thing. So far, the film about Mark Felt, the man who anonymously provided critical intel to reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein about the Watergate scandal that helped bring down Richard Nixon has been called “Felt” and “The Silent Man.” But it appears that the folks behind drama are worried about that those titles are too vague, so now they’re running with the overly explicit “Mark Felt — The Man Who Brought Down The White House,” which sounds like lead star Liam Neeson, is going to punch Nixon in the throat before the credits roll.

Continue reading ‘Mark Felt — The Man Who Brought Down The White House’ Trailer: Liam Neeson Takes On The President at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Film News Roundup: Jamie Luner Joins Romantic Comedy ‘Honeymoon in Paradise’ (Exclusive)

Film News Roundup: Jamie Luner Joins Romantic Comedy ‘Honeymoon in Paradise’ (Exclusive)
In today’s film news roundup, “Melrose Place” star Jamie Luner joins “Honeymoon in Paradise,” Vera Farmiga joins “The Front Runner,” Abramorama and Gravitas acquire documentaries and Sony Pictures gets to work on the thriller “Nightlight.”

Castings

Jamie Luner is starring in Odyssey Media’s romantic comedy “Honeymoon in Paradise” with shooting starting in October in the Caribbean island nation of Saint Lucia, Variety has learned exclusively.

The producer is Kirk Shaw, who has producing credits on “Life and Death of John Gotti” and “Papa Hemingway in Cuba.” David DeCoteau is directing from a script by Julia Holdway, in which two exes are contestants on a new romantic reality TV series filming at Saint Lucia’s Coconut Bay Resort and Spa.

The one-time couple soon realize the flame of love continues to burn but find that the only way to get time together, to sort out the past and plan a future, is
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Why Any Movie About Trump Should Make Us Love the Man, Not Hate Him

Why Any Movie About Trump Should Make Us Love the Man, Not Hate Him
In the mid-1970s, William Goldman took on what seemed like an insurmountable challenge: how to turn the richly detailed manuscript of All the President’s Men, which Robert Redford had just optioned from Watergate reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, into a movie.

The celebrated screenwriter had faced other such challenges: transforming the meandering story of two turn-of-the-century bandits into 1969’s Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid; figuring out how to terrify us with a Nazi fugitive on the loose in contemporary Manhattan, in 1974’s Marathon Man. (Will a dental visit ever be the same again?) In each case, he succeeded, winning an Oscar...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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