IMDb > Shea Whigham > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDesk
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDesk
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 128 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

Permalink | Report a problem


Fargo Boss Breaks Down Season 3's Sopranos-Esque Final Scene — Plus: Could This Be the Last Episode Ever?

21 June 2017 8:14 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Warning: This post contains spoilers for Wednesday’s Fargo Season 3 finale.

Well, it’s not Tony Soprano munching on onion rings in a Jersey diner before the screen cuts to black… but it’s close.

Fargo‘s third season wrapped up on Wednesday with maybe the most ambiguous final scene since that controversial Sopranos series-ender a decade ago: Gloria, now a Homeland Security agent five years later, sits across an interrogation-room table from slippery villain V.M. Varga, vowing to send him away to rot in Rikers while she enjoys a fried Snickers bar at the state fair. Varga disagrees, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Fargo Season 3, Episode 9 Review: Aporia

15 June 2017 10:40 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Each week you and I meet here in this virtual space to talk about Fargo, to compare notes and (sometimes) even find amusement in my struggles to make funny -- we've all got our hobbies -- but before we get rolling, I want to acknowledge that this might be the smartest episode of television I've ever watched. Did I hook you? Well, it's true. Creator Noah Hawley and writer Robert De Laurentiis have pulled together all the little threads and bits of nothing from this too-short season of Fargo to remind us that they're pretty good at this TV show-making thing. They still have a few hole cards left to turn over next week, but this next-to-last episode is a master class in character, plot, and mood.

We open on a quiet Minnesota residential street threatening to escape winter, the trees still flocked with snow. A man in a robe »

- David Kozlowski

Permalink | Report a problem


Death Note director Adam Wingard defends his film being set in the U.S.

7 June 2017 12:04 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The director of Death Note has come to his film’s defence for moving the story to America.

The classic manga/anime is being adapted as a Netflix film starring Nat Wolff and Willem Dafoe and directed by Adam Wingard. The story is originally set in Japan but for the live action movie version, events have been moved stateside.

This has upset some fans, as is the fact that the characters are American’s and not Japanese. But Wingard recently defended the movie’s creative choices by replying to a fan on Twitter.

There is no conspiracy to remove Japanese culture from Death Note. Its a fresh version of the story set in Seattle. Also see The Departed. https://t.co/ZezHsFSecC

Adam Wingard (@AdamWingard) June 6, 2017

The tweets didn’t stop there however as Wingard was forced to defend his film to yet another Twitter user who objected to the director’s The Departed comparison. »

- Samuel Brace

Permalink | Report a problem


Director Adam Wingard Addresses Concerns Over The Decision To Relocate Death Note To America

7 June 2017 10:14 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

When Roy Lee was quizzed about those scathing whitewashing claims surrounding Death Note, the seasoned producer argued that Netflix’s R-rated adaptation is “an interpretation of the story in a different culture.”

Change is inevitable, then, and sure enough, the casting of Nat Wolff as moody teenager Light Yagami has arguably proven to be the biggest point of contention since Death Note was officially unveiled three months ago. He’ll now go by the name of Light Turner, who begins to develop a heartfelt bond with L, a world-famous detective, upon discovering the titular piece of script: “The human whose name is written in this note shall die.”

Moreover, in Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata’s original manga series, Light’s dalliance with death and the deity known as Shinigami Ryuk takes place in Japan, though we understand the Adam Wingard-directed film will relocate that story to Seattle, where »

- Michael Briers

Permalink | Report a problem


Fargo Season 3, Episode 7 Review: The Law of Inevitability

1 June 2017 11:45 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

In traditional Hollywood Westerns or TV crime dramas, the sheriff, the marshal, or the local police are depicted as the unassailable line between good and evil, a safe zone if you will. Regardless of the type or scale of danger, you could always feel secure standing behind a lawman... although maybe not directly behind them, because bullets will inevitably fly. Not so on Fargo; creator Noah Hawley seems to hold the police (as an institution) in contempt -- he portrays the law as consistently corrupt, weak, or incompetent to varying degrees.

Interestingly, each season of Fargo also focuses upon a lone, incorruptible officer who won't back off, who faces down fear, and who (maybe) restores sanity to otherwise insane circumstances. Gloria (Carrie Coon) is willing to throw her career in the can -- on Christmas Eve, no less -- to see her case through. She conspires with perhaps the only other honest cop, »

- David Kozlowski

Permalink | Report a problem


Fargo Season 3 Episode 7 Review – ‘The Law of Inevitability’

1 June 2017 5:14 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Shaun Munro reviews the seventh episode of Fargo season 3…

As Fargo’s third season enters its final stretch, it hit the ground running following Ray’s shocking demise last week, with Nikki promptly being arrested and Varga’s presumed frame-up attempt working perfectly. It’s now clear that Nikki is essentially the series’ de facto protagonist, or at the very least the character to cheer on for as long as she remains alive.

Despite the previous episode suggesting that Gloria would be taking no prisoners this week, her and Winnie were quickly thrown off the case, and it was odd to see her hit a brick wall once again this late in the season. Amusingly, the hyper-bureaucracy that Gloria attempts to navigate in order to talk to Nikki feels straight out of a Terry Gilliam movie.

At least it was fun to see her attempting to explain the convoluted scenario »

- Shaun Munro

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Fargo’ Review: Carrie Coon Fights the Mashed Potato Theory, and Season 3 Gets Turned Upside Down

31 May 2017 8:03 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s Note: The review below contains spoilers for “Fargo” Season 3, Episode 7, “The Law of Inevitability.”]

Immediate Reaction

Who the heck is that dude wearing a wolf head?

Pardon our lapse in Minnesotan manners, but the ending of a brief but slow-moving “Fargo” threw us for a bit of a loop. It looks like Yui (Goran Bogdan), Varga’s henchman, but the dark lighting of our computer monitors isn’t the only reason we’re not 100 percent certain. If we hadn’t seen the face of the man who dropped into Nikki Swango’s (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) overturned prisoner transport bus, we would’ve left things at this: The wolf is a symbol repeatedly used for Varga (David Thewlis) throughout Season 5. In Episode 4, Billy Bob Thornton narrated a “symphonic fairy tale” where Varga played the wolf. Episode 5 ended with an ominous shot of a wolf’s head, meant to encapsulate Varga’s looming power as much as it foreshadows what’s to come.

With that in mind, »

- Ben Travers

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Fargo’ Review: Carrie Coon Fights the Mashed Potato Theory, and Season 3 Gets Turned Upside Down

31 May 2017 8:03 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The review below contains spoilers for “Fargo” Season 3, Episode 7, “The Law of Inevitability.”]

Immediate Reaction

Who the heck is that dude wearing a wolf head?

Pardon our lapse in Minnesotan manners, but the ending of a brief but slow-moving “Fargo” threw us for a bit of a loop. It looks like Yui (Goran Bogdan), Varga’s henchman, but the dark lighting of our computer monitors isn’t the only reason we’re not 100 percent certain. If we hadn’t seen the face of the man who dropped into Nikki Swango’s (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) overturned prisoner transport bus, we would’ve left things at this: The wolf is a symbol repeatedly used for Varga (David Thewlis) throughout Season 5. In Episode 4, Billy Bob Thornton narrated a “symphonic fairy tale” where Varga played the wolf. Episode 5 ended with an ominous shot of a wolf’s head, meant to encapsulate Varga’s looming power as much as it foreshadows what’s to come.

With that in mind, »

- Ben Travers

Permalink | Report a problem


Kong: Skull Island Blu-ray special features revealed

25 May 2017 11:20 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Kong: Skull Island is set for 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, 3D Blu-ray, Blu-ray, and DVD release on July 18th with a Digital HD release shortly before on June 20th, and along with the announcement Warner Bros. has also revealed what special features will be included.

See Also: Order via Amazon Us or Amazon UK 

The special features include:

Director’s Commentary Creating a King: Realizing an Icon Creating a King: Summoning a God Monarch Files 2.0 Tom Hiddleston: The Intrepid Traveler Through the Lens: Brie Larson’s Photography On Location: Vietnam Deleted Scenes

When a scientific expedition to an uncharted island awakens titanic forces of nature, a mission of discovery becomes an explosive war between monster and man. Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson, Brie Larson, John Goodman and John C. Reilly star in a thrilling and original new adventure that reveals the untold story of how Kong became King.

Kong: Skull Island »

- Robert Kojder

Permalink | Report a problem


Fargo Season 3 Episode 5 Review – ‘The House of Special Purpose’

18 May 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Shaun Munro reviews the fifth episode of Fargo season 3…

“The House of Special Purpose” marks the mid-way point of Fargo‘s third season, and in many ways feels like a transitory episode, nodding towards the potential dark ends down the road for many of these characters. That’s not to say episode five wasn’t totally hilarious too, though.

This instalment was all about the Stussy siblings, a keenly focused episode that also boasted one of the season’s best performances, while leaving audiences desperate to find out what happens next. It hit the ground running with Ray and Nikki’s new sex tape blackmail scheme, but in typical Fargo fashion, it blew up almost immediately, with Emmit’s wife Stella (Linda Kash) quickly finding and viewing it. Again demonstrating her deceptive intellect, however, Nikki managed to parlay that failure into an even bigger blackmail plot, one to reveal information »

- Shaun Munro

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Fargo’ Fact Check: The Story of Laura Buxton’s Balloon Really Happened

17 May 2017 8:00 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Every episode of “Fargo” starts with the text, “This is a true story.” The use of that card dates back to the original 1996 film, but it’s never been truly true. In Episode 5, though, “Fargo” includes a little piece of reality in the form of the story of Laura Buxton and her balloon. Sheriff Dammick (Shea Whigham) tells the short story as a way to illustrate why he doesn’t buy her version of the events surrounding the death of Ennis Stussy (Scott Hylands). In the story, a girl in England releases a balloon with a note attached. The note. »

- Phil Hornshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


Death Note Trailer Sells The Can’t Miss Movie You Aren’t Hearing Enough About

4 May 2017 9:49 PM, PDT | AreYouScreening.com | See recent AreYouScreening news »

You may still have to wait a while (August 25th), but you’re going to want to keep your eye on Death Note, the Netflix film adaptation of the hugely popular manga by Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata.

Of course, as cool as Netflix originals are becoming, fans might have wished for a big-budget, theatrical release. But, if the trailer can be believed, that might not have been the way to go after all. It’s a movie that requires the freedom to be really crazy, and it looks like director Adam Wingard managed the curious, dark revelry inherent in a story about demonic hit lists. And, for the fans out there, Willem Dafoe is the voice of Ryuk. What more do you need to know?

Actually, the cast in general looks pretty fantastic, especially interesting is the inclusion of Shea Whigham, who impresses me in everything.

Take a look above, »

- Marc Eastman

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Death Note’ Producer Responds to Whitewashing Claims, Says It’s ‘Somewhat Offensive’ to New Netflix Movie

28 April 2017 8:10 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Back in March, an online petition popped up over on Care2, calling for a boycott of Netflix’s newest feature film, the Adam Wingard-helmed “Death Note.” The petition was seemingly sparked by the release of the film’s first trailer, which showed off actor Nat Wolff as the film’s lead, a role that is Japanese in the original source material. As of this writing, the petition has nearly 16,500 signatures (close to its goal of 17,000).

Over at BuzzFeed, “Death Note” producer Roy Lee has a few words for the sudden and swift backlash to his latest property, most of them just kind of baffled (and more than a little ill-informed). The producer is no stranger to adapting remakes of popular Asian properties for Hollywood consumption, including “The Ring,” “The Grudge” and “The Departed,” but he says that the ire he’s experiencing with “Death Note” is totally new to him. »

- Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


Death Note Producer On Whitewashing Criticism: It’s An “Interpretation Of The Story In A Different Culture”

28 April 2017 6:48 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

What’s the one thing Ghost in the Shell, Doctor Strange, Iron Fist and Netflix’s forthcoming Death Note adaptation have in common? Barring the fantastical story elements and built-in fanbases, all four high-profile productions have been accused of whitewashing major characters, which has led many to call Hollywood’s representation of Asian people into question.

And so, after the casting of Danny Rand and The Major (Aka Motoko Kusanagi) fuelled heated debate online, the Internet’s eye of scrutiny has turned toward Death Note after Nat Wolff landed the role of Light Yagami in the morbid Netflix original. Because of the IP’s Japanese roots, many consider the decision to go with Wolff in lieu of an Asian actor to be in poor taste – or worse, overtly racist – but seasoned producer Roy Lee firmly believes that Netflix’s star-studded rendition of Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata’s iconic manga »

- Michael Briers

Permalink | Report a problem


Fargo Season 3, Episode 2 Review: The Principle of Restricted Choice

27 April 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Fargo has a history of bleak, black humor and sudden, shocking violence, which is key to its grimdark charm. So, if you thought dropping an air conditioner on a man's head from three stories up was a wee over-the-top, even for this show... welp, this may not be the week to invite grandma and the little ones over for a screening.

If last week's episode was pure table setting, this week we get delicious appetizers, as the tension rises and the conflicts are cranked a little tighter, yet very little actually transpires. We're introduced to a few new minor characters, such as Irv the attorney (Hardee T. Lineham) and Moe the new police chief (Shea Whigham), plus a pair of V.M. Vargas' "associates," who aren't nearly interesting as last season's mute Kitchen Brothers -- I assure you, what they lack in personality they more than make up in menace. »

- David Kozlowski

Permalink | Report a problem


Fargo Season 3 Episode 2 Review – ‘The Principle of Restricted Choice’

27 April 2017 4:03 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Shaun Munro reviews the second episode of Fargo season 3…

If Fargo‘s season premiere left a prevailing feeling of deja vu, the follow-up moves a little further away from the familiar, even if the key beats are still distinctly Fargo, and this is very much the lethargic second episode the show has essentially made its signature at this point. Like its predecessors, season three will clearly be a marathon rather than a sprint.

Instead of diving straight into the central Emmit-Ray setup, the episode begins by focusing on Gloria’s investigative plot-line, all while introducing two new cop characters, Gloria’s somewhat bumbling, possibly-comic-relief partner Donny (Mark Forward), and stern police Chief Moe Dammick (Shea Whigham).

Perhaps the most interesting revelation here is that Gloria is essentially a Luddite, harbouring a fear for technology and running a low-tech police station which Dammick understandably balks at. It’s an unexpected, refreshing route with Gloria’s characterisation, »

- Shaun Munro

Permalink | Report a problem


Fargo Recap: There Will Be Blood

26 April 2017 8:14 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Need to catch up? Check out our previous Fargo recap here.

The sibling rivalry between Fargo‘s Ray and Emmit only got uglier this week… and yeah, even a little bloody, thanks to Nikki.

Ray’s conscience is nagging him about Maurice’s death by A/C — which is good, because he seemed a little too blasé about it last week, frankly. He shares his troubles with Nikki, and she responds by slapping him across the face. Twice. “There’s something wrong with your chi,” she informs him. “You’re all blocked up, babe.” The only way he can unblock himself, »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Fargo' Recap: O Brother, Where Art Thou?

26 April 2017 8:00 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

For three seasons now, Fargo's heroes and villains have shared the same exaggerated upper Midwestern accent, all clipped consonants, elongated vowels and pleasant cadence. Listen closely, however, and you can hear how the show's creator Noah Hawley has borrowed as much from David Mamet as the Coen brothers, in the way that he has his cast sputter out sentences riddled with incomplete thoughts. So it's a credit to the writing and the acting that although the players are clearly speaking the same stop-start language, they're easily distinguishable – especially when played by the same actor. »

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 128 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners