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1-20 of 46 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


Film Feature: The Best Lead Performances of 2011

15 December 2011 8:39 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Yesterday, we brought you some of the most engaging and memorable supporting performances of 2011. As much as I love some of the acting work in that feature, it’s nothing compared to the talent on display below. The fact is that the Best Actor and Best Actress categories this year are arguably more crowded than ever, with an amazing number of performances that will be remembered for years to come. My runner-ups, in both categories, could have easily beaten most other years’ top five lead nominees. It actually pains me to list some of them outside this year’s top five, but we’ve had an embarrassment of riches in 2011. What an amazing year for acting.

The Best Actor Performances of 2011

There is a staggering level of variety and depth on display in this list of performances from some of the best working actors today. I loved the sheer »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Mark Kermode's DVD round-up

29 October 2011 4:07 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Princess of Montpensier; The Tree of Life; The Way; X-Men: First Class; Everything Must Go

It would be easy to dismiss The Princess of Montpensier (2010, Studiocanal, 15) as little more than a handsomely appointed costume drama, with its period setting, romping horses, masked balls, dashing duels and lush scenic detours through leafy woods and remote castles. Yet 70-year-old director Bertrand Tavernier's vibrant adaptation of Madame de La Fayette's 1662 romance is a deceptively seductive affair which discreetly addresses issues of class, gender, religion and honour with wit, verve and ease.

Mélanie Thierry is Marie de Mézières, the eponymous heroine with an undying passion for the earthy Duc de Guise (Gaspard Ulliel), who finds herself bartered into a marriage of convenience with the woefully reliable Prince de Montpensier (Grégoire Leprince-Ringuet). While her unloved husband is away fighting the Huguenots for Charles IX, it falls to Lambert Wilson's tortured Comte »

- Mark Kermode

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New this Week: ‘The Big Year,’ ‘The Thing’ and ‘The Tree of Life (DVD)’

12 October 2011 6:00 AM, PDT | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

Hitting movie theaters this weekend:

The Big YearOwen WilsonJack BlackSteve Martin

FootlooseKenny WormaldJulianne HoughDennis Quaid

The Thing - Mary Elizabeth WinsteadJoel EdgertonUlrich Thomsen

Movie of the Week

The Big Year

The Stars: Owen WilsonJack BlackSteve Martin

The Plot: Three avid bird watchers compete to spot the rarest birds in North America at a prestigious annual event.

The Buzz: I was completely unaware of this film until about two weeks ago, when I first saw the trailer. Seems it snuck up on everyone, as there hasn’t been much buzz about it at all. Owen Wilson, Jack Black and Steve Martin are all, of course, potential of amazing comedy cinema, and it’ll be interest to see how the three play off of each other. If the script is good, these three guys will do it justice. I’m »

- Aaron Ruffcorn

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Fantasy Casting: If They Made Star Wars Today…

7 September 2011 3:05 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Iconic is an overused term, but few things really merit its use like the original Star Wars of 1977. And when you think of those enduring pop culture images they are indelibly wedded to the actors who played the parts: Luke Skywalker looking wistfully at that binary sunset on Tatooine, with John Williams‘ stirring music behind it, is forever linked to Mark Hamill in our collective imagination. For many Harrison Ford Is Han Solo, whilst everybody would be freaked out if Darth Vader spoke with any voice other than that of James Earl Jones.

But what if the film were made today with different actors?

With the Star Wars Blu-ray finally hitting stores next week and another hypothetical exercise in the spirit of Alex Lawson’s interesting take on re-casting Sidney Lumet’s Dog Day Afternoon, I’m looking at re-casting all the main parts with today’s actors. But whereas »

- Robert Beames

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The Princess of Montpensier – review

9 July 2011 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Bertrand Tavernier has always been one of French cinema's consummate storytellers and he's at his most elegant and engaged in The Princess of Montpensier, a tale of lust and deceit set during the 16th-century French wars of religion. The film is based on a novella by Madame de La Fayette, the 17th-century writer best known for the classic and often-adapted La princesse de Clèves, a novel which was thrust into the public eye in France recently when President Sarkozy revealed his distaste for it and unwittingly inspired an increase in the book's sales. Tavernier's adaptation might do the same for this lesser known work as it clips along with splendid locations and well-observed costumes and customs, displaying a sensibility and wit that never feel stuffy.

The story is of a beautiful young heiress (Mélanie Thierry) who is forced to marry the Prince de Montpensier despite being in love with the »

- Jason Solomons

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This week's new films

8 July 2011 4:07 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Tree Of Life (12A)

(Terrence Malick, 2011, Us) Brad Pitt, Jessica Chastain, Hunter McCracken, Laramie Eppler, Sean Penn, Tye Sheridan. 139 mins

Successor to Kubrick's 2001 or extended perfume ad? Either way, Malick's macro/microcosmic take on life, the universe and family life makes most films look unadventurous. Beyond the head-trip "creation of the universe" sequences, it's largely Sean Penn's impressionistic reminiscence of his conflicted childhood, rendered in gorgeous imagery, with introspective voiceovers and a dreamy intensity.

The Princess Of Montpensier (15)

(Bertrand Tavernier, 2010, Fra) Mélanie Thierry, Gaspard Ulliel, Lambert Wilson. 140 mins

There's costumes and courtliness, but this 16th-century saga remains unstuffy. Sought-after Thierry's quest for self-determination is the focus, and the treatment is modern and immediate.

Trust (15)

(David Schwimmer, 2010, Us) Liana Liberato, Clive Owen, Catherine Keener. 106 mins

Those who saw Catfish will know where this teen's online relationship with an apparently nice boy is headed. But what follows is an exercise in parent-worrying technophobia. »

- Steve Rose

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The Princess of Montpensier – review

7 July 2011 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Period costume drama from veteran French director Bertrand Tavernier that is elegant but too long for its own good

This new film from the 70-year-old Bertrand Tavernier is a handsomely mounted period costume drama based on the 1662 romance by Madame de la Fayette. It gallops along as elegantly and confidently as the horsemen we see in the opening scene – part bodice-ripper, part patrician soap opera, and part romantic tragedy – albeit a romantic tragedy of no very great resonance or depth. In the middle of France's religious wars of the 16th century, the sublime beauty of a spirited and intelligent young woman, Marie de Mézières (Mélanie Thierry) enslaves the hearts of many warrior-noblemen who are, in Shakespeare's phrase, sudden and quick in quarrel. She is in love with her tempestuous cousin Guise (Gaspard Ulliel) but married off to the young Prince Montpensier (Gregoire Leprince-Ringuet), and also, while he is away at the wars, »

- Peter Bradshaw

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New this Week: ‘Horrible Bosses,’ ‘Zookeeper’ and ‘Hobo with a Shotgun (DVD)’

6 July 2011 6:21 AM, PDT | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

Hitting movie theaters this weekend:

Horrible BossesJason BatemanCharlie DayJason Sudeikis

ZookeeperKevin JamesRosario DawsonLeslie Bibb

Movie of the Week

Horrible Bosses

The Stars: Jason BatemanCharlie DayJason Sudeikis

The Plot: Three friends conspire to murder their awful bosses when they realize they are standing in the way of their happiness.

The Buzz: I can’t say that I’m terribly excited about this film — I’d rather go see Super 8 (again) or Transformers 3 (again). Still, anything’s better than Zookeeper. Bateman is great, and the actors populating these horrible bosses are all battle-tested in the realm of good comedy (Jennifer Aniston = Office Space, Colin Farrell = In Bruges, Kevin Spacey = Hurlyburly). When he’s on, Seth Gordon is a phenomenal director (see The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters), so this should be at least good. The trailer was pretty unimpressive though »

- Aaron Ruffcorn

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2011 Midway Point: Ryan's Top 10

5 July 2011 1:00 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

#10. Of Gods and Men - Xavier Beauvois (February 25th) Select sequences are almost worthy of comparison to Bresson, including head monk Lambert Wilson's conflicted hike into nature, or the monks' final, close-up filled suppertime farewell. The film needed a more ruthless editor, however -- many scenes come across as mundane and unnecessary. Could easily be an hour shorter, and better for it. #9. Le Quattro Volte - Michelangelo Frammartino (March 30th) A film that proves that the protagonist of a film need not be a human being, or even be animate. At times, however, its resistance to traditional storytelling fells more like a cop-out than a radicalism. The possibility of an inanimate object being a fully realized character is never fully explored. Still, an absorbing and unusual two hours in the movie theatre. #8. The Sleeping Beauty - Catherine Breillat (Rendez-Vous with French Cinema (Fslc) Perverse, bizarre, sexy, funny, provocative. In other words, »

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Win: Bundle of French Cinema Classic DVDs With The Princess Of Montpensier

1 July 2011 12:14 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

French historical epic The Princess Of Montpensier comes to cinemas on 8th July, directed by Bertrand Tavernier and starring Mélanie Thierry, Lambert Wilson. To mark its release we have a superb collection of French cinema classics on DVD, including Coco Before Chanel, Gainsbourg, Breathless, Belle Du Jour, The Concert and Paris, to give away!

1562. In France, during the reign of Charles IX, the wars of religion are raging… Marie de Mézières, heiress to one of the kingdom’s greatest fortunes, loves the young Duc de Guise, known in the annals of history as Le Balafré, “Scarface”. She believes he loves her back. To increase his family’s prestige, her father, the Marquis de Mézières forces Marie to marry the Prince de Montpensier, whom she has never met. The Prince is summoned by Charles IX to join the war against the Protestants. With the whole country turned into a bloody battlefield, »

- Matt Holmes

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Win A Bunch of French DVDs with The Princess of Montpensier

25 June 2011 7:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

French historical epic The Princess Of Montpensier comes to cinemas on 8th July, directed by Bertrand Tavernier and starring Mélanie Thierry, Lambert Wilson. To mark its release we have a superb collection of French cinema classics on DVD, including Coco Before Chanel, Gainsbourg, Breathless, Belle Du Jour, The Concert and Paris, to give away!

1562. In France, during the reign of Charles IX, the wars of religion are raging… Marie de Mézières, heiress to one of the kingdom’s greatest fortunes, loves the young Duc de Guise, known in the annals of history as Le Balafré, “Scarface”. She believes he loves her back. To increase his family’s prestige, her father, the Marquis de Mézières forces Marie to marry the Prince de Montpensier, whom she has never met. The Prince is summoned by Charles IX to join the war against the Protestants. With the whole country turned into a bloody battlefield, »

- Competitons

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DVD Playhouse--June 2011

10 June 2011 10:53 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

DVD Playhouse June 2011

By

Allen Gardner

Kiss Me Deadly (Criterion) Robert Aldrich’s 1955 reinvention of the film noir detective story is one of cinema’s great genre mash-ups: part hardboiled noir; part cold war paranoid thriller; and part science- fiction. Ralph Meeker plays Mickey Spillane’s fascist detective Mike Hammer as a narcissistic simian thug, a sadist who would rather smash a suspect’s fingers than make love to the bevvy of beautiful dames that cross his path. In fact, the only time you see a smile cross Meeker’s sneering mug is when he’s doling out pain, with a vengeance. When a terrified young woman (Cloris Leachman, film debut) literally crossed Hammer’s path one night, and later turns up dead, he vows to get to the bottom of her brutal demise. One of the most influential films ever made, and perhaps the most-cited film by the architects »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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First Look: ‘Ernest and Celestine,’ the New Film From the Directors of ‘A Town Called Panic’ [Updated With Video]

9 June 2011 7:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Just today I was recommending the incomparably wonderful animated film A Town Called Panic to a friend, which it occurred to me to wonder: what progress has been made on the project the makers of that film (Stéphane Aubier and Vincent Patar) are cooking up now? They're making a new film, Ernest and Celestine (co-directed by Benjamin Renner), and as it turns out there is actually a current article about it in Variety, based on the fact that yesterday saw the debut of footage at the Annecy festival [1] in France. So that crop above is probably your first look at Ernest and Celestine, which adapts the book series by Gabrielle Vincent. The full image is below, along with some more news on the film.  It looks like quite a change of pace from A Town Called Panic... Variety [2] announces that Lambert Wilson (The Matrix Reloaded, Of Gods and Men) will voice Ernest, »

- Russ Fischer

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Xavier Palud to Helm Blind Man for EuropaCorp

31 May 2011 12:27 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

America has long held a fascination with serial killers, and now it looks like France is taking a turn with Blind Man, which Xavier Palud (Ils [Them], The Eye) is set to direct for Luc Besson's EuropaCorp, which also holds French distribution and international sales rights.

According to Variety Palud (pictured right) will be directing Lambert Wilson (Sahara, Of Gods and Men) and Jacques Gamblin (The First Day of the Rest of Your Life, Safe Conduct), both of whom are attached to star in the film, which was scripted by writer-director Eric Besnard (Ca$h) from an original idea by Besson.

Palud's third feature, which goes into production in early September in Paris, has Gamblin as a solitary cop investigating a cold case. He suspects that a blind man (Wilson) is the killer, sparking a battle of wits.

We're not sure if this one is more thriller or horror, but »

- Uncle Creepy

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Is 'The Blind Man' a Serial Killer?

31 May 2011 10:55 AM, PDT | bloody-disgusting.com | See recent Bloody-Disgusting.com news »

While some serial killer thrillers end up like Se7en, others become Blitz; this is why it's so incredibly difficult to decide whether or not to cover each announced serial killer flick. Worse comes to worse we can always abandon coverage, like we did with Lionsgate UK's Blitz, which ended up an action thriller instead of something darker (as promised). Lambert Wilson and Jacques Gamblin are attached to star in EuropaCorp thriller The Blind Man, with The Eye/Them director Xavier Palud at the helm. Scripted by writer-director Eric Besnard (Ca$h) from an original idea by Luc Besson, Man is a cat-and-mouse serial killer thriller that goes into production early September in Paris. Palud's third feature has "Gamblin as a solitary cop investigating a cold case. He suspects that a blind man (Wilson) is the killer, sparking a battle of wits." »

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Them Director to Follow Blind Man

31 May 2011 | shocktillyoudrop.com | See recent shocktillyoudrop news »

Xavier Palud, one of the director's behind Them and 2008's The Eye remake, has signed up to direct Blind Man . The film is described as a serial killer thriller; Luc Besson concocted the idea and Eric Besnard penned the script. Lambert Wilson and Jacques Gamblin will star. The latter is a cop who suspects a blind man is a killer. »

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New Release: Of Gods and Men Blu-ray and DVD

10 May 2011 12:14 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

The acclaimed award-winning drama Of Gods and Men, a heavy duty film about the power of faith, will be released as a Blu-ray/DVD combo pack on July 5 by Sony Pictures Home Entertainment.

A French Christian monk runs on faith in Of Gods and Men.

Loosely based on the life of the Cistercian monks of Tibhirine in Algeria, the movie revolves around eight French Christian monks living in harmony with their Muslim brothers in a monastery perched in the mountains of North Africa in the 1990s. When a crew of foreign workers is massacred by an Islamic fundamentalist group, fear sweeps through the region. The army offers them protection, but the monks refuse. Should they stay or should they go….?

Directed and co-written by French filmmaker Xavier Beauvois, the movie stars Lambert Wilson (The Matrix Revolutions, The Matrix Reloaded) and Michael Lonsdale (Munich), among others.

Acclaimed by critics and audiences around the world, »

- Laurence

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The Princess Of Montpensier – The Review

5 May 2011 9:47 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Since the news was all a buzz last week with details of the big royal wedding in London, let’s take a look at this film about a wedding amongst the near royals in France a few hundred years ago. Oh, and the French royalty does figure into the story eventually. Director Bertran Tavernier has directed a motion picture based inspired by the short story by Madame de La Fayette, The Princess Of Montpensier.

This period romance is set near the end of the 16th century Wars of Religions between Catholics and Protestants. The Count de Chabannes has left the military service after having killed a peasant woman during a bloody skirmish at a farm. Soon the Count is rescued from Highwaymen by a former pupil, the Prince de Montpensier. They travel to the Prince’s castle where his father has arranged a marriage between him and Marie de Mezieres »

- Jim Batts

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Weekend Preview: Indie & Foreign Films to See: Princess of Montpensier, Screaming Man, Armadillo

15 April 2011 11:20 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Here's Toh's weekend preview of the mainstream box office contenders. And for the smart-movie demo, here's a look at the weekend's new indie and foreign language offerings, from Bertrand Tavernier's The Princess of Montpensier (gorgeous, as pictured) and Danish war documentaryArmadillo, to Italy's Oscar submission The First Beautiful Thing and the France/Belgium/Chad co-production A Screaming Man, which indieWIRE's Eric Kohn calls Divine. Less well-embraced are Robert Redford's The Conspirator (Caryn James defends it here), despite its fine cast, and a widely excoriated adaptation of Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. Details, trailers, images and reviews are below: The Princess of Montpensier, IFC (France) Dir: Bertrand Tavernier; Cast: Melanie Thierry, Lambert Wilson, Grégoire Leprince-Ringuet, Gaspard Ulliel | 76% Metacritic | 82% Tomatometer | B indieWIRE, plus Gaspard Ulliel »

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Gaspard Ulliel: The Hollywood Interview

15 April 2011 10:23 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

(Gaspard Ulliel, above. Photo by Nora Schaefer.)

By Terry Keefe

While playing a French historical character with the nickname of “le Balafré,” or “the Scarred,” in the new film The Princess of Montpensier, actor Gaspard Ulliel also risked his own famous features, while shooting some of the film’s highly realistic fight scenes. Although Ulliel does, in fact, sport a small scar on his left cheek from an accident with a dog when he was a child, the marks carried by his young warrior character in the film, the Duc de Guise, are considerably more pronounced, which isn’t surprising when you see Ulliel as the Duc in the heated battle scenes of Princess. Directed by legendary filmmaker Bertrand Tavernier (interviewed by Alex Simon for our site here), The Princess of Montpensier takes place during the French Wars of Religion of the 1500s, and the director opted not to use many stuntmen, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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1-20 of 46 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


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