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Bad Girls Of "Batman" And Legendary Movie Poster Artist Robert Tanenbaum To Appear At Los Angeles Comic Book And Science Fiction Con

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

The Los Angeles Comic Book And Science Fiction Convention presents Classic Movie Poster Artist Robert Tanenbaum, Jean Hale (In Like Flint), Sharyn Wynters (The Female Bunch), and Donna Loren (Bikini Beach) at the August 20, 2017 Show.

Robert Tanenbaum is a Movie Poster Artist with an over 50 year career illustrating every film genre such as Science Fiction, Horror, Comedy, War, Drama and Martial Arts. Robert has illustrated such Classic Movie Posters as A Christmas Story, Battle For The Planet Of The Apes, Cujo, Five Fingers Of Death, Black Christmas, Super Fly, The Color Of Money, My Bodyguard, Dirty Mary Crazy Larry, The Iron Cross, The Eagle Has Landed, Ransom, Cleopatra Jones And The Casino Of Gold, Hot Potato, Mel Brooks High Anxiety and Silent Night, Evil Night. Robert’s art is featured on the first announcement that Jaws was being made into a Movie.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Beautiful Cult Horror Cinema Actress (and Bond Girl Contender) Has Died

Yvonne Monlaur: Cult horror movie actress & Bond Girl contender was featured in the 1960 British classics 'Circus of Horrors' & 'The Brides of Dracula.' Actress Yvonne Monlaur dead at 77: Best remembered for cult horror classics 'Circus of Horrors' & 'The Brides of Dracula' Actress Yvonne Monlaur, best known for her roles in the 1960 British cult horror classics Circus of Horrors and The Brides of Dracula, died of cardiac arrest on April 18 in the Paris suburb of Neuilly-sur-Seine. Monlaur was 77. According to various online sources, she was born Yvonne Thérèse Marie Camille Bédat de Monlaur in the southwestern town of Pau, in France's Pyrénées-Atlantiques department, on Dec. 15, 1939. Her father was poet and librettist Pierre Bédat de Monlaur; her mother was a Russian ballet dancer. The young Yvonne was trained in ballet and while still a teenager became a model for Elle magazine. She was “discovered” by newspaper publisher-turned-director André Hunebelle,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Best TV Guest Stars Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best TV Guest Stars Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: Who has been the best guest star on a scripted show?

Tim Surette (@timsurette), TV.com

Wayne Brady showing up in body armor and riding a horse on Syfy’s post-apocalyptic disaster disaster “Aftermath” needs to be mentioned somewhere in this critics’ roundup, so here it is. But I’ll point out two from intentional comedies that come to mind. Timothy Olyphant’s short run on “The Grinder” as himself was fantastic and if I didn’t mention this my coworker Kaitlin would kill me. But my pick goes to David Duchovny, also as himself, on “The Larry Sanders Show.” We’d largely known Duchovny for
See full article at Indiewire »

Joseph Mascolo, ‘Days of Our Lives’ Villain Stefano Dimera, Dies at 87

Joseph Mascolo, ‘Days of Our Lives’ Villain Stefano Dimera, Dies at 87
Joseph Mascolo, who played crime lord and patriarch Stefano Dimera on “Days of Our Lives” starting in 1982, died on Thursday. He was 87 and had been battling Alzheimer’s disease.

“It is with great sorrow that we share the news of the passing of our dear friend and beloved member of the ‘Days of our Lives’ family, Joseph Mascolo,” “Days of Our Lives” executive producer Ken Corday said in a statement. “The smile on Joe’s face is something we’d all come to find comfort in, and he will be sorely missed. His larger than life presence, kind heart, and unwavering positivity has impacted us all for decades, and will live on in the memories of his many fans.”

Originally from West Hartford, Conn., Mascolo trained as a classical musician before becoming an actor. He also appeared in films including “Jaws 2” as a property developer, “Shaft’s Big Score,” “Sharky
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Gene Wilder: 12 Things You Didn’t Know About His Early Career

Gene Wilder: 12 Things You Didn’t Know About His Early Career
Before he achieved movie superstardom in the 1970s, Gene Wilder did Brecht on Broadway, Shaw in Louisville, and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” with Kirk Douglas on the Great White Way.

Wilder, who died Aug. 28 at the age of 83, also once pocketed $7,000 in an arbitration case waged by the Writers Guild of America West because of four little words: “A Mel Brooks Film.” Here are 12 intriguing facts from Wilder’s early career, as documented in the pages of Variety.

Wilder’s first mention in Variety came in the March 7, 1961, edition, in a review of an Off Broadway play directed by Mark Rydell. “Roots” was described as a “seamy” English family drama with not much going for it, per our critic. But Wilder was “well-cast as the thick-skinned son.” 1963 was a busy year for Wilder. In March he co-starred with Anne Bancroft in a Broadway production of Bertolt Brecht
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Outlaws And Angels Review

Like a heavy Southern drawl that lazily meanders through conversation, Outlaws And Angels drags its scenes far longer than contextually necessary. Imagine a Southerner leaking “Hooowwwwdddyyy folkssssss!” like a deflating balloon instead of clear, concise dictation (“Howdy!” and done). Characters just glare at the screen as director Jt Mollner has a field-day with zoom ins and outs that turn his dried-out, rawhide script into a crackly piece of fragile leather. Overindulgence mars this grim, rough-and-tumble Western splatterfest, which is comparable to a more interesting (but still tiresome) take take on Jane Got A Gun (with a darker, strangely jovial mean streak). Death certainly was a byproduct of the Old West, but could people really be so terse about it all?

Mollner’s tale of frontier justice follows three robbers who interrupt a family’s dinner and demand safe haven for the night. Led by a ruthless drifter named Henry (Chad Michael Murray
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Jane Got a Gun – but most women in westerns still don't

From Belle Starr to Calamity Jane, women rarely wield a gun with gusto in the wild west. Will Hollywood ever do justice to female sharp-shooters?

Jane Got a Gun is set somewhere in New Mexico Territory in 1871. Natalie Portman’s grievously wounded husband makes it back to their homestead and warns her there’s a posse of villains on his heels. The posse takes ages to get there, though, so she has time to park her small daughter with a neighbour, then go and ask her resentful ex-boyfriend (Joel Edgerton) for help, and take shooting lessons in preparation for the showdown. Edgerton has never forgiven her for having ditched him while he was in the army, but since he lives about 10 minutes away, it’s a wonder that it’s only now, after seven years, that she lets him know what really went down while he was away. And it
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jane Got a Gun – but most women in westerns still don't

From Belle Starr to Calamity Jane, women rarely wield a gun with gusto in the wild west. Will Hollywood ever do justice to female sharp-shooters?

Jane Got a Gun is set somewhere in New Mexico Territory in 1871. Natalie Portman’s grievously wounded husband makes it back to their homestead and warns her there’s a posse of villains on his heels. The posse takes ages to get there, though, so she has time to park her small daughter with a neighbour, then go and ask her resentful ex-boyfriend (Joel Edgerton) for help, and take shooting lessons in preparation for the showdown. Edgerton has never forgiven her for having ditched him while he was in the army, but since he lives about 10 minutes away, it’s a wonder that it’s only now, after seven years, that she lets him know what really went down while he was away. And it
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

"The John Wayne Westerns Film Collection" Debuts June 2 From Warner Home Entertainment

  • CinemaRetro
Burbank, Calif. May 19, 2015 – On June 2, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment (Wbhe) will release The John Wayne Westerns Film Collection – featuring five classic films on Blu-ray™ from the larger-than-life American hero – just in time for Father’s Day. The Collection features two new-to-Blu-ray titles, The Train Robbers and Cahill U.S. Marshal plus fan favorites Fort Apache, The Searchers and a long-awaited re-release of Rio Bravo. The pocketbook box set will sell for $54.96 Srp; individual films $14.98 Srp.

Born Marion Robert Morrison in Winterset, Iowa, John Wayne first worked in the film business as a laborer on the Fox lot during summer vacations from University of Southern California, which he attended on a football scholarship. He met and was befriended by John Ford, a young director who was beginning to make a name for himself in action films, comedies and dramas. It was Ford who recommended Wayne to director Raoul Walsh for the male lead in the 1930 epic Western,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

How 'Mad Men' marked the end of one revolution and the start of another

  • Hitfix
How 'Mad Men' marked the end of one revolution and the start of another
There are the 1960s, and then there is "the Sixties," and they only overlap to a degree. Popular culture and popular history have turned the Sixties in America into a dreamscape of mop-topped British invaders, painted hippies, an escalating war in Vietnam, a moon landing, and massive social unrest. But before the rise of the flower children, there were men in suits and short haircuts, women in conservative dresses, and chaste movie musicals dominating at the box office. And it's not like the counterculture obliterated the culture that had already existed. The psychedelic-inflected comedy of "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" was the highest rated show of the 1968-69 season, but the top 10 also included "Gomer Pyle," "Bonanza," "Mayberry Rfd," "Family Affair," "Gunsmoke," "The Dean Martin Show," "Here's Lucy" and "The Beverly Hillbillies." In 1969, the same year that The Beatles released "Abbey Road" and The Rolling Stones presented "Let It Bleed," aging Rat Pack
See full article at Hitfix »

The fantasist: The comic art of Woody Allen

Everyone knows Woody Allen. At least, everyone thinks they know Woody Allen. His plumage is easily identifiable: horn-rimmed glasses, baggy suit, wispy hair, kvetching demeanor, ironic sense of humor, acute fear of death. As is his habitat: New York City, though recently he has flown as far afield as London, Barcelona, and Paris. His likes are well known: Bergman, Dostoevsky, New Orleans jazz. So too his dislikes: spiders, cars, nature, Wagner records, the entire city of Los Angeles. Whether or not these traits represent the true Allen, who’s to say? It is impossible to tell, with Allen, where cinema ends and life begins, an obfuscation he readily encourages. In the late nineteen-seventies, disillusioned with the comedic success he’d found making such films as Sleeper (1973), Love and Death (1975), and Annie Hall (1977), he turned for darker territory with Stardust Memories (1980), a film in which, none too surprisingly, he plays a
See full article at The Moving Arts Journal »

Ben Affleck to Receive WGA West Humanitarian Prize

  • The Wrap
Ben Affleck to Receive WGA West Humanitarian Prize
The Writers Guild of America, West has named Ben Affleck 2015 recipient of the Valentine Davies Award.

The two-time Oscar winner is receiving the annual prize on Saturday, Feb. 14 in Los Angeles at the Wgaw’s 2015 Writers Guild Awards, in recognition of his humanitarian efforts and service to the global community.

Affleck is currently starring in David Fincher‘s “Gone Girl,” but he’s equally renowned for his filmmaking contributions off screen. He co-wrote “Good Will Hunting” with Matt Damon, which won them a screenwriting Oscar in 1998, and directed, starred in and produced “Argo,” which was named Best Picture in 2013.

See
See full article at The Wrap »

Elliot Wax, TV Agent Who Packaged Shows From ‘Carol Burnett’ to ‘Three’s Company,’ Dies at 84

Elliot R. Wax, a former television agent at William Morris and the leader of his own agency, died on May 4 from complications of kidney disease at his home in Lake Sherwood, Calif. He was 84.

Wax packaged many hit variety and comedy shows while at Wma and found success running his own firm, Elliot Wax & Associates, as well.

While in the television variety show department at William Morris, he was involved in the packaging and selling of numerous variety specials with stars including Danny Thomas, Carol Burnett, Diana Ross and the Supremes, the Jackson 5, Andy Williams, the Osmonds and Dionne Warwick. While representing writers and producers, Wax packaged variety series that included “The Carol Burnett Show,” “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In,” “The Sonny & Cher Show,” “The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour,” “The Redd Foxx Show” and “The Glen Campbell Show.”

While a VP at William Morris, Wax made the move into the business of packaging half-hour television.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Greatest TV Pilots: Three’s Company, “A Man About the House”

Three’s Company, “A Man About the House

Written by Johnnie Mortimer, Brian Cooke, Don Nicholl, Michael Ross, Bernard West,

Directed by Bill Hobin

Aired March 15th, 1977 on ABC

Three’s Company was the ‘Friends’ of its day; a sit-com about three twenty-somethings sharing an apartment in Santa Monica California going through the ups and downs of life for the singles set of the late 70s. The American version of the UK show ‘Man About the House’, Tc was considered a groundbreaking show. Hard to believe just over 30 years ago men and women living under one roof as platonic friends was not only a novel idea for television, but a shocking and controversial premise. Juvenile jokes, double-entendres, and ridiculous plotlines were all part of the fun, but Tc was also a true reflection of the shifting morals and values of young America arriving in the last days of disco and jiggle TV.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Lucky Luke – DVD Review

  • HeyUGuys
Utah, 1856. A young boy sees his family murdered by a gang of outlaws. He grows up to become “Lucky Luke” (Jean Dujardin), a suave and cheeky gunslinger who always seems to be able to work his way out of a tight spot. He is recruited by the Us President to bring peace to Daisy Town, which is set to be the place where the continent-spanning railroad will finally join up. In so doing, he runs into Jesse James, Calamity Jane and Billy the Kid. Oh, and everyone is French.

*****

More so than most films, your enjoyment or otherwise of this will rest upon your tolerance for silliness. Stylistically unique but distractingly quirky, Lucky Luke is undoubtedly its own creature, but that may not be enough to win over audiences. It goes without saying that this is another cynical attempt to cash in on Dujardin’s post-Artist acclaim. Lucky Luke dates
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Dexter, Homeland and Shameless Comic-Con Panels Announced

HBO announced their two big panels for Comic-Con, and now Showtime has announced which panels are headed to San Diego. The network is bringing Dexter, Homeland, and Shameless this July. Keep reading for more information about the panels.

Here's the full Press Release:

Showtime has announced its panel line-up for the Comic-Con International: San Diego 2012 which will feature stars from some of the network’s biggest original series. This year’s panels will include the Emmy®-nominated series Dexter, as well as the hit drama series Shameless. Additionally, Showtime will premiere an exclusive first-look trailer for season two of the Golden-Globe® Award-winning drama series Homeland, which will be introduced by series’ executive producers Howard Gordon and Alex Gansa. The Dexter panel will be presented on the first day of the world-famous gathering in San Diego on Thursday, July 12th in Ballroom 20. The Shameless panel will be presented on Saturday, July
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Shall we gather at the river?

The first time I saw him, he was striding toward me out of the burning Georgia sun, as helicopters landed behind him. His face was tanned a deep brown. He was wearing a combat helmet, an ammo belt, carrying a rifle, had a canteen on his hip, stood six feet four inches. He stuck out his hand and said, "John Wayne." That was not necessary.

Wayne died on June 11, 1979. Stomach cancer. "The Big C," he called it. He had lived for quite a while on one lung, and then the Big C came back. He was near death and he knew it when he walked out on stage at the 1979 Academy Awards to present Best Picture to "The Deer Hunter," a film he wouldn't have made. He looked frail, but he planted himself there and sounded like John Wayne.

John Wayne. When I was a kid, we said it as one word: Johnwayne.
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

Interview: Jean Dujardin - 'I'm Naturally A Little Bowlegged'

Interview: Jean Dujardin - 'I'm Naturally A Little Bowlegged'
Jean Dujardin's beaming face and effortless French elegance lent a whole new magic to this year's Oscars and helped ensure The Artist's success everywhere it went.

If it feels like he turned up overnight to scoop up all the acting awards on offer earlier this year - including the coveted Best Actor Award - he's actually been around for a lot longer.

Here's a little something he made earlier - a western, Lucky Luke, in which he plays, quote, "Fearless gunslinger, Lucky Luke, ordered by the President to bring peace to Daisy Town." This is an iconic French cowboy - yes, they do exist. Billy the Kid and Calamity Jane both make honourable appearances.

Sound all right? To celebrate this 2009 film being released on DVD - pushed through, no doubt, by Monsieur Dujardin's more recent global triumph - we've found an interview with Jean Dujardin, talking about the
See full article at Huffington Post »

Deja view: why television is addicted to remakes

As the Us remake of The Killing returns to Channel 4 and a British version of The Bridge is mooted, Mark Lawson asks why broadcasters are so attracted to remaking foreign-language shows

A Scandanavian wind is blowing into English language television. With reports that Spooks production company Kudos is exploring a possible remake of The Bridge, there has also been talk in the corridors of both the BBC and Channel 4 about the viability of a "British Borgen". If made, these series would join a broadcasting smorgasbord that already includes the American version of the first of the great Dane dramas, The Killing. The second series of that Am-Scan hybrid – billed as The Killing Us – begins on Channel 4 on Wednesday night at 10pm.

TV remakes are motivated by a combination of envy and xenophobia: a foreign broadcaster recognises the brilliance of the idea but fears that subtitles and suspicion
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Monkees Singer Davy Jones Dies at 66

Monkees Singer Davy Jones Dies at 66
Getty Davy Jones in July 2011.

Monkees lead singer Davy Jones has died of a heart attack, Reuters reported, citing his longtime publicist. He was 66.

His death was confirmed by a representative for the medical examiner’s office in Fort Pierce, Florida, near the Martin Memorial Hospital South where the performer had been taken.

Jones was a teen idol and lead singer of the 1960s made-for-tv rock quartet, The Monkees. Jones, along with Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork, performed
See full article at Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal »
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