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1-20 of 137 items from 2013   « Prev | Next »


Staff List: The 30 Best Films of 2013

28 December 2013 12:19 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

As with any year, some people have begun arguing that 2013 was a bad year for film, because of the expected glut of effects-heavy blockbusters that litter the multiplexes each summer, or because there was a lack of auteur-driven storytelling for the majority of the year. Though it is indeed frustrating that studios hold their more prestigious films until the last month or two of this or any year, 2013 was an excellent year for film. You shouldn’t have to look first to Sound on Sight’s list of the 30 best films of 2013 for proof, but you should add it to the pile, no doubt. We asked our film writers to provide their personal lists of the 15 best films of the year; everyone’s number-one pick got 15 points allocated, everyone’s number-two pick got 14 points, and so on. (As you’ll see, the point values for each of the 30 films is included here. »

- Josh Spiegel

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August: Osage County | Review

26 December 2013 10:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Suffer the Children: Wells’ Adaptation Enjoyable Camp, Hinges on Grandiose Performances

When something sounds too good to be true, it often is, and while John Wells certainly wasn’t the most inspired choice to helm the adaptation of Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer Prize Winning play August: Osage County, its delirious cast lineup trumps all else. The film belongs to a bygone tradition of cinema adapted from famous stage plays, such as when Tennessee Williams and Edward Albee and Paul Zindel were all names on the tips of everyone’s tongues. While Letts has the potential to be as perversely humorous as any of them, this adaptation only shines in a handful of scenes, gummed up with disingenuous mortar on the way to each to one. Several cast members are in fine form, but most of them have the potential to distract rather than homogenize, and thus, Wells seems to have let »

- Nicholas Bell

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James Franco: 21 Reasons Why You Couldn't Avoid Him in 2013

26 December 2013 7:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

It seems James Franco is now the hardest-working man in show-business -- if you look back at his 2013, that is.

Franco's multi-tasking started to seem like a Joaquin Phoenix-style put-on a couple years ago; not only was he writing, directing, and starring in various films, but he was also, it seemed, studying for graduate degrees at several universities at once. But then, it became apparent that he really was spreading himself too thin when he practically fell asleep onstage while co-hosting the 2011 Oscars. He took a lot of flak for that, but he hardly seems to have lessened his pace.

Indeed, the Oscar jokes ceased once Franco returned to the good graces of moviegoers with the 2013 smash "Oz the Great and Powerful."

According to IMDb, Franco worked on some 49 film and TV projects in 2013, and while many of those were just guest spots on talk shows, that still means that, »

- Gary Susman

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Chris Cooper on Reuniting With Meryl Streep, Family Monsters, and the 'Very Strange Introduction' of Norman Osborn

20 December 2013 1:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Oscar-winning actor Chris Cooper has the careful enunciation of an actor with a theatrical background, and a slight Southern lilt that becomes more pronounced in his performance as Charles Aiken in "August: Osage County." Since beginning his movie career at the age of 35, Cooper's worked steadily as a solid supporting actor with a certain seriousness about him that grounds whatever he's in. Whether he's playing a homophobic ex-Marine in "American Beauty" or an obsessive orchid collector minus a few front teeth in "Adaptation," Cooper always bolsters the actors around him.

"August: Osage County" is an ensemble piece that stars some of the most illustrious stars in Hollywood, the most prominent being his "Adaptation" co-star (and onscreen lover) Meryl Streep. In this adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Tracy Letts, Cooper's role is that of the placating husband, father, and uncle who seems ignorant of the secrets swirling around the Weston home. »

- Jenni Miller

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The Best New York Stage Ensembles of 2013

29 November 2013 9:00 AM, PST | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

A Broadway revival set in the circus. A re-imagined Tennessee Williams classic. A Shakespeare musical. A post-apocalyptic play about “The Simpsons.” A comedy about being Jewish. Whatever the source material or the subject matter, what do all of these shows have in common? They feature some of the best ensemble acting seen on New York stages this year. This year is impossible to discuss without mentioning “Pippin.” Even those who dislike the Stephen Schwartz musical can’t dismiss this spellbinding version, transformed by director Diane Paulus into a circus of delights. Featuring an impeccable leading cast—including Tony winners Patina Miller and Andrea Martin—alongside professional acrobats, the production highlights diverse talents that complement each other, making the entire show literally soar.  Like “Pippin,” the John Tiffany–helmed “The Glass Menagerie” transferred from American Repertory Theater this season, with arguably the Williams play’s most original concept. On a set floating in black goo, »

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Tony Musante, Actor Who Left ‘Toma,’ Dies at 77

28 November 2013 9:52 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Tony Musante, who appeared on numerous TV shows, in films and on Broadway, but was best known for starring in 1973 series “Toma,” died Tuesday in Manhattan of a hemorrhage after oral surgery. He was 77.

Musante left the ABC detective show after one season to pursue opportunities onstage such as his first Broadway role, “P.S. Your Cat is Dead!,” and in films. After he left, the show was relaunched a few years later as “Baretta” and became popular with Robert Blake in Musante’s .

He had a recurring role on “Oz” and was nominated for an Emmy for “Medical Story.”

Among his film roles were “The Last Run” opposite George C. Scott in 1971, “The Pope of Greenwich Village” and 1967′s “The Incident” with Martin Sheen. He appeared on Broadway with Meryl Streep in Tennessee Williams’s “27 Wagons Full of Cotton” in 1976.

Although “Toma” was performing fairly well against highly-rated “The »

- Pat Saperstein

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Tony Musante, Actor Who Left ‘Toma,’ Dies at 77

28 November 2013 9:52 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Tony Musante, who appeared on numerous TV shows, in films and on Broadway, but was best known for starring in 1973 series “Toma,” died Tuesday in Manhattan of a hemorrhage after oral surgery. He was 77.

Musante left the ABC detective show after one season to pursue opportunities onstage such as his first Broadway role, “P.S. Your Cat is Dead!,” and in films. After he left, the show was relaunched a few years later as “Baretta” and became popular with Robert Blake in Musante’s .

He had a recurring role on “Oz” and was nominated for an Emmy for “Medical Story.”

Among his film roles were “The Last Run” opposite George C. Scott in 1971, “The Pope of Greenwich Village” and 1967′s “The Incident” with Martin Sheen. He appeared on Broadway with Meryl Streep in Tennessee Williams’s “27 Wagons Full of Cotton” in 1976.

Although “Toma” was performing fairly well against highly-rated “The »

- Pat Saperstein

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Blu-ray, DVD, Digital Release: Blue Jasmine

27 November 2013 2:53 PM, PST | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray, DVD & Digital Release Date: Jan. 21, 2014

Price: DVD $30.99, Blu-ray $35.99

Studio: Sony

Cate Blanchett is Blue Jasmine

Writer/director Woody Allen’s (Hannah and Her Sisters) 2013 film is the drama-comedy Blue Jasmine, starring Cate Blanchett (Hanna) and featuring the ensemble cast of Alec Baldwin (Rock of Ages), Sally Hawkins (Never Let Me Go), Louis C.K. (TV’s Louie), Bobby Cannavale (Roadie), Peter Sarsgaard (An Education), and Michael Stuhlbarg (A Serious Man) and Andrew Dice Clay

The film centers around Jasmine (Blanchett), a former New York socialite teetering on an emotional tightrope, balancing between her troubled east coast past and a fresh start in San Francisco. Having moved into her sister’s (Hawkins) humble apartment, Jasmine ricochets between the tumultuous acceptance of her new limitations, and the dreams of reclaiming her past life’s glamor.

Well-received by the critics—it garnered a rating of 91% at Rotten Tomatoes based on 153 published reviews—the »

- Laurence

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Team Fyc: Cameron Diaz for Best Supporting Actress

26 November 2013 4:01 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

[Editor's Note: The Fyc series brings together all Film Experience contributors to highlight our favorite fringe Oscar contenders. Jose Solis asks you to reconsider Cameron Diaz's supporting performance in The Counselor.]

It’s not only her scenery chewing, her car-fucking skills, her ability to pull off excess jewelry and animal print or the lustful-yet-motherly way in which she looks at her pet cheetahs. It's her commitment to this insanity that makes Cameron Diaz brilliant in The Counselor. Playing the heartless envoy from hell, Malkina, she creates one of the most compelling visions of evil contemporary cinema has given us. Because her evil seems to have roots in a horrifying childhood (her parents were thrown out of a helicopter!) she escapes the burden of just being a universal symbol of cruelty (a la Javier Bardem in No Country for Old Men). She even shows us a glimpse of what might be underlying human qualities underneath her faux-bronzed skin when she shows envy and certain disappointment at not being able to love the way her friend Laura (Pé) does. Diaz delivers Cormac McCarthy »

- Jose

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Jason Statham on 'Homefront,' Facing Off Against James Franco, and 'Fast & Furious 7'

26 November 2013 1:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

In the deceptively entertaining new thriller "Homefront," Jason Statham plays a man who relocates to the Tennessee Williams-y deep south, with his young daughter, after the death of his wife. Thinking that he left his life of law enforcement behind (in the movie's prologue, you see him embedded with a group of deadly, meth-dealing bikers), he instead runs afoul of a small-time gangster named Gator (played by James Franco) and finds himself fighting for his life.

Moviefone chatted with Statham about what drew him to the material, with a script written by Sylvester Stallone from the novel by Chuck Hogan ("The Town," Guillermo del Toro's upcoming TV series "The Strain"), how he maintains what a "Jason Statham movie" is expected to be, and what we should be expecting from "Fast & Furious 7," "Expendables 3," and "Crank 3." It should also be noted that, for such a tough guy, he's unexpectedly warm and inviting, »

- Drew Taylor

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“Glee” Snapcap: Bathhouses, Tyra Banks and Sam Evans Shirtlessness

22 November 2013 6:21 AM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

[Note: regular Glee recapper Heather Hogan is temporarily stranded without cable/internet. We'll have her full episode recap later today, but to give you a quick rundown on what happened last night and give readers a place to discuss, we're borrowing sister site NewNowNext's recap for this morning.]

When you ask “What’s so gay about Glee?” the obvious answer is “everything.” But we’re here to break down the queerest bits of Glee into bit-sized morsels for your enjoyment. Think of us as your gay cheat sheet to Glee fandom.

Billy Joel songs might not scream queer anthems, but don’t think Glee got all straight on us this week. Tennessee Williams references, America’s Next Top Model guest appearances and shirtless Sam Evans keeps us right on gay track.

5. That Deconstructed Bathhouse Where Tennessee Williams Got In A Fistfight with Tallulah Bankhead.  First stop on the Kurt Hummel Tour of New York, and rightfully so.  Sam can attest, “it’s awesome.”

4. Tyra Banks as Bichette. Because all the adults in Manhattan are fabulous (where have Sarah Jessica Parker and Kate Hudson run off to?) Tyra Banks is a perfect addition to the adult mentors clubs. And, »

- Rae Votta

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John Goodman: A Force of Nature

13 November 2013 4:00 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Most of America first came to know John Goodman as the blue-collar patriarch of the Midwestern family on “Roseanne.”

Playing the role of big-hearted, hard-working contractor Dan Connor on the ABC sitcom for eight seasons could have typecast him as TV dad type for the rest of his days. But Goodman , whose hands and feet will be imprinted in cement at the Tcl Chinese courtyard on Nov. 14, is simply too prodigious a talent to be contained by one character, no matter how intimate the relationship he developed with millions of viewers.

He’s played congressmen (“The West Wing”) and crooks (“Raising Arizona”), murderers (“Damages”) and miscreants (“O Brother, Where Art Thou?”), cops (“Sea of Love”), bluesmen (“Blues Brothers 2000”), jazzmen (“Inside Llewyn Davis”), moviemen (“Argo”), military men (“Mother Night”) ball players (“The Babe,” a suicidal English professor (“Treme”) and without question the most distinctive hyper-aggressive bowler ever captured on screen »

- Cynthia Littleton

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John Goodman: A Force of Nature

13 November 2013 4:00 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Most of America first came to know John Goodman as the blue-collar patriarch of the Midwestern family on “Roseanne.”

Playing the role of big-hearted, hard-working contractor Dan Connor on the ABC sitcom for eight seasons could have typecast him as TV dad type for the rest of his days. But Goodman , whose hands and feet will be imprinted in cement at the Tcl Chinese courtyard on Nov. 14, is simply too prodigious a talent to be contained by one character, no matter how intimate the relationship he developed with millions of viewers.

He’s played congressmen (“The West Wing”) and crooks (“Raising Arizona”), murderers (“Damages”) and miscreants (“O Brother, Where Art Thou?”), cops (“Sea of Love”), bluesmen (“Blues Brothers 2000”), jazzmen (“Inside Llewyn Davis”), moviemen (“Argo”), military men (“Mother Night”) ball players (“The Babe,” a suicidal English professor (“Treme”) and without question the most distinctive hyper-aggressive bowler ever captured on screen »

- Cynthia Littleton

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‘August: Osage County’ Review: Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts Go at It Like Godzilla vs. Megalon

9 November 2013 2:37 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

“Don’t get all Carson McCullers on me,” snaps Barbara (Julia Roberts) to one of her over-dramatizing sisters, but that’s a stone that really shouldn’t be thrown within the glass house that is “August: Osage County,” a movie that feels like a stew of McCullers and Tennessee Williams and Beth Henley and Robert Harling and countless other writers who have assembled the unhappy members of a dysfunctional family under one roof for subsequent fireworks of recrimination and regret. To get the most enjoyment out of “August,” it’s best to think of it less as an adaptation of a Tony Award– and. »

- Alonso Duralde

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Best Movie Ever?: “A Streetcar Named Desire”

6 November 2013 7:11 AM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

If you’ve ever seen a videotaped interview with Tennessee Williams, you have heard him snicker. Like a gay bayou warlord. It’s a menacing, gothic chuckle. You remember it.

You can hear that chuckle resonating throughout A Streetcar Named Desire. In his most famous work, Williams seems to be reveling in the movie’s tense shifts between mannered melodrama and hormonal anarchy. The movie adaptation is half-drenched in shadows, half-drenched in sweat, and as we celebrate Vivien Leigh‘s 100th birthday this week, we should remember Streetcar for the assets that remain dewy and ripe today: two gigantic performances thrusting together from two opposing, but similarly cruel worlds.

Here are five reasons A Streetcar Named Desire may be the Best. Movie. Ever.

1. Marlon Brando is Unnnfffff.

In case you need a refresher on the movie’s plot, here’s as quick a synopsis at it gets: Mississippian Blanche DuBois »

- Louis Virtel

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Gwtw Screen Legend Would Have Turned 100 Years Old Today

5 November 2013 7:53 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Vivien Leigh: Legendary ‘Gone with the Wind’ and ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ star would have turned 100 today Vivien Leigh was perhaps the greatest film star that hardly ever was. What I mean is that following her starring role in the 1939 Civil War blockbuster Gone with the Wind, Leigh was featured in a mere eight* movies over the course of the next 25 years. The theater world’s gain — she was kept busy on the London stage — was the film world’s loss. But even if Leigh had starred in only two movies — Gone with the Wind and A Streetcar Named Desire — that would have been enough to make her a screen legend; one who would have turned 100 years old today, November 5, 2013. (Photo: Vivien Leigh ca. 1940.) Vivien Leigh (born Vivian Mary Hartley to British parents in Darjeeling, India) began her film career in the mid-’30s, playing bit roles in British »

- Andre Soares

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Vivien Leigh picture with Olivier kicks off centenary celebrations

31 October 2013 5:09 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Previously unpublished image of power couple is curtain-raiser for National Portrait Gallery's exhibition of her life and career

A previously unpublished image of one of the most glamorous couples of British theatre, Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier, captured at the height of their fame at a charity garden party in 1949, is to go on display at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

The photograph, by the British photo-journalist Larry Burrows, launches a series of events marking the centenary of Leigh's birth and later this month the Npg will open an exhibition tracing her life and career, which will include many other previously unseen images.

Terence Pepper, curator of photographs at the Npg, described Leigh as "one of the most extraordinary British talents and beauties in the film and theatre world of the second half of the 20th century".

In 1949 the couple, who had starred in a sell-out tour of Australia »

- Maev Kennedy

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Cherry Jones Hopes ‘Menagerie’ Success Extends Her Career

30 October 2013 7:00 AM, PDT | Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal | See recent Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal news »

Cherry Jones’s success in the 1995 Broadway production of “The Heiress” allowed her to work in New York through her 40s and “Doubt,” a Broadway hit a decade later, kept her busy into her 50s. The actress, who won Tony Awards for her roles in both of those shows, hopes that her latest triumph, as Amanda Wingfield in the Broadway revival of “The Glass Menagerie,” by Tennessee Williams, will extend her career through the next decade. »

- Kathy Shwiff

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'American History X': 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Controversial Edward Norton Movie

29 October 2013 7:15 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

It's been 15 years since the release of "American History X" (on October 30, 1998), and to this day, the movie stands as a riveting and brutal drama about the persistence of white-supremacist racism in America. It cemented Edward Norton's reputation as the premier Method actor of his generation, and it included at least one scene (the infamous curb-stomp sequence) that's been copied by everyone from "The Sopranos" to "Family Guy."

Yet to this day, many viewers still don't know the often even more dramatic story that went on behind the scenes of the film, in which first-time feature director Tony Kaye fought with Norton and distributor New Line over the final cut of the film. He ultimately filed a $200 million lawsuit because he preferred to be credited as Humpty Dumpty rather than allow the studio's cut to be released under his name. Read on to learn more about Kaye's epic and »

- Gary Susman

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Emilia Clarke: out of the dragon's den

27 October 2013 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Emilia Clarke is the star of Game of Thrones who wants to appear in Ibsen. Now she's appearing alongside Jude Law in one of the best films of the year. She talks to Emma John about Dom Hemingway, Dothraki rituals, and the pitfalls of Hollywood dating

See more photos from The Observer's exclusive shoot with Emilia Clarke

June 2013: the internet announces the engagement of Emilia Clarke, 26, actor known for her role in HBO fantasy epic Game of Thrones, to James Franco, film star, director, writer, thinker. Text messages fly in from Clarke's friends, some of whom she hasn't spoken to since she was about four years old. "I had my aunt from America calling me up and being like" – Clarke slips into a brassy East Coast accent – "'Where's the ring?'"

She lets out a peal of laughter so gleeful you can almost hear the exclamation marks. She had »

- Emma John

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | 1997 | 1991

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