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The Dark Crystal 4K Restoration Coming to Theaters in February from Fathom Events, The Jim Henson Company, and Universal Pictures

Presented by Fathom Events, The Jim Henson Company, and Universal Pictures as a two-night event, the recently restored The Dark Crystal (1982) will mesmerize audiences in theaters on February 25th and 28th. Keep reading for more awesome news on the beloved film from the minds of Jim Henson and Frank Oz:

Press Release: Denver – December 12, 2017 – Thirty-five years after it first stunned audiences and critics with its unprecedented visions and mythic storytelling, Jim Henson’s 1982 epic fantasy-adventure “The Dark Crystal,” co-directed by Henson and Frank Oz, will return to big screens nationwide in a special two-night presentation from Fathom Events, The Jim Henson Company and Universal Pictures.

Newly restored in 4K (at select theaters), “The Dark Crystal” is a visually spectacular tale of a young hero who must find a legendary relic in order restore harmony to the universe. A watershed in fantasy filmmaking produced by Gary Kurtz (Star Wars, The Empire Strikes Back
See full article at DailyDead »

Film / Notfilm

An experimental film by an Irish playwright, shot in New York with a silent comedian at the twilight of his career? Samuel Beckett’s inquiry into the nature of movies (and existence?) befuddled viewers not versed in film theory; Ross Lipman’s retrospective documentary about its making asks all the questions and gets some good answers.

First there’s the film itself, called just Film from 1965. By that year our high school textbooks had already enshrined Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot as a key item for introducing kids to modern theater, existentialism, etc. … the California school system was pretty progressive in those days. But Beckett had a yen to say something in the film medium, and his publisher Barney Rosset helped him put a movie together. The Milestone Cinematheque presents the UCLA Film & Television Archive’s restoration of Film on its own disc, accompanied by a videotaped TV production
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

SXSW Film Review: ‘Madre’

SXSW Film Review: ‘Madre’
The age-old complaint that “you just can’t get good servants these days” is raised to a hysterical pitch in “Madre,” in which a bourgeoise Santiago housewife fears her Filipina nanny-cum-housekeeper is some kind of voodoo usurper. Flat and sometimes downright laughable as a thriller, and oddly skittish about embracing its horror aspects, this is a disappointing second feature for actor and VFX supervisor-turned-writer-director Aaron Burns, whose prior U.S. indie seriocomedy “Blatino” was well-received on the festival circuit. The marketable genre aspects of the Chilean-produced, Spanish-language film have nonetheless attracted Netflix, which picked up global streaming rights for this disposable home-viewing item.

Diana Prieto (Daniela Ramirez) is pregnant with a second child while stressfully coping with her first born. Diagnosed with severe autism, approximately 10-year-old Martin (Matias Bassi) can be unpredictably violent. He still wears diapers, must be spoon-fed in a high chair, and gets strapped down in bed
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Game of Thrones' Actor Peter Vaughan Dead at 93

'Game of Thrones' Actor Peter Vaughan Dead at 93
British actor Peter Vaughan died on Tuesday morning at age 93, multiple news outlets report.

His agent, Sally Long-Innes, told BBC News that Vaughan "died peacefully with his family around him."

Exclusive: Emilia Clarke and Sophie Turner Talk Game of Thrones Tattoos and Crack Dragon Jokes

The actor is perhaps best known by American TV audiences for his role as Jon Snow's mentor, Maester Aemon Targaryen, on the HBO series, Game of Thrones. Vaughan started portraying the character at age 86 and remained on the show for five years until his character died of old age in season five.

HBO

Following news of Vaughan's death, GoT writer Bryan Cogman took to Twitter to pay tribute to the actor. "Rest in Peace to our own Maester Aemon, Peter Vaughan, who passed away this morning at age 93," Cogman wrote. "Truly an honor to have known him."

Photos: Stars We've Lost in Recent Years

In the U.K. Vaughan
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Roderick Graham obituary

My husband, Roderick Graham, who has died aged 81, was an award-winning television drama producer and director.

Among Roderick’s credits was the popular police series Z-Cars, first aired in the early 1960s, and Elizabeth R (1971), starring Glenda Jackson, which he produced and part-directed. It won four Primetime Emmys in Hollywood, the first British television series to win such an accolade. He also developed The Sextet (1972) – a series of six plays starring, among others, Denholm Elliott, Billie Whitelaw and Dennis Waterman.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

10 Commonly Overlooked Horror Films Worth Seeing

When I was a kid, I used to love a scary movie. I remember catching the original The Haunting (1963) one night on Channel 9’s Million Dollar Movie when I was home alone. Before it was over, I had every light in the house on. When my mother got home she was screaming she’d been able to see the house glowing from two blocks away. The only thing screaming louder than her was the electricity meter.

That was something of an accomplishment, scaring me like that. Oh, it’s not that I was hard to scare (I still don’t like going down into a dark cellar). But, in those days, the movies didn’t have much to scare you with. Back as far as the 50s, you might find your odd dismemberment and impaling, even an occasional decapitation, but, generally, the rule of the day was restraint. Even those rare dismemberments,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Capturing the Krays: A ‘Legend’ feature

It’s been a quarter of a century since a film was made about the Kray twins, and now two have come along at once! The main event of course is Legend, showcasing Tom Hardy in a dual role that has earned rave reviews from critics. The gangster pair were admired and abhorred in equal measure. They represented a strand of culture that mixed community values with intimidation and violence.

Some are looking forward to further exposure for Ronnie and Reggie. Others object to the perceived glamourizing of men who were hunted by the police and responsible for bloody carnage across London. Whatever your view, you have to agree they had a permanent effect on the fabric of Britain and this has been reflected onscreen in some surprising ways.

Don your best suit, pack your shooter and prepare for a rain-soaked car journey into the neon heart of the capital
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Top Ten British Gangster Films

Legend

Tom Hardy assumes both roles in the Krays biopic Legend, which opens in UK cinemas this week. It’s an absolutely belting little crime effort with two amazing central performances from the man Hardy. We loved the film, which you can read the full review for here, so thought we’d take a trip down memory lane to list the top ten British gangster films to ever grace our screen.

10. The Krays (1990)

The original 1990 Peter Medak directed film starred real-life brothers Martin and Gary Kemp and was a moderate hit 25 years ago. Martin played Reggie, and Gary played Ronnie in this gritty movie, which centered around the two Krays’ relationship with their mother, Violet (Billie Whitelaw), and their rise to power in the London underworld Roger Daltrey wanted to produce a film about the Kray twins after acquiring the rights to John Pearson’s book “The Profession Of Violence,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Film Review: Tom Hardy in ‘Legend’

Film Review: Tom Hardy in ‘Legend’
There are two good reasons to make what might otherwise seem an inessential new biopic of Ronnie and Reggie Kray — and both of them, as it happens, take the formidable form of Tom Hardy. Playing both the infamously savage Cockney crime lords in a dazzling feat of thespian self-splicing to rival Jeremy Irons in “Dead Ringers,” Hardy’s inspired twin turn elevates and complicates the otherwise straightforward terrain of “Legend,” in which U.S. writer-helmer Brian Helgeland gives London’s East End gangland a slightly touristic candy-coating of Swinging ’60s glamor. While Helgeland’s script lacks the wit and grit of his Oscar-winning job on “L.A. Confidential,” this lengthy, engrossing underworld saga creditably attempts to work a female perspective — that of Reggie’s innocent wife, Frances — into these laddish proceedings. If the Hardy Boys’ film-swallowing contribution ultimately thwarts the effort, that can’t be helped.

Given an enduring local fascination with the Brothers Kray,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Zipper | Review

The Ballad of Franks and Beans: Stephens’ Dips Toes and Other Bits into Political Scandal

It is still very much a man’s world, or so the expectedly corrupt judicial landscape seems to be sighing as it unrolls before our eyes with near clinical precision and predictability in Mora Stephens’ sophomore feature Zipper. Another politically minded effort, her first feature in a decade since 2005’s Democrat/Republican ideals face-off Conventioneers, this thriller skirts in and out of issue concerning addiction and the abuse of power without really delving into either beyond superficialities. Featuring a notable, comely cast and co-written by Stephens’ spouse Joel Viertel, there’s a dark cynicism managing to rear its face from time to time, but given we’re never surprised or endeared towards this group of slow-to-strike piranhas, this scandal sheet is a tale as old as time.

Sam Ellis (Patrick Wilson) is a federal prosecutor
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

After 25 years, ‘The Krays’ still holds up

The Krays

Written by Philip Ridley

Directed by Peter Medak

UK, 1990

Gangster movies have been entertaining audiences since the inception of cinema. A well-constructed gangster film can attract respectable actors, reap critical praise, and accrue the life-long love of fans in a way that few other genres can. Mean Streets, Infernal Affairs, and Goodfellas are all classic films that continue to resonate with audiences long after their theatrical runs. While most favorite gangster movie conversations include the usual round up of The Godfather, Scarface and The Departed, there is a little known British film that warrants a place in the conversation. Back in 1990, director Peter Medak’s biographical crime/drama film The Krays, flew under the radar of everyone but the most hardcore gangster-flick nerds. With the upcoming film Legend (featuring Tom Hardy in the role of both Kray twins) just on the horizon, it seemed like an appropriate time
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The 2015 Screen Actors' Guild Awards – as it happened

It was the final big American film and TV awards ceremony before the Oscars, and the one most likely to indicate who will be going home with Academy awards in a month’s time. Find out if Hollywood’s most celebrated actors perfect their speeches ... or losers’ faces

Screen Actors Guild awards 2015: the winners in pictures

10.09pm Et

A quick-fire night then with a couple of surprises thrown in, mostly in TV.

Uzo Aduba started the evening by winning best female actor in a comedy series for her work in Orange is the New Black, which follows the Globes giving their equivalent to Gina Rodriguez.

9.56pm Et

Costner is back and… well… that’s it.

9.55pm Et

Naomi Watts on the other hand is clearly very happy to be there. Zach Galifianakis takes the piss out of Julianne Moore’s “When I was on As the World Turns” moment,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2015: #95. Brian Helgeland’s Legend

Legend

Director: Brian Helgeland // Writer: Brian Helgeland

There was initially a lot of promise for writer turned director Brian Helgeland’s career, his directorial debut was the entertaining 1999 adaptation of the Donald E. Westlake (aka Richard Stark) novel The Hunter, which was titled Payback for his version. Following that up with a pair of Heath Ledger titles, A Knight’s Tale and the doomed The Order, we didn’t see Helgeland get in the director’s seat again until 2013 with 42. He’s sticking with based on true story stuff with this resurrection of the notorious Kray Bros., the subject of an enjoyable Peter Medak film from 1990, The Krays. Here, we have Tom Hardy playing the twin gangsters, one of the few performers that can supersede the shortcomings of Helgeland and co-star Emily Browning to nab a slot on our list (we’re also curious as to the absence of Violet Kray,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Billie Whitelaw, Esteemed Actress Of Stage And Screen, Dead At 82

  • CinemaRetro
Billie Whitelaw, the acclaimed British actress who won praise for her roles on stage as well as on screen, has died in a nursing home at age 82. Whitelaw began appearing in British films in the 1960s and gradually became one of the nation's most reliable and respected actresses. Her film titles include "Carve Her Name With Pride", "Charlie Bubbles", "The Krays", "Gumshoe", Hitchcock's "Frenzy", "Start the Revolution Without Me", "The Dark Crystal" and her final big screen venture, the 2007 hit cult comedy "Hot Fuzz". She is best known to American audiences as Mrs. Baylock, the creepy housemaid from the 1976 version of "The Omen" who has a knock-down brawl to the death with Gregory Peck. Whitelaw, who was also a popular presence through frequent appearances in television series, attributed her rise to stardom to her close association with avant garde playwright Samuel Beckett, with whom she collaborated on numerous acclaimed stage productions.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Billie Whitelaw Of ‘The Omen’ & ‘The Krays’, Beckett Muse Is Dead At 82

  • Deadline
Billie Whitelaw Of ‘The Omen’ & ‘The Krays’, Beckett Muse Is Dead At 82
Update Tuesday, 7:00 a.m. with more information, below:

Stage, screen and radio actress Billie Whitelaw was perhaps best known to international audiences for her role as Mrs. Baylock in 1976 horror film The Omen, but she had a versatile career at home in the UK where she was a muse to Samuel Beckett and won BAFTAs for her film and television work. Whitelaw died on Sunday at a London nursing home, her son told the BBC. She was 82. Among her many big-screen credits, which stretch back to 1953, are 1967’s Charlie Bubbles with Albert Finney; 1968’s The Twisted Nerve with Hayley Mills; Alfred Hitchcock’s 1972’s Frenzy; The Omen; 1988’s The Dressmaker with Joan Plowright and Pete Postlethwaite; Peter Medak’s classic biopic The Krays in 1990; and more recently, Edgar Wright’s 2007 Hot Fuzz with Simon Pegg.

Whitelaw was born in 1932 and made her radio acting debut at age 11, per the BBC.
See full article at Deadline »

R.I.P. Billie Whitelaw (1932 – 2014)

Acclaimed British actress Billie Whitelaw has passed away yesterday aged 82, it has abeen announced. Whitelaw was best known for her role as Mrs. Blaylock in the horror classic The Omen, as well as her regular collaborations with playwright Samuel Beckett.

Born in Coventry in 1932, Whitelaw trained at Rada before making her stage debut in 1950, and first appeared on the big screen four years later in The Sleeping Tiger. She would enjoy regular movie appearances throughout the 1950s and 1960s, including a BAFTA Award-winning supporting turn in 1967’s Charlie Bubbles, and Alfred Hitchcock’s 1972 thriller Frenzy.

Beginning in 1963, Whitelaw gained acclaim for her work in the plays of Samuel Beckett, who penned many of his works specifically for the actress. She would also add a BAFTA TV Award in 1972’s The Sextet, before receiving international recognition with 1976’s The Omen., where she played the sinister nanny Mrs. Blaylock.

In later years,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The Omen,’ ‘The Krays’ Actress Billie Whitelaw Dies at 82

‘The Omen,’ ‘The Krays’ Actress Billie Whitelaw Dies at 82
London — British actress Billie Whitelaw died Sunday in a nursing home in London at the age of 82, the BBC reported Monday. She was best known for her role as Mrs. Baylock, the guardian of the demonic Damien in “The Omen.”

Whitelaw appeared in more than 50 films, including crime drama “The Krays” and comedy “Hot Fuzz,” but was equally known for her TV and stage performances, and Samuel Beckett’s plays in particular. He described her as a perfect actress.

Whitelaw made her stage debut in 1950 in “Pink String and Sealing Wax” in her home town, Bradford, England, and made her TV bow in a BBC adaptation of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s story “The Secret Garden” in 1952. She later appeared in several episodes of BBC police series “Dixon of Dock Green.”

Her early stage career included spells with Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop and the National Theatre. In 1964, she played Desdemona
See full article at Variety - Film News »

R.I.P. Billie Whitelaw (1932 – 2014)

Acclaimed British actress Billie Whitelaw has passed away yesterday aged 82, it has abeen announced. Whitelaw was best known for her role as Mrs. Blaylock in the horror classic The Omen, as well as her regular collaborations with playwright Samuel Beckett.

Born in Coventry in 1932, Whitelaw trained at Rada before making her stage debut in 1950, and first appeared on the big screen four years later in The Sleeping Tiger. She would enjoy regular movie appearances throughout the 1950s and 1960s, including a BAFTA Award-winning supporting turn in 1967’s Charlie Bubbles, and Alfred Hitchcock’s 1972 thriller Frenzy.

Beginning in 1963, Whitelaw gained acclaim for her work in the plays of Samuel Beckett, who penned many of his works specifically for the actress. She would also add a BAFTA TV Award in 1972’s The Sextet, before receiving international recognition with 1976’s The Omen., where she played the sinister nanny Mrs. Blaylock.

In later years,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Edgar Wright On Remembering Billie Whitelaw: 1932 – 2014

Thn were sad to hear the news that prolific actress Billie Whitelaw had passed away aged 82 yesterday, and as well as offering our heartfelt condolences to her family and friends, we wanted to share this wonderful memory piece from Edgar Wright, the director who got to work with Billie on her very final film in Hot Fuzz in 2007.

Billie was a star of the stage and screen for 64 years having making her debut treading the boards in 1950, before also sharing her work on the big screen in 1953. Hitchcock directed her in Frenzy (1972), and you’ll also know her in the likes of The Omen (1976), Quills and many, many more titles in television, theatre and cinema. She was also a muse to Samuel Beckett, one of the most important and original writers of all-time, and had a very distinct influence on his work and he loved her work in return.

We
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Billie Whitelaw obituary

Actor whose compelling presence inspired new works by Samuel Beckett and made her a chilling nanny in The Omen

“I could have easily have become a nun, or a prostitute, or both,” said Billie Whitelaw, who has died aged 82. Instead, she claimed that acting had allowed her to use both these sides of herself in a career that included theatre, films, television – and a special place in the affection and inspiration of Samuel Beckett.

By the time the playwright died in 1989, Whitelaw had established herself not only as one of his favourite interpreters, if not the favourite, but also as one of his trusted confidantes.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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