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2 items from 2005


Rebound

3 August 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Martin Lawrence takes the inevitable Eddie Murphy-Vin Diesel career turn in 20th Century Fox's predictable yet passably entertaining "Rebound". Aimed squarely at young squirts who in the past could only dream of sneaking into one of his raunchier movies, this by-the-playbook kids-sports vehicle presents Lawrence as an outwardly tough guy mellowed by a bunch of 13-year-old kids on the verge of puberty. Business should be merely fair because there is little of the gross-out qualities or edgy adult situations required to attract older teens.

Lawrence's character, Roy McCormick, is no music mogul -- he just acts, dresses and lives like one, with bodyguards, a black Cadillac SUV, expensive suits and shades of a Sean "P. Diddy" Combs or Jay-Z. He's actually an arrogant big-time college basketball coach. At the start of director Steve Carr's ("Daddy Day Care") family comedy, Roy throws one temper tantrum too many and promptly gets banned for life from the league.

Roy and his small-time agent, Tim Fink (Breckin Meyer), face unemployment until kids from Roy's own Mount Vernon Junior High fax him a scribbled request to rescue their pathetic basketball team, coached by teacher Mr. Newirth (Horatio Sanz). Curiously, little is made throughout the screenplay by Jon Lucas and Scott Moore of the star coach being back at his alma mater.

Keith Ellis (Oren Williams) is the leader (read: hotshot) of the inept team of misfits, and he naturally has a hot yet doting single mom, Jeanie Wendy Raquel Robinson), who teaches at the school. Jeanie warns the ethically challenged Roy from the outset that she's keeping her eye on him. Of course, Roy has eyes for no-nonsense Jeanie as well. Parents in the audience can count the cliches while waiting for Roy to develop into Cosby-esque father material.

Practices and games, in which Roy's Smelters are typically outscored as if they were playing an NBA franchise, should be fun for young viewers. These are actually quite brief, as is, for that matter every scene, and thus the entire film. All of this, plus Roy's morality life lessons, makes "Rebound" resemble an extended version of a wholesome television sitcom.

The youngsters' performances are all acceptable but not much more, as the stereotypes they portray pretty much defeat them. There is a boy who is very tall but uncoordinated, one who constantly vomits and one who is a tough girl. The best young thespian is Steven Christopher Parker as the towering nerd Wes.

Other small supporting roles are filled by Megan Mullally as the cynical school principal and Patrick Warburton as a testosterone-filled rival coach. Laura Kightlinger turns up in a cameo.

Lawrence won't disappoint his fans, who no doubt will revel in his brief, second role as Preacher Don, a slick gold-toothed man of the cloth -- purple cloth suit and fedora, that is -- who delivers a barely intelligible "pep talk" while resembling a ghetto pimp.

The soundtrack includes pop tunes ranging from Paul Anka to Outkast. If only "Rebound"'s story had a similar range.

REBOUND

20th Century Fox

A Robert Simonds/Runteldat production

Credits:

Director: Steve Carr

Screenwriters: Jon Lucas & Scott Moore

Story: William Wolff, Ed Decter & John J. Strauss

Producer: Robert Simonds

Executive producers: Martin Lawrence, Tracey Trench, Heidi Santelli, Paul Deason

Director of photography: Glen MacPherson

Production designer: Jaymes Hinkle

Editor: Craig Herring

Music: Teddy Castellucci

Costume designer: Salvador Perez

Cast:

Roy/Preacher Don: Martin Lawrence

Jeanie: Wendy Raquel Robinson

Tim: Breckin Meyer

Mr. Newirth: Horatio Sanz

Keith: Oren Williams

Larry Sr.: Patrick Warburton

Principal Walsh: Megan Mullally

One Love: Eddy Martin

Wes: Steven Christopher Parker

MPAA rating PG

Running time -- 87 minutes »

Permalink | Report a problem


Rebound

2 August 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Martin Lawrence takes the inevitable Eddie Murphy-Vin Diesel career turn in 20th Century Fox's predictable yet passably entertaining "Rebound". Aimed squarely at young squirts who in the past could only dream of sneaking into one of his raunchier movies, this by-the-playbook kids-sports vehicle presents Lawrence as an outwardly tough guy mellowed by a bunch of 13-year-old kids on the verge of puberty. Business should be merely fair because there is little of the gross-out qualities or edgy adult situations required to attract older teens.

Lawrence's character, Roy McCormick, is no music mogul -- he just acts, dresses and lives like one, with bodyguards, a black Cadillac SUV, expensive suits and shades of a Sean "P. Diddy" Combs or Jay-Z. He's actually an arrogant big-time college basketball coach. At the start of director Steve Carr's ("Daddy Day Care") family comedy, Roy throws one temper tantrum too many and promptly gets banned for life from the league.

Roy and his small-time agent, Tim Fink (Breckin Meyer), face unemployment until kids from Roy's own Mount Vernon Junior High fax him a scribbled request to rescue their pathetic basketball team, coached by teacher Mr. Newirth (Horatio Sanz). Curiously, little is made throughout the screenplay by Jon Lucas and Scott Moore of the star coach being back at his alma mater.

Keith Ellis (Oren Williams) is the leader (read: hotshot) of the inept team of misfits, and he naturally has a hot yet doting single mom, Jeanie Wendy Raquel Robinson), who teaches at the school. Jeanie warns the ethically challenged Roy from the outset that she's keeping her eye on him. Of course, Roy has eyes for no-nonsense Jeanie as well. Parents in the audience can count the cliches while waiting for Roy to develop into Cosby-esque father material.

Practices and games, in which Roy's Smelters are typically outscored as if they were playing an NBA franchise, should be fun for young viewers. These are actually quite brief, as is, for that matter every scene, and thus the entire film. All of this, plus Roy's morality life lessons, makes "Rebound" resemble an extended version of a wholesome television sitcom.

The youngsters' performances are all acceptable but not much more, as the stereotypes they portray pretty much defeat them. There is a boy who is very tall but uncoordinated, one who constantly vomits and one who is a tough girl. The best young thespian is Steven Christopher Parker as the towering nerd Wes.

Other small supporting roles are filled by Megan Mullally as the cynical school principal and Patrick Warburton as a testosterone-filled rival coach. Laura Kightlinger turns up in a cameo.

Lawrence won't disappoint his fans, who no doubt will revel in his brief, second role as Preacher Don, a slick gold-toothed man of the cloth -- purple cloth suit and fedora, that is -- who delivers a barely intelligible "pep talk" while resembling a ghetto pimp.

The soundtrack includes pop tunes ranging from Paul Anka to Outkast. If only "Rebound"'s story had a similar range.

REBOUND

20th Century Fox

A Robert Simonds/Runteldat production

Credits:

Director: Steve Carr

Screenwriters: Jon Lucas & Scott Moore

Story: William Wolff, Ed Decter & John J. Strauss

Producer: Robert Simonds

Executive producers: Martin Lawrence, Tracey Trench, Heidi Santelli, Paul Deason

Director of photography: Glen MacPherson

Production designer: Jaymes Hinkle

Editor: Craig Herring

Music: Teddy Castellucci

Costume designer: Salvador Perez

Cast:

Roy/Preacher Don: Martin Lawrence

Jeanie: Wendy Raquel Robinson

Tim: Breckin Meyer

Mr. Newirth: Horatio Sanz

Keith: Oren Williams

Larry Sr.: Patrick Warburton

Principal Walsh: Megan Mullally

One Love: Eddy Martin

Wes: Steven Christopher Parker

MPAA rating PG

Running time -- 87 minutes »

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2 items from 2005


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