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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | 1997 | 1991

12 items from 2015


John Osborne on Film: Look Back in Anger

6 March 2015 7:35 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

I. The Landmine

In August 1955, George Devine, director of London’s Royal Court Theatre, ventured to meet a promising writer, living on a Thames houseboat. “I had to borrow a dinghy… wade out to it and row myself to my new playwright,” he recalled. Thus began a partnership between Devine, who sought to rescue the English stage from stale commercialism, and the 26 year old tyro, John Osborne. Together, they’d revolutionize modern theater.

Born in London but raised in Stoneleigh, Surrey, Osborne lost his father at age 12, resented his low-born mother and was expelled from school for striking a headmaster. While acting for Anthony Creighton’s repertory company, his mercurial temper and violent language appeared. In 1951 he wed actress Pamela Lane, only to divorce six years later. Osborne soon immortalized their marriage: their cramped apartment, with invasive friends and intruding in-laws, John and Pamela’s pet names and verbal abuse, »

- Christopher Saunders

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Mistress America | 2015 Sundance Film Festival Review

23 February 2015 9:30 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Sister, My Sister: Baumbach’s Energetic Return to Facades of NYC

The latest in Noah Baumbach’s prolific slew of projects, Mistress America is the follow-up collaboration between the director and actress/muse Greta Gerwig. Though it isn’t as fine-tuned and charmingly buoyant as their 2012 feature Frances Ha, it’s an intelligently droll counterpart to the pleasant yet painstakingly glossy While We’re Young (which reaches theatrical release this coming spring). Witty and well-written, Baumbach’s tone is influenced by a slew of transmogrifying 1980s American films, though the dialogue heavy banter recalls everyone from Howard Hawks to Woody Allen sidestepping on slapstick. Though Baumbach isn’t covering new ground, his post-collegiate privileged characters still inveigled with the paralyzing ennui of adult prospects that graced his lovely 1995 debut, Kicking & Screaming, he hasn’t lost his knack for portraying disillusioned lives lost hopelessly in their own sea of problems.

Entering Columbia as a college freshman, »

- Nicholas Bell

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From Kubrick to Marilyn Monroe, Oscar Has a Stellar List of Shut-Outs

13 February 2015 4:54 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There are 195 individuals nominated for Oscar this year. And when the winners are named Feb. 22, they will become part of film history, joining such greats as Billy Wilder, Ingrid Bergman, Ben Hecht and Walt Disney.

But 80% of the contenders will go home empty-handed. However, there is good news: They are in good company as well.

Here is a sampling of nominees that didn’t win: “Citizen Kane,” “Chinatown” and “Star Wars”; directors Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hawks, Stanley Kubrick and Ingmar Bergman; writers Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Dashiell Hammett, John Steinbeck, Graham Greene, Harold Pinter and David Mamet; actors Gloria Swanson in “Sunset Blvd.”; Audrey Hepburn in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”; and Peter O’Toole in “Lawrence of Arabia.”

They managed to do Ok, though.

It’s hard to say why they didn’t win. Sometimes tastes change. Sometimes there’s too much competition in one year. Frank Capra’s 1939 “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington »

- Tim Gray

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Berlin Review: Anton Corbijn's 'Life' is a Bland James Dean Biopic Starring Dane DeHaan and Robert Pattinson

9 February 2015 12:45 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Only a few years after Marlon Brando delivered his virile performance in Elia Kazan's 1951 adaptation of Tennessee Williams' play "A Streetcar Named Desire," another ballsy actor gave Brando a run for his money. James "Jimmy" Dean, a good-looking, farm-raised, 24-year-old nobody who wowed in Kazan's 1955 drama "East of Eden" before becoming a full-on sex symbol in Nicholas Ray's suburban teenage drama "Rebel Without a Cause." Arguably one of the most sought-after actors of the time, Dean died in a car accident shortly after the release of "Rebel."  "Life," filmmaker-photographer Anton Corbijn's follow-up to last year's "A Most Wanted Man," offers a glimpse of Dean's early career through the lens of Dennis Stock, an ambitious photographer who finds an original appeal in the Indiana-born actor. The film chronicles the relationship between the two men, as Stock attempts to kickstart his career and Dean struggles »

- Eric Eidelstein

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Gillian Anderson webchat – as it happened

9 February 2015 6:21 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

From the impact of ‘The Scully Effect’ on young women, her dreams of doing a comedy with Jason Bateman, to why Paolo Nutini is a ‘living genius’, the actor was here to answer your questions. Read all her answers here

Gillian Anderson on therapy, rebellion and ‘being weird’

2.31pm GMT

Thank you everybody for joining me this afternoon - thanks for all the questions, and for making me think, and have a great day!

2.21pm GMT

The conversation is in process. And the result ultimately is up to Fox.

2.20pm GMT

shanghaisputnik asks:

I saw Streetcar at the Young Vic in July and later how they chose to present it live-to-tape when shown in cinemas via Nt Live, so I feel now I’ve seen three unique iterations of this production. I assumed the decision to go with a wide static frame and the long takes to compliment and keep »

- Guardian Staff

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Stewart Stern, Writer of ‘Rebel Without a Cause,’ Dies at 92

6 February 2015 3:13 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Twice Oscar-nominated screenwriter and Emmy-winning television writer Stewart Stern, who wrote film classic “Rebel Without a Cause,” Dennis Hopper’s “The Last Movie” and seminal telepic “Sybil,” starring Sally Field, died February 2 at the Swedish Hospital in Seattle, after battling cancer. He was 92.

Stern’s credits included the iconic 1955 James Dean teen rebellion drama “Rebel Without a Cause (screenplay by Stern, adaptation by Irving Shulman, story by Nicholas Ray), as well as a documentary feature on the late actor, “The James Dean Story” (1957), co-directed by Robert Altman; 1971’s notorious counterculture indie drama “The Last Movie,” co-written and directed by Hopper (written by Stern, story by Hopper and Stern); 1963’s The Ugly American,” starring Marlon Brando (screenplay & screen story by Stern, from the novel by William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick), which earned Stern a Writers Guild Award nomination for best written American drama; and the Paul Newman-directed 1968 film “Rachel, »

- Variety Staff

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Stewart Stern, Writer of ‘Rebel Without a Cause,’ Dies at 92

6 February 2015 3:13 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Twice Oscar-nominated screenwriter and Emmy-winning television writer Stewart Stern, who wrote film classic “Rebel Without a Cause,” Dennis Hopper’s “The Last Movie” and seminal telepic “Sybil,” starring Sally Field, died February 2 at the Swedish Hospital in Seattle, after battling cancer. He was 92.

Stern’s credits included the iconic 1955 James Dean teen rebellion drama “Rebel Without a Cause (screenplay by Stern, adaptation by Irving Shulman, story by Nicholas Ray), as well as a documentary feature on the late actor, “The James Dean Story” (1957), co-directed by Robert Altman; 1971’s notorious counterculture indie drama “The Last Movie,” co-written and directed by Hopper (written by Stern, story by Hopper and Stern); 1963’s The Ugly American,” starring Marlon Brando (screenplay & screen story by Stern, from the novel by William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick), which earned Stern a Writers Guild Award nomination for best written American drama; and the Paul Newman-directed 1968 film “Rachel, »

- Variety Staff

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Daily | Books | Chicago, Fincher, Rhythm

2 February 2015 7:45 AM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

"Flickering Empire: How Chicago Invented the U.S. Film Industry by Michael Smith and Adam Selzer offers a well-researched, in-depth chronicle of the Windy City’s role in cinema history," writes Susan Doll at Movie Morlocks. "From the early 1890s to World War I, the city was a major player in the motion picture business, giving the likes of Carl Laemmle, Gloria Swanson, Wallace Beery, Charlie Chaplin and Francis X. Bushman a leg up in their careers." Subjects of more recent book reviews include David Fincher, Wes Anderson, Tennessee Williams, H.P. Lovecraft and Jack Kirby. » - David Hudson »

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Brooklyn’

30 January 2015 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A 1950s American immigrant story told as if it took place a half-century earlier, “Brooklyn” unfolds almost like a prim Victorian novel, presenting a young Irish woman, nobly brought to life by Saoirse Ronan, torn between two lovers — one a polite, red-headed chap from her hometown, the other a brash Italian-American who falls for her during her new life abroad — where her big decision has as much to do with choosing between countries as courters. Beautifully written, but still a bit flat in its transition to the screen, this sensitive adaptation of Colm Toibin’s bestseller, acquired by Fox Seachlight at Sundance, should assimilate nicely with more mainstream fare.

As a nation of immigrants, the United States represents a roiling tapestry of expat experiences, in which each family traces its roots back to whichever dauntless ancestors crossed the ocean to pursue a better life for themselves. The movies abound with such genealogical histories, »

- Peter Debruge

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Maggie Smith at 80: 'a walking, talking flame'

23 January 2015 8:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Jean Brodie, Hedda Gabler, Downton’s Dowager … Maggie Smith has been a luminous and witty presence in film and theatre for six decades. Tessa Hadley writes about her astonishing career

If you’re an actor then the physical creature you are – your given physique and face and voice and range of gesture – is your fate, with which your talent must negotiate. No, it’s probably closer even than a negotiation: I suspect your talent arises, as with a dancer, from out of the body you have, and is inseparable from it (so different from the relatively bodiless act of writing). You may have the gift of transforming yourself, but that transformation too can only come out of your bodily repertoire; you have to have it in you. Maggie Smith the actor is all in those dragged-down enormous eyes with their Watteau irony and melancholy, and in the fine-boned long face »

- Tessa Hadley

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Mark Strong's A View from the Bridge for live cinema broadcast

15 January 2015 8:32 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

A performance of the upcoming West End transfer of Arthur Miller's A View from the Bridge will broadcast live to cinemas.

Ivo Van Hove directs and Mark Strong and Nicola Walker star in the the Young Vic production.

It will be screened in over 1,500 cinemas in over 40 countries worldwide on Thursday, March 26 at 7pm as part of Nt Live. Further encore screenings will also be announced.

Strong returns to lead the cast as Eddie Carbone and is joined by fellow original cast members Emun Elliott as Marco, Phoebe Fox as Catherine, Michael Gould as Alfieri, Luke Norris as Rodolpho and Nicola Walker as Beatrice for the eight-week run.

Arthur Miller confronts the American dream in this dark and passionate tale. In Brooklyn, longshoreman Eddie Carbone welcomes his Sicilian cousins to the land of freedom. But when one of them falls for his beautiful niece, they discover that freedom comes at a price. »

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The Definitive Best Picture Losers

1 January 2015 12:22 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

#20. The Exorcist (1973)

Lost to: The Sting

Crammed in between two Best Picture wins for Francis Ford Coppola’s “Godfather” films was an interesting little year that rewarded another pairing of Robert Redford and Paul Newman (trivia: “The Sting’s” Julia Phillips is the first time female producer to ever win Best Picture). The other big landmark – the first time a purely horror film was nominated for Best Picture. “The Exorcist” was nominated for ten Oscars, winning for Sound and Adapted Screenplay. The horrifying story of a young girl possessed was, rumor has it, cursed as they tried to complete the film. This film about the struggle between faith and sin is possibly the most important horror film of all time.

#19. Avatar (2009)

Lost to: The Hurt Locker

The year after “The Dark Knight” and “Wall-e” missed out on Best Picture nominations, the Academy decided to change the rules and allow ten nominees. »

- Joshua Gaul

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | 1997 | 1991

12 items from 2015


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