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Johnny Depp is guest of honour at this year’s Cineramageddon at Glasonbury

Johnny Depp is heading to Glastonbury. We’ve just received word that the legendary Hollywood actor is heading to Britain’s most famous farm for Cineramageddon, a unique five day film festival within Glastonbury Festival, conceived and curated by director Julien Temple. More on the Johnny Depp Glastonbury news below.

Johnny Depp Glastonbury news: Actor will attend the 2017 festival Johnny Depp Glastonbury news: The legendary Hollywood star will appear at the 2017 music festival

The first event of its kind will screen must-see movies in state-of-the-art projection onto the biggest cinema screen in Britain. The nocturnal audience will be seated in a post-apocalyptic drive-in auditorium courtesy of artist Joe Rush, featuring seventy mutated vintage British and American cars, repurposed funfair rides and a Lear jet.

Related: Pirates Of The Caribbean: Salazar’s Revenge review

“Guest of Honour” Johnny Depp will introduce his personal choice of films that will be screening through
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Johnny Depp to present his favourite movies at Glastonbury

  • ScreenDaily
Johnny Depp to present his favourite movies at Glastonbury
Exclusive: Depp to be first guest of honour at Julien Temple’s Cineramageddon event next week.

Johnny Depp will be the inaugural guest of honour at Glastonbury’s new film event Cineramageddon next week.

Depp will introduce three of his favourite movies (two of which he also starred in) at the music festival: Withnail & I, Dead Man and The Libertine.

Five day film event Cineramageddon is the brainchild of director Julien Temple and is designed by artist Joe Rush. It is presented by film producer Stephen Malit, with technical supervision by Michael Denner.

Movies will be projected onto the biggest cinema screen in the UK with the nocturnal audience seated in seventy mutated vintage British and American cars, repurposed funfair rides and a Lear jet.

Depp’s selected movies will screen consecutively on Thursday 22 June with the actor introducing them in conversation with Temple.

“No film has ever made me laugh more”

The Pirates of The Caribbean
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Theatre Review: The Libertine (West End)

The Libertine review: Dominic Cooper commands in this solid re-staging of Stephen Jeffreys’ modern classic.

The Libertine review by Paul Heath, September 2016.

Jasper Britton and Dominic Cooper in The Libertine. Photo: Alastair Muir

Dominic Cooper headlines the latest interpretation of British playwright Stephen JeffreysThe Libertine, the story of John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester, a notorious rake and libertine poet in the court of King Charles II of England.

Cooper addresses the audience with the commanding line ‘You will not like me.’, in the play’s opening moment, a statement referring his deplorable hellraiser rather than this lavish revival of perhaps one of the modern day’s greatest theatrical works. We liked ‘him’, and ‘it’ a lot.

Dominic Cooper in The Libertine. Photo: Alastair Muir

‘The gentlemen will be envious and the women will be repelled.’

Jeffreys’ delicious, hedonistic and rather explicit story charts Wilmot’s journey from royal
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Johnny Depp Joins Another Movie Called ‘The Libertine’, This Time for Director Brett Ratner

Johnny Depp Joins Another Movie Called ‘The Libertine’, This Time for Director Brett Ratner
Unless you’re one of those hardcore Johnny Depp fans, there’s a good chance that you’ve forgotten, or possibly never knew, that the Pirates of the Caribbean starred in a movie called The Libertine. The period drama about 17th century poet John Wilmot (aka the Earl of Rochester) was given a limited release in November of […]

The post Johnny Depp Joins Another Movie Called ‘The Libertine’, This Time for Director Brett Ratner appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Plunkett & Macleane holds up history by trying to be Trainspotting

This swaggering tale of 18th-century highwaymen is retold as a sweary modern crime drama

Director: Jake Scott

Entertainment grade: C–

History grade: D

James Maclaine (the accepted spelling) found fame as the "Gentleman Highwayman" in mid-18th-century London. He blamed the violent element of his crimes on his accomplice, William Plunket.

Crime

The film opens with Macleane (Jonny Lee Miller) languishing in a debtor's jail in Knightsbridge. He is accidentally freed by Plunkett (Robert Carlyle) in the course of a far-fetched robbery. Both men end up in prison at Newgate, and must buy their way out with a ruby Plunkett has thoughtfully swallowed. The real James Maclaine was an Irishman of respectable family, though he himself managed only a patchy career as a grocer in London's Welbeck Street. When he lost what little remained of his money at the gaming tables during a masquerade, he and apothecary William Plunket donned
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Johnny Depp to produce and maybe star in Dr. Seuss biopic

Johnny Depp has a thing about playing world renowned writers. Whether they be Hunter S. Thompson, John Wilmot, or in my personal favorite Depp film, Finding Neverland where he played J.M. Barrie. But he may be about to add probably the most beloved writer in American history, Dr. Seuss. Illumination Entertainment, currently hard at work on an animated adaptation of Dr. Seuss' The Lorax, is
See full article at Punch Drunk Critics »

Johnny Depp is Dr Seuss!

Johnny Depp loves biopics, especially those that allow him to play authors (Hunter S. Thompson twice in Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas, The Rum Diary… but also Peter Pan author J.M. Barrie in Finding Neverland and John Wilmot in The Libertine… plus he played a fictional writer in Secret Window) and The Hollywood Reporter revealed yesterday he is looking to play another famous writer on the big screen.

It’s said Depp is trying to push through a biopic of Dr. Seuss, the legendary children’s author whose little known real name was Theodor Geisel. His works The Cat in the Hat, The Lorax, How The Grinch Stole Christmas and Horton Hears A Who are staple childhood books for youngsters learning to read and have sold over 200 million copies worldwide. With Hollywood having bled dry all the tales above with flicks to mixed degrees of sucess (in regards to The Lorax,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Johnny Depp To Produce & Possibly Star In Biopic About Dr. Seuss (aka Theodor Geisel)

Billy Ray Is Now The Third Writer Hired For 'The Thin Man' Well, why not? With a penchant for playing writers on film, Johnny Depp has already portrayed Hunter S. Thompson, J.M. Barrie and John Wilmot on the big screen (and played a novelist in "Secret Window"), and it looks like he may be adding another famous figure to list. THR reports that Depp's Infinitum Nihil shingle is teaming up with Illumination Entertainment for a biopic on none other than one of the biggest children's writers of all time, Dr. Seuss (or as the IRS knows him as, Theodor Geisel).…
See full article at The Playlist »

The Presence and Whispering Evil into Mortals' Ears: A Movie Review

*full disclosure: a screener of this film was provided by Lionsgate.

Director/writer: Tom Provost.

Tagline: "Don't believe everything your hear."

Lionsgate is distributing Tom Provost's The Presence on DVD today and appropriately, here is a review on this, sometimes romantic, thriller.The Presence stars Mira Sovino as "The Woman." She vacations to a nearby cabin to deal with some emotional pain. Here, there is only more suffering with a duo of ghosts tormenting her at various points in the film. "The Man" is played by Justin Kirk in a somewhat awkward style. Other film messages might also seem awkward. The film is really centered on some elements of Christian mythos including temptation to sin, the Devil and reaching a higher power through good deeds. Other viewers might find something different in theme, but this was the central message seen by this reviewer.

One could also say that the
See full article at 28 Days Later Analysis »

The Libertine loses by a nose

This nasally-obsessed account of the 17th-century's rudest royal poet is lacking in humour as well as historical accuracy

Director: Laurence Dunmore

Entertainment grade: D

History grade: D

John Wilmot, second Earl of Rochester, was a libertine at the court of Charles II. He is remembered as the author of some of the rudest poetry on English literature reading lists.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Libertine loses by a nose

This nasally-obsessed account of the 17th-century's rudest royal poet is lacking in humour as well as historical accuracy

Director: Laurence Dunmore

Entertainment grade: D

History grade: D

John Wilmot, second Earl of Rochester, was a libertine at the court of Charles II. He is remembered as the author of some of the rudest poetry on English literature reading lists.

Politics

It's 1675, and Rochester (Johnny Depp) has been banished from court for writing a rude poem about the king. This is true, though it actually happened a year or two earlier. But the reign is in crisis. Charles II (John Malkovich, with amusing fake nose) calls Rochester back. "I want you to take on a new role," he tells him. "People listen to you, Johnny. If you take your seat in the Lords, you could make great speeches which would influence events." The king commissions a play. Rochester produces the obscene Signior Dildo,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Take Three: Rosamund Pike

Craig here. It's Sunday. It's Take Three time.

Today: Rosamund Pike

Take One: An(ti) Education?

Earlier this year two great 1960s booze-soaked lushes missed out on Supporting Actress Oscar nods: Julianne Moore's Charley in A Single Man and Pike's Helen in An Education (2009). I'd personally have slotted both in the running had I sole ownership of the voting ballots. Similarly with her performance in The Libertine (see below) Pike sneaks in and very nearly scoops the film out of the hands of her co-stars. But, as with Moore, maybe her screen time wasn't quite enough to grab the Academy's full attention. No matter - Pike was the freshest and most lively presence in the film, Oscar nom or no.

Helen comes on like a Bright Young Thing - albeit dimly lit - full of the joys of life. But she wasn't all just boozy bewilderment though. She had
See full article at FilmExperience »

Sir Galahad Rides Again in 'Mortal Armor'

  • Quick Links  Mortal Armor: The Legend of Galahad  Laurence DunmoreLaurence Dunmore
[/link]  The Libertine Laurence Dunmore is going back in time, again. The director of The Libertine, has been tapped to helm a retelling of Sir Gallahad's quest for the Holy Grail titled Mortal Armor: The Legend of Galahad. The director's sophmore project is set to be a "coming of age" tale of the legendary knight and his journey to unlock the secrets of the the Christian lore. The project is penned by Joel Gross and overseen by producer Gale Ann Hurd. Production is set to begin next summer in the U.K. The legend of Galahad and the Quest for the Holy Grail is one that has inspired knights errant and knaves alike for centuries. Galahad was said to be a descendent of king David of Israel by his father Lancelot, and therefore a direct relation of Jesus Christ. This relation,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Libertine

The Libertine
Having created an indelible rogue's gallery of lovable freaks and nonconformists, Johnny Depp ventures into the realm of the monstrous in the demanding film "The Libertine".

He delivers a haunting portrait of the 17th-century poet, provocateur and debauchee John Wilmot, second Earl of Rochester, who achieved literary acclaim only after his lingering death at 33, ravaged by syphilis and alcohol. One of the achievements of director Laurence Dunmore's insistently gritty first feature is that his protagonist, a repellent creature of rapacious sensual appetites, grows more recognizable the more physically grotesque he becomes. A dark cousin to such screen rapscallions as Raoul Duke, Jack Sparrow and, yes, Willy Wonka, Depp's dissolute earl possesses a staggering allure beneath the blood-chilling sneer.

Originally scheduled for September release in the midst of Miramax's crowded housecleaning slate, the unrated Weinstein Co. release world-premiered Friday at AFI Fest. (Not an MPAA signatory, the new shingle de-clined the organization's NC-17.) It bows Nov. 25 in Los Angeles and New York, where it should perform lustily. Wide release in January will be more of a challenge, even with Depp starring.

Like its protagonist, the self-proclaimed cynic of a golden age, "Libertine" makes no concessions to expectation. Shot as if through layers of grime, it takes an ad-mirably different approach to costume fare than high-sheen features like "Shakespeare in Love", which put the Weinsteins' Miramax on the Oscar map.

There's a stark power to Alexander Melman's grainy, candlelit cinematography (Dunmore himself operated the mostly handheld camera) that is in keeping with the unapologetic subject matter. But the drained-of-red palette and fetid green light, artifices in their own right, are at times more tiring than expressive. Audiences used to being spoon-fed dazzling period regalia might feel mired in the sludge. For those who can stick with it, the rewards are considerable.

"You will not like me", Rochester promises from the shadows in his to-the-camera prologue. Stephen Jeffreys' screenplay, based on his play, doesn't explain or excuse the behavior of a man devoted to pleasure and yet numb to it. A favorite in the king's court, though no worshipper of the throne, Rochester accepts a commission to write a major work of literature for Charles II (John Malkovich, who shepherded the project over its nine-year development after playing the title role in the U.S. premiere of the play). Rather than get to work, Rochester pursues his commitment to drink and sex, between escapades trading pornographic ripostes with writers George Etherege (Tom Hollander) and Charles Sackville (Johnny Vegas).

Rochester is shaken from licentious routine when he sees struggling actress Lizzie Barry (Samantha Morton) booed offstage. She's one of the first generation of female actors -- following the trail blazed by women like Claire Danes' character in "Stage Beauty" -- and Rochester determines to make her the leading light of the London theater. He succeeds. Known for his brutal honesty, he demands truth from Lizzie's performances, and the fiercely independent actress, overcoming her wariness, flourishes under his tutelage. She also becomes his lover, igniting a passion that Rochester recognizes too late.

Although capable of listening respectfully to the advice of a favorite whore (Kelly Reilly), the earl shows his pious mother (Francesca Annis) only disdain. Matters are more complex with his wife, Elizabeth (Rosamund Pike), who has her eyes wide open to his philandering. Pike is extraordinarily affecting as the woman who began her relationship with Rochester as his teenage kidnap victim and ended it as his devoted caretaker. Morton, though underused, conveys Lizzie's ardor and formidable ambition.

Almost unrecognizable in fake nose and massive wig, Malkovich has a contained intensity as the free-thinking sovereign who embraces the wonders of scientific and intellectual progress and who, beneath the official ire, seems to enjoy the raunchy irreverence of Rochester's literary output. Bawdiness notwithstanding, there's a touch of the conventional in the dialogue's self-consciously literary profusion of language. And however flavorful all the supporting turns, the piece is clearly a vehicle for its star.

Contributions by production designer Ben Van Os, costume designer Dien Van Straalen and especially hair and make-up designer Peter Owen ("The Lord of the Rings") are key to the sense of Restoration-era England in the throes of a hangover from post-Puritan excess. The film is dedicated to casting director Mary Selway, Marlon Brando and Hunter S. Thompson.

THE LIBERTINE

The Weinstein Co.

The Weinstein Co. and Odyssey Entertainment in association with Isle of Man Film present a Mr. Mudd production

Credits:

Director: Laurence Dunmore

Screenwriter: Stephen Jeffreys

Based on the play by: Stephen Jeffreys

Producers: Lianne Halfon, John Malkovich, Russell Smith

Executive producers: Chase Bailey, Steve Christian, Marc Samuelson, Peter Samuelson, Ralph Kamp, Louise Goodsill

Director of photography: Alexander Melman

Production designer: Ben Van Os

Music: Michael Nyman

Costume designer: Dien Van Straalen

Editor: Jill Bilcock. Cast: Rochester: Johnny Depp

Elizabeth Barry: Samantha Morton

Charles II: John Malkovich

Elizabeth Malet: Rosamund Pike

Etherege: Tom Hollander

Sackville: Johnny Vegas

Jane

Kelly Reilly

Harris: Jack Davenport

Alcock: Richard Coyle

Countess: Francesca Annis

Downs: Rupert Friend

No MPAA rating -- running time 115 minutes

The Libertine

The Libertine
Having created an indelible rogue's gallery of lovable freaks and nonconformists, Johnny Depp ventures into the realm of the monstrous in the demanding film "The Libertine".

He delivers a haunting portrait of the 17th-century poet, provocateur and debauchee John Wilmot, second Earl of Rochester, who achieved literary acclaim only after his lingering death at 33, ravaged by syphilis and alcohol. One of the achievements of director Laurence Dunmore's insistently gritty first feature is that his protagonist, a repellent creature of rapacious sensual appetites, grows more recognizable the more physically grotesque he becomes. A dark cousin to such screen rapscallions as Raoul Duke, Jack Sparrow and, yes, Willy Wonka, Depp's dissolute earl possesses a staggering allure beneath the blood-chilling sneer.

Originally scheduled for September release in the midst of Miramax's crowded housecleaning slate, the unrated Weinstein Co. release world-premiered Friday at AFI Fest. (Not an MPAA signatory, the new shingle de-clined the organization's NC-17.) It bows Nov. 25 in Los Angeles and New York, where it should perform lustily. Wide release in January will be more of a challenge, even with Depp starring.

Like its protagonist, the self-proclaimed cynic of a golden age, "Libertine" makes no concessions to expectation. Shot as if through layers of grime, it takes an ad-mirably different approach to costume fare than high-sheen features like "Shakespeare in Love", which put the Weinsteins' Miramax on the Oscar map.

There's a stark power to Alexander Melman's grainy, candlelit cinematography (Dunmore himself operated the mostly handheld camera) that is in keeping with the unapologetic subject matter. But the drained-of-red palette and fetid green light, artifices in their own right, are at times more tiring than expressive. Audiences used to being spoon-fed dazzling period regalia might feel mired in the sludge. For those who can stick with it, the rewards are considerable.

"You will not like me", Rochester promises from the shadows in his to-the-camera prologue. Stephen Jeffreys' screenplay, based on his play, doesn't explain or excuse the behavior of a man devoted to pleasure and yet numb to it. A favorite in the king's court, though no worshipper of the throne, Rochester accepts a commission to write a major work of literature for Charles II (John Malkovich, who shepherded the project over its nine-year development after playing the title role in the U.S. premiere of the play). Rather than get to work, Rochester pursues his commitment to drink and sex, between escapades trading pornographic ripostes with writers George Etherege (Tom Hollander) and Charles Sackville (Johnny Vegas).

Rochester is shaken from licentious routine when he sees struggling actress Lizzie Barry (Samantha Morton) booed offstage. She's one of the first generation of female actors -- following the trail blazed by women like Claire Danes' character in "Stage Beauty" -- and Rochester determines to make her the leading light of the London theater. He succeeds. Known for his brutal honesty, he demands truth from Lizzie's performances, and the fiercely independent actress, overcoming her wariness, flourishes under his tutelage. She also becomes his lover, igniting a passion that Rochester recognizes too late.

Although capable of listening respectfully to the advice of a favorite whore (Kelly Reilly), the earl shows his pious mother (Francesca Annis) only disdain. Matters are more complex with his wife, Elizabeth (Rosamund Pike), who has her eyes wide open to his philandering. Pike is extraordinarily affecting as the woman who began her relationship with Rochester as his teenage kidnap victim and ended it as his devoted caretaker. Morton, though underused, conveys Lizzie's ardor and formidable ambition.

Almost unrecognizable in fake nose and massive wig, Malkovich has a contained intensity as the free-thinking sovereign who embraces the wonders of scientific and intellectual progress and who, beneath the official ire, seems to enjoy the raunchy irreverence of Rochester's literary output. Bawdiness notwithstanding, there's a touch of the conventional in the dialogue's self-consciously literary profusion of language. And however flavorful all the supporting turns, the piece is clearly a vehicle for its star.

Contributions by production designer Ben Van Os, costume designer Dien Van Straalen and especially hair and make-up designer Peter Owen ("The Lord of the Rings") are key to the sense of Restoration-era England in the throes of a hangover from post-Puritan excess. The film is dedicated to casting director Mary Selway, Marlon Brando and Hunter S. Thompson.

THE LIBERTINE

The Weinstein Co.

The Weinstein Co. and Odyssey Entertainment in association with Isle of Man Film present a Mr. Mudd production

Credits:

Director: Laurence Dunmore

Screenwriter: Stephen Jeffreys

Based on the play by: Stephen Jeffreys

Producers: Lianne Halfon, John Malkovich, Russell Smith

Executive producers: Chase Bailey, Steve Christian, Marc Samuelson, Peter Samuelson, Ralph Kamp, Louise Goodsill

Director of photography: Alexander Melman

Production designer: Ben Van Os

Music: Michael Nyman

Costume designer: Dien Van Straalen

Editor: Jill Bilcock. Cast: Rochester: Johnny Depp

Elizabeth Barry: Samantha Morton

Charles II: John Malkovich

Elizabeth Malet: Rosamund Pike

Etherege: Tom Hollander

Sackville: Johnny Vegas

Jane

Kelly Reilly

Harris: Jack Davenport

Alcock: Richard Coyle

Countess: Francesca Annis

Downs: Rupert Friend

No MPAA rating -- running time 115 minutes

See also

Credited With | External Sites