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‘Wonder Woman,’ ‘Twin Peaks,’ ‘Baby Driver’ Pick Up CAS Sound Mixing Nominations

‘Wonder Woman,’ ‘Twin Peaks,’ ‘Baby Driver’ Pick Up CAS Sound Mixing Nominations
The Cinema Audio Society has announced nominees for excellence in sound mixing for 2017.

In the live action feature film category, Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” kept a perfect streak alive with its 10th guild or industry group citation. The film was joined by “Baby Driver,” “Dunkirk,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” and “Wonder Woman.”

Animated nominees were “Cars 3,” “Coco,” “Despicable Me 3,” “Fedinand” and “The Lego Batman Movie.”

In documentary, three music-focused films — “Eric Clapton: Life in 12 Bars,” “Gaga: Five Feet Two” and “Long Strange Trip” — were nominated along with “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power” and “Jane.”

On the television side, “Big Little Lies,” “Black Mirror,” “Fargo,” “Sherlock: The Lying Detective” and “Twin Peaks” were nominated for TV movie or miniseries, while series nominees included “Game of Thrones,” “Stranger Things,” “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “Ballers” and “Veep.”

Last year’s Cinema Audio Society winners included “La La Land,” “Finding Dory,” “The
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Here Are This Year's BAFTA Film Award Nominees!

The 2018 BAFTA nominations have been announced, and there are some surprising additions to the list for the British awards, including two nods for the family film Paddington 2! Film Stars Don't Die In Liverpool is also one to watch, with both Annette Bening and Jamie Bell nominated for acting awards. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, which won four awards at the Golden Globes, also picked up a number of nominations, as did other award season front runners like The Shape of Water, Call Me By Your Name, Lady Bird, and Darkest Hour. Winners will be announced on Feb. 21 at London's iconic Royal Albert Hall with new host Joanna Lumley at the helm. Best Actress Annette Bening - Film Stars Don't Die In Liverpool Frances McDormand - Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri Margot Robbie - I, Tonya Sally Hawkins - The Shape of Water Saoirse Ronan - Lady Bird Best Actor
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Lethal Weapon 4: a retrospective

Guy Buckland Dec 14, 2017

Guy takes a belated look at the fourth (but possibly not final) film in the Lethal Weapon franchise…

Spoilers lie ahead for Lethal Weapons 2 to 4.

See related The Oa: 10 questions (sort of) answered The Oa: Netflix renews for season 2 Netflix's The Oa: spoiler-free review

At the beginning of 2016, Den of Geek gave me the opportunity to rank the Lethal Weapon films in order of merit and then write about each one individually. This made me very happy, as it is a franchise for which I have a great deal of passion – both positive and negative. But like a reluctant hit man stuck in a clichéd redemption arc, I just couldn’t finish the job.

By the time I had produced a well-reasoned account of why the third in the series was objectively the worst – an assertion I still stand by, despite what you’re about to read
See full article at Den of Geek »

Examining Hollywood remakes: The Mask of Zorro

  • Cinelinx
It’s time to talk about remakes again. In this installment of our series, we’re going to be looking at a revamped version of one of the most legendary fictional heroes ever. This week, Cinelinx looks at The Mask of Zorro (1998).

The Zorro character was introduced in the 1919 serialized story, “The Curse of Capistrano”, written by Johnston McCulley, and was published in All-Stories Weekly, the same magazine that first published Edgar Rice Burroughs’ “Tarzan of the Apes” and “John Carter: Warlord of Mars”. Zorro was partly the inspiration for Batman. (Parenthetically, in DC comics, Bruce Wayne and his parents were coming out of a theater after seeing a film version of Zorro when his parents were killed.)

The story has been adapted several times. The first time was a silent film version in 1920, starring the cinema’s first-ever action star Douglas Fairbanks as the title character. However, we
See full article at Cinelinx »

DVD Review: "The Prisoner Of Zenda" (1979) Starring Peter Sellers And Elke Sommer; Universal Vault DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Although he was regarded as a comedy genius, the sad truth is that Peter Sellers was more often than not misused in big screen comedies. After making it big on British TV  and in feature films in the late 1950s, Sellers became an international sensation with his acclaimed work in big studio feature films such as "Lolita", "Dr. Strangelove", "The World of Henry Orient" and the first entries in the "Pink Panther" series. Through the mid-Sixties, he did impressive work in films like "After the Fox", "The Wrong Box" and "What's New Pussycat?" If the films weren't classics, at least they presented some of Sellers' off-the-wall ability to deliver innovative characters and comedic situations. By the late Sixties, however, his own personal demons began to get the better of him. Sellers was the epitome of the classic clown: laughing on the outside but crying on the inside.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Crossbones Review: “The Covenant” (Season 1, Episode 2)

The second episode of NBC’s Crossbones, “The Covenant,” begins with a rather out-of-the-blue revelation: James Balfour (Peter Stebbings), Blackbeard’s (John Malkovich) wheelchair-bound inventor friend, has actually succeeded in repairing the shiny, golden longitude chronometer that Tom Lowe (Richard Coyle) took such care to destroy at the beginning of the series. How he got it fixed so quickly is beyond me. Anyhow, he has done so, and Blackbeard at last has the weapon that Lowe was so desperate to keep from him.

Soon, however, Blackbeard is faced with another obstacle: a crew of men led by Sam Valentine (Stuart Wilson), an old acquaintance of Blackbeard. The Commodore wants Sam to take the chronometer and sell it to the British forces, led by William Jagger (Julian Sands) in Jamaica. The payment that the Commodore wants: two hell-burners (powerful battleships). Sam has a rather adverse reaction to Blackbeard’s offer, feeling
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Jason Lee has a Second Sight

CBS' drama pilot Second Sight drama adds Jason Lee to pilot Jason Lee, or better known these days as Dave in the Alvin and the Chipmunks flicks, has landed the lead in CBS's Second Sight pilot from Carol Mendelsohn and Michael Cuesta, reports Deadline. The show's based on the British series and is a psychological thriller which has Lee as Tanner, a New Orleans lead detective with ocular disorder which leads him to have horrifying hallucinations. With the doctor reassuring him he won't lose his sight, Tanner takes the disorder as side effects of a gift. Clive Owen starred in the original series of 1999 created by Charles Beeson. That cast also includes Claire Skinner and Stuart Wilson.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Jason Lee has a Second Sight

CBS' drama pilot Second Sight drama adds Jason Lee to pilot Jason Lee, or better known these days as Dave in the Alvin and the Chipmunks flicks, has landed the lead in CBS's Second Sight pilot from Carol Mendelsohn and Michael Cuesta, reports Deadline. The show's based on the British series and is a psychological thriller which has Lee as Tanner, a New Orleans lead detective with ocular disorder which leads him to have horrifying hallucinations. With the doctor reassuring him he won't lose his sight, Tanner takes the disorder as side effects of a gift. Clive Owen starred in the original series of 1999 created by Charles Beeson. That cast also includes Claire Skinner and Stuart Wilson.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Great Scott: Tony’s Top Ten Tribute

Today’s sad news of the death of legendary director Tony Scott has come as a shock for most of us. Though overshadowed by his older brother Ridley’s groundbreaking work, such as Alien and Blade Runner, Tony was always the more consistent director, and one with a stunning visual style all of his own. His paced edits and zooms have been copied by many a filmmaker, but never surpassed. He began his Hollywood career with brooding vampire thriller The Hunger, and was also famous for his commercials and television hits, as well as forming production company Scott Free with his sibling.

Coming from the same small North East of England town both Tony and Ridley were born, our area has always been extremely proud of what the brothers have achieved during their respective careers. I think it’s only fitting to look back at Tony Scott’s terrific output.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Thoughts on... Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III (1993)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III, 1993.

Directed by Stuart Gillard.

Starring Mark Caso, Brian Tochi, Jim Raposa, Corey Feldman, Matt Hill, Tim Kelleher, Robbie Rist, David Fraser, Stuart Wilson and Elias Koteas.

Synopsis:

The teenage mutant ninja turtles travel back in time to ancient Japan and embark on an adventure.

I owned Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990) on VHS, and so I had quite a strong nostalgic attachment to the movie when I recently revisited it. I was absolutely delighted that the movie was still entertaining and packed enough charm to transport me back to my childhood. It was with eagerness that I ploughed into the sequel Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze (1991), a film which I also owned on VHS. I had vague memories of preferring this sequel over the original, but when re-watching I was struck by how average the movie is. Much to my dismay as a child,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Understanding Scorsese: A Martin Scorsese Profile (Part 3)

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary American filmmaker Martin Scorsese in the third of a five part feature... read parts one and two.

When he was approached by Paul Newman (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid), who wanted to revise his signature role of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1961), Martin Scorsese was skeptical about the project. “I had a lot of reservations about it,” admitted the filmmaker of the planned cinematic adaptation of The Color of Money (1986) by novelist Walter Tevis. “I felt it was a literal sequel. There were even a few minutes of film inserted in it from the first picture. It had its own merits, but it certainly wasn’t the kind of thing I wanted to do.” A meeting was held in New York between the acting legend and the director where the decision was made to keep the name of the book but
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

A Seriously Random List | The Prisons of the Future

  • Pajiba
There are a lot of pretty outstanding prison movies out there. The number one movie on IMDb right now is The Shawshank Redemption. But my favorite part of many movies, usually sci-fi or B-horror, is when you get a glimpse at the prison systems of the future. In most cases, either prisons have gotten so out of control that they've been turned over to corporations, or they've literally blocked off vast tracts of land and let the prisoners run feral, creating primitive feudal colonies of their own. I'm always interested in dystopian futures, and it's interesting that most science fictions envisions our flawed penitentiaries eventually will break down.

Here are ten of my favorite future visions of how prisoners will be penalized. Honorable mention goes to A Clockwork Orange, which isn't really a prison movie, but does involve Alex breaking down and being reconditioned in a mental facility. Also not listed is SuperJail!
See full article at Pajiba »

Looking back at Lethal Weapon 3

Writer Shane Black was sadly absent for Lethal Weapon 3, and some see it as the worst in the series. Mark, meanwhile, thinks it deserves a second look…

Writer Shane Black’s absence provides this third film in the franchise with a major headache. Widely recognised as the worst of the four movies (although, to be fair, some would say that of the fourth), Lethal Weapon 3 suffers from an over-reliance on comedy, rather than letting the action take the brunt of the plot, and I can’t help but feel that’s down to Black’s lack of involvement in the story.

He might be credited as a writer for the characters, but the plot is all down to Jeffrey Boam and Robert Mark Kamen, and while each has form (The Lost Boys, Transporter to name but two of their past output). it doesn’t shine through here.

Focusing
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 12 best pure Hollywood action movies of the 1990s

There’s plenty of guns, violence and one-liners, as we count down the best 12 Hollywood action movies of the 1990s…

What is an action film? That's been the tricky question that we've had to unconvincingly answer before putting this list of titles together.

Personally, I'm a massive fan of the Harrison Ford movie Clear And Present Danger, but have held off including it here because the action moments are few and far between (there's one really good sequence, but not too much else action-wise). And to be fair, one or two of the movies that have made the cut here could have a similar argument at least wafted in their direction. It's not been an easy list to compile.

But the 12 I've picked here - and I've kept it to Hollywood blockbuster flicks - are action movies at heart, even if the accelerator is relaxed for periods within the films chosen.
See full article at Den of Geek »

See also

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