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Trek to the Past – Star Trek: Tos Season Two in Review

Star Trek is probably the most successful science fiction franchise of all time spanning six decades of science fiction storytelling. In the series, I will be looking at the highlights of all the past episodes from each season of all five TV shows that went before leading up to the new series Star Trek: Discovery that will be airing in the fall of 2017.

Star Trek: The Original Series – Season Two

Development

The ratings for the first season of Star Trek were low which, in previous years, would have seen the series cancelled straight away, but NBC decided to renew the series for a second season – mainly because it appealed to a younger audience. The series was given an episode order of 26 episodes, which in future years became the average number for an episode order of Star Trek.

There were a few changes in the Season 2: like cast member Grace Lee Whitney, who played Yeoman Janice Rand quit the show due to personal reasons; they introduced a new character called Ensign Chekov, who was brought in to appeal to the younger audience and he had a very Beatles like hairpiece in his early episodes – as this season progressed they got rid of the hairpiece and let him have his own hair(!); and also they added DeForest Kelley (McCoy) to the opening credits which made him the third lead character in the series from that point on.

The character of Mr Spock became a breakout character and a sex symbol after the first season had aired, and in this season there were many episodes centred around Spock – such as the seasons opening episode ‘Amok Time’ which was set on his home planet Vulcan and where Kirk and Spock have to fight to death.

Writers

Some of the writers from the first year returned to write scripts for the second year – including as Gene L. Coon and D. C Fontana. They were joined by new writers such as John Merdyth Lucas, Robert Sabaroff and John Kingsbridge who wrote some classic episodes of this season, like ‘Patterns of Force’ which had that common theme in the original series of Star Trek where they beam onto a planet that represents an alien society ;in the context of earth history like in this episode it represents Nazi Germany in the 1930s. There were many episodes like that in this season, another being ‘A Piece of the Action’ which represents an alien society in 1920s gangster culture. Another standout episode in this season was ‘Mirror Mirror’ where members of the Enterprise crew were transported on an alternative Enterprise. This episode famously had a badass Mr Spock with a beard and the crew kill each other to move up in rank.

Top 5 Episodes of Star Trek: The Original Series – Season Two

5) The Gamester of Triskelion

In this episode Captain Kirk and his companion are kidnapped into slavery and trained to become gladiators. It’s a real “starter episode” if you want to get into the original series; and your always wondering how Kirk and crew are going to get out of this one. It’s one of the many cliché episodes where they have a lot of stylized fight scenes and Kirk gets the girl. But overall it’s a little bit of fun.

4) A Private Little War

In this episode the crew of the Enterprise see the interference of a once peaceful planet from the Klingon Empire. It’s another one that tackles a social issue of the time, which is the Vietnam War, which was at it’s height in 1968 when this episode aired. It’s an episode I have always enjoyed – even if it’s flawed somewhat.

3) The Doomsday Machine

The Enterprise has discovered a planet destroying weapon and a Commodore that puts the crew of the Enterprise in danger, in crazy mission of revenge. This is one of most popular episodes of the original series. The highlight of the episode is the performance of William Windom, who played the vengeful Commodore Matt Decker, and his obsession of wanting to destroy the planet destroying weapon The Doomsday Machine.

2) Mirror Mirror

First of many “Mirror Universe” episodes and I think this is still the best – come on who doesn’t like seeing the crew of the enterprise being bad to the bone for one episode? Plus Spock has a beard and is being as bad ass as ever!

1) Amok Time

I’m sure you saw this one coming… could it really be any other episode? What’s not to love about this episode and visiting Spock’s home planet and watching Kirk and Spock fight to the death? And that brilliant ending where you see Spock almost being human.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Trek to the Past – Star Trek: Tos Season One in Review

Star Trek is probably the most successful science fiction franchise of all time spanning six decades of science fiction storytelling. In the series, I will be looking at the highlights of all the past episodes from each season of all five TV shows that went before leading up to the new series Star Trek: Discovery that will be airing in the fall of 2017.

Star Trek: The Original Series – Season One

Original Broadcast: (September 8th 1966 – April 29th 1967)

Development

After a failed attempt at selling Star Trek to NBC with the pilot ‘The Cage’, starring Jeffrey Hunter as Captain Christopher Pike, NBC told Gene Roddenberry to film a second pilot with a more “action & adventure” orientated plot – which was unheard of at the time. Roddenberry complied and wrote two story outlines: one being ‘Mudd’s Women’ and the second being ‘The Omega Glory’ both of which were produced later on the series
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

18 Star Trek screen projects that never happened

Across film and TV, there have been many Star Trek projects that never got the greenlight. Such as these...

Since 1964 (yep) there have been Star Trek projects that simply didn't make it to the big or small screen. And before Star Trek's second (proper) coming in 1979's Star Trek: The Motion Picture, the franchise had more than its fair share of attempts to come to life, and then be reborn.

This lot in fact...

Star Trek – The (original) Original Series

Here's a thought – the original Star Trek series wasn't supposed to be the original Star Trek series.

The pilot that sold the show to NBC was in fact the second pilot, after the original, entitled The Cage, filmed at the end of 1964, was deemed too cerebral. That's on top of having other multiple issues that TV executives (and test audiences) of the time couldn't cope with – you know, like gender equality in the workplace.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Avengers: Age of Ultron Obviously Crushed the Box Office

Could the latest Avengers movie have made even More money? - Moviefone 5 things you need to know about Audrey Hepburn - HuffPost Entertainment The latest on Miley Cyrus's collaboration with The Flaming Lips - Vulture The not-so-shocking season finale of Secrets and Lies - Hitfix Why Fight Club will survive millennia and beyond - Cracked Where Revenge is going into the series finale - BuddyTV 10 reasons older sibling are the best, according to Pll - Pretty Little Liars Star Trek actress Grace Lee Whitney dies at 85 - Popsugar Celebrity & News
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Star Trek Actress Grace Lee Whitney Dies at 85

  • Popsugar
Star Trek Actress Grace Lee Whitney Dies at 85
Grace Lee Whitney, the actress best known for her role as Yeoman Janice Rand on Star Trek: The Original Series, passed away from natural causes on Friday at her home in Coarsegold, CA, the Associated Press reports. Grace's death was also confirmed by the official Star Trek website on Sunday, which celebrated the actress's colorful life, contribution to the beloved series, and longtime struggle with sobriety. Grace discussed her battle with alcohol addiction in her 1998 autobiography, The Longest Trek: My Tour of the Galaxy, where she admitted that her acting career floundered before she sought treatment. After getting sober, Grace returned for the movie franchise, reprising her role in Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. Grace's son Jonathan Dweck told the Associated Press that his mother had dedicated the last 35 years
See full article at Popsugar »

Star Trek Actress Grace Lee Whitney Dies at 85

Star Trek Actress Grace Lee Whitney Dies at 85
Grace Lee Whitney, the actress who played Yeoman Janice Rand on the original Star Trek, passed away Friday. She was 85. Per USA Today, son Jonathan Dweck said the star died of natural causes at her home in Central California. Whitney portrayed Captain Kirk's assistant for eight episodes of the original 1966 TV series before she was written out of the script. When Star Trek was reborn as a movie franchise in 1979, the actress returned as a chief petty officer in Star Trek: The Motion Picture. Her final appearance as Rand was in 1991's Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. William Shatner, who played Whitney's onscreen boss, tweeted Monday: "Condolences to the family of Grace. She was a...
See full article at E! Online »

'Star Trek' Actress Grace Lee Whitney Dies at Age 85

She lived long. She prospered. Grace Lee Whitney achieved icon status as Yeoman Janice Rand in the original "Star Trek" series and spent 35 years helping fellow recovering alcoholics fight addiction. She died of natural causes on May 1 in Coarsegold, CA, at age 85.

Whitney only played Yeoman Rand in the first eight episodes of the Shatner/Kirk TV series, and -- the Associated Press reports -- in her autobiography, "The Longest Trek: My Tour of the Galaxy," she admitted her acting career was essentially halted by her alcoholism. She ultimately got help and regained her career with help from Leonard Nimoy, aka Spock, who also died in early 2015.

Whitney returned for the movies "Star Trek: The Motion Picture," "Star Trek III: The Search for Spock," "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" and "Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country." She was a regular on the "Star Trek" convention circuit for years but,
See full article at Moviefone »

Grace Lee Whitney Dead: Star Trek Actress Dies at 85

Grace Lee Whitney Dead: Star Trek Actress Dies at 85
Goodbye to a great. Star Trek actress Grace Lee Whitney has died at the age of 85, according to the Associated Press.  The longtime performer, who played Star Trek's Yeoman Janice Rand on Star Trek: The Original Series, passed away "of natural causes," the AP reports, on Friday, May 1, at her home in Coarsegold, Calif. The star's death was confirmed by the official Star Trek website, which celebrated Whitney's contribution to the beloved series, as well as her hard-fought, and ultimately successful, battle with sobriety. Whitney's son [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

Grace Lee Whitney Dies; Janice Rand Of ‘Star Trek’ Was 85

Grace Lee Whitney Dies; Janice Rand Of ‘Star Trek’ Was 85
Grace Lee Whitney, known to legions of Star Trek fans as Yeoman Janice Rand, died Friday in her Coarsegold, California home at 85, her son announced today. It was through Gene Roddenberry’s vision of the future that she would make her mark on popular culture. A mainstay of the Trekverse from the beginning, Whitney first appeared as Captain Kirk’s personal assistant during the first season of the original Star Trek. Appearing only in eight of the first thirteen episodes…
See full article at Deadline »

Grace Lee Whitney Dies; Janice Rand Of ‘Star Trek’ Was 85

Grace Lee Whitney, known to legions of Star Trek fans as Yeoman Janice Rand, died Friday in her Coarsegold, California home at 85, her son announced today. It was through Gene Roddenberry’s vision of the future that she would make her mark on popular culture. A mainstay of the Trekverse from the beginning, Whitney first appeared as Captain Kirk’s personal assistant during the first season of the original Star Trek. Appearing only in eight of the first thirteen episodes…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Rand on Star Trek, Dead at 85

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Rand on Star Trek, Dead at 85
Grace Lee Whitney, best known as Yeoman Janice Rand in the original Star Trek series, died on May 1 at her home in Coarsegold, Calif. She was 85.

Whitney was fired at the end of Star Trek‘s first season, but she went on to reprise her role as Janice in Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. She also guest-starred in a 1996 episode of Star Trek: Voyager that commemorated the 30th anniversary of the franchise.

In her autobiography The Longest Trek, Whitney opened
See full article at TVLine.com »

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Janice Rand on ‘Star Trek,’ Dead at 85

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Janice Rand on ‘Star Trek,’ Dead at 85
Grace Lee Whitney, best known for portraying Captain James T. Kirk’s (William Shatner) personal assistant in the original “Star Trek” series, and several of its subsequent films, died Friday in her California home, The Fresno Bee reports. She was 85. Rand’s death comes just a few months after Leonard Nimoy, who portrayed Mr. Spock on the classic series. After appearing in the first eight episodes, Rand was released from her contract as part of a creative retooling of the show. She would not return to “Trek” until the franchise took the leap to the big screen with the 1979 release of “Star.
See full article at The Wrap »

Star Trek: The Original Series actress Grace Lee Whitney dies at the age of 85

Star Trek: The Original Series actress Grace Lee Whitney dies at the age of 85
American actress Grace Lee Whitney, best known for her role as Yeoman Janice Rand on the original series of Star Trek, has died at the age of 85.

Her family confirmed to NBC News that the star passed away at her home in Coarsegold, California on May 1.

Whitney starred as Janice Rand, yeoman to William Shatner's Captain Kirk, for eight episodes in the first half of The Original Series.

After being written out of the show, Whitney returned as Rand in several Star Trek films, including in the 1979 film Star Trek: The Motion Picture and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.

Whitney regularly appeared at Star Trek conventions and she also wrote a memoir detailing both her time on the show and her subsequent battle with alcohol and substance dependence entitled The Longest Trek: My Tour of the Galaxy.

As a recovering alcoholic, Whitney spent 35 years helping others with addiction problems and,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Janice Rand on ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 85

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Janice Rand on ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 85
Actress Grace Lee Whitney, who was most well known for playing Yeoman Janice Rand on the original “Star Trek” series, died May 1 in Coarsegold, Calif. She was 85.

A recovering alcoholic, she helped many people with addiction problems through women’s prisons or the Salvation Army. Her family told NBC News that she would prefer to be remembered more as “a successful survivor of addiction” than for her “Star Trek” fame.

Her death was announced by StarTrek.com, which recounted that she was dropped from the show after the eight first episodes and turned to drugs and alcohol before getting treatment and regaining her career with help from Leonard Nimoy.

Whitney was cast as the personal assistant to William Shatner’s Captain Kirk in the first season of “Star Trek” in 1966. She told StarTrek.com about her character’s crush on Kirk, “It could not be consummated. It had to be love from afar,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Janice Rand on ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 85

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Janice Rand on ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 85
Actress Grace Lee Whitney, who was most well known for playing Yeoman Janice Rand on the original “Star Trek” series, died May 1 in Coarsegold, Calif. She was 85.

A recovering alcoholic, she helped many people with addiction problems through women’s prisons or the Salvation Army. Her family told NBC News that she would prefer to be remembered more as “a successful survivor of addiction” than for her “Star Trek” fame.

Her death was announced by StarTrek.com, which recounted that she was dropped from the show after the eight first episodes and turned to drugs and alcohol before getting treatment and regaining her career with help from Leonard Nimoy.

Whitney was cast as the personal assistant to William Shatner’s Captain Kirk in the first season of “Star Trek” in 1966. She told StarTrek.com about her character’s crush on Kirk, “It could not be consummated. It had to be love from afar,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Janice Rand on 'Star Trek,' Dies at 85

Grace Lee Whitney, Yeoman Janice Rand on 'Star Trek,' Dies at 85
Grace Lee Whitney, who played the loyal Janice Rand, the personal assistant who served Captain James T. Kirk (William Shatner) aboard the USS Enterprise during the first season of Star Trek, has died. She was 85. Whitney, who reprised her role as Rand in four Star Trek films and in a 1996 episode of Star Trek: Voyager, died Friday at her home in Coarsegold, Calif., her son told The Fresno Bee. The attractive blond also appeared in two Billy Wilder films that starred Jack Lemmon: 1959’s Some Like It Hot (as one of the members of the all-

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Education Impact Report: 110 Students to Watch

  • Variety - Film News
In honor of its 110th anniversary, Variety selects 110 students who represent the future of film, media and entertainment.

Nayna Agrawal

Age: 29

School: Northwestern U.

Major: Mfa writing for screen and stage

High Marks: Agrawal’s plays have been produced in theaters in Chicago; Evanston, Ill.; Ithaca, N.Y.; New Bedford, Mass.; and Seattle. She was a writing intern with HBO last summer and the winner of an Emmy Foundation scholarship.

Viraj Ajmeri

Age: 25

School: Ringling College of Art and Design

Major: Motion design

High Marks: Not only did Ajmeri intern with Psyop and the Mill, two premier motion design studios in New York, but also has been offered a job with the latter. Ajmeri’s national and local freelance work includes a new musicvideo for Jason Derulo.

Will Arbery

Age: 25

School: Northwestern U.

Major: Mfa writing for screen and stage

High Marks: Arbery’s “The Logic” was
See full article at Variety - Film News »

My Love/Hate Affair With ‘Star Trek’

Star Trek – and we’re talking the original 1966-69 series here – was a lousy TV show. I was 11 years old when the series debuted on NBC and I thought it was a lousy show then.

That’s why I couldn’t stand the Trekkies even back before there was a name for them. My first run-in with a pre-Trekkie Trekkie was Vincent DePalma. In seventh grade, Vincent had his mother make a sparkly Star Fleet emblem for a corduroy pullover to make it look like the uniform blouses on the show. He wore it to school which I thought was him begging to get his ass beat. He’d built a full-sized replica of the helm/navigation console from the Enterprise bridge in his basement. His father worked for Bell Telephone and had gotten him banks of light-up buttons that really worked. His dream was to eventually recreate the entire bridge in his basement.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Star Trek’s Walter Koenig To Receive Hollywood Star

Walter Koenig, who played Pavel Chekov in the original Star Trek series, is set to receive his star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame. He is the last cast member of the original crew to receive the honour and he will unveil the star on Hollywood Boulevard on September 10th 2012. It’s being reported that the star will be close to the plaque of friend and co-star George Takei, who played Mr Sulu.

A two-day celebration will coincide with the event. On 8th September there will be a gala event that will also mark the 46th anniversary of Star Trek which first aired in 1966. The following day Koenig will be on the receiving end of a roast at the Beverly Garland Hotel.

Attending the celebration will be fellow Star Trek actors Leonard Nimoy, Nichelle Nichols, Grace Lee Whitney, Marina Sirtis, Alan Ruck, Armin Shimerman, Tim Russ, Gary Graham, J.G. Hertzler,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Star Trek Faq: Everything Left to Know About the First Voyages of the Starship Enterprise Book Review

Star Trek Faq: Everything Left to Know About the First Voyages of the Starship Enterprise is a new, non-fiction Star Trek book that is meant both for die-hard and casual fans of the original Star Trek series created in the 1960s. Despite the title, the book isn’t set up in a question and answer format, and the book has answers to some questions that have probably only occurred to a small number of people. This book is meant to be a distillation of information published elsewhere, but even at 413 pages, don’t expect technical details like an explanation of star dates or warp drive. There is an obligatory episode guide, but thankfully, the plot synopses are kept short. From my fan perspective, its pages do contain some interesting information that I wasn’t aware of. The author, Mark Clark, is a Star Trek fan, but he is also a film historian,
See full article at FilmJunk »
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