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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 47 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Busan: Hirokazu Kore-eda Boards ‘Ten Years Japan’ Spinoff

15 October 2017 10:30 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Iconic Japanese auteur Hirokazu Kore-eda has come on board as executive producer of “Ten Years Japan,” a spinoff of 2015’s Hong Kong indie hit “Ten Years.”

The original “Ten Years” movie was a low-budget omnibus film in which five young directors envisaged how Hong Kong would have changed 10 years into the future. Three new spinoffs, in Japan, Taiwan and Thailand, will use similar principals to deliver a trio of collective features made by up-and-coming directors. All three features will be sold by Hong Kong’s Golden Scene company.

“The idea of carrying on the spirit of the original Hong Kong film by trying to envision Japan 10 years from now was an intriguing one,” said Kore-eda. “However, I’m a little too old to participate as a young director, so I joined the production as a supporter.” His participation was announced at an event at the Busan Film Festival.

“We never imagined that ’10 Years’ would have such an »

- Patrick Frater

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Busan: Art-House Star Hirokazu​ ​Kore-eda​ ​Boards​ ​'Ten​ ​Years​ ​Japan' as​ ​Executive​ ​Producer

15 October 2017 10:30 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The Japan adaptation of Hong Kong's groundbreaking film anthology, Ten Years, now has some local art-house star power behind it. 

Japanese director and Cannes favorite Hirokazu Kore-eda has signed on to executive produce his country's local version of the hit dystopian film series, joining Thai auteur and Palme d'Or winner Apichatpong Weerasethakul, who is directing one of the segments of the omnibus project set in his nation.

Ten Years, the original speculative film collection set in Hong Kong, was composed of five shorts by young local directors, each exploring individual visions of how there home city might change »

- Patrick Brzeski

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Busan: Ray Yeung Opens Closet With New Film at Asian Project Market

15 October 2017 1:04 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Writer/director Ray Yeung was reading about Hong Kong men in the 60-70 age group that were married and in the closet and decided to interview some of them. The interviews crystallized into the screenplay for “Suk Suk,” one of the projects vying for coin at the Busan Asian Project Market.

The film will follow two men in their twilight years who must choose between their love for each other and the families they have nurtured.

Yeung’s first feature, “Cut Sleeve Boys,” premiered at Rotterdam in 2006, won best feature at the Outfest Fusion Festival in Los Angeles and a best actor trophy for Chowee Leow at the Madrid Lgbt Film Festival. His second feature, “Front Cover,” won a slew of awards including best screenplay for Yeung at the FilmOut San Diego Lgbt Film Festival 2016, the audience award at the Boston Asian American Film Festival and the jury award for best domestic feature at the Outflix Film Festival »

- Naman Ramachandran

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‘Call Me by Your Name’ Team on Romance, Sufjan Stevens, Maurice Pialat, and Sequel Potential

11 October 2017 6:20 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Call Me By Your Name came to the 55th New York Film Festival last week and both screenings were met with rapturous applause and standing ovations (a rare occurrence at the fest). Director Luca Guadagnino participated a press conference with the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Dennis Lim, and also did a public Q&A at Nyff Live with actors Armie Hammer, Michael Stuhlbarg, and Timothée Chalamet at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater.

In the press conference, Guadagnino discussed his collaboration with cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom (who also shot his upcoming Suspiria remake), Sufjan Stevens writing two original songs for the film when only one was requested, and avoiding romantic film cliches.

Hammer and Chalamet talked about the non-verbal sensuality of their character’s relationship at Nyff Live. Stuhlbarg discussed his character’s famous conversation with Elio in the film, and Guadagnino lists all the things he hates »

- The Film Stage

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A Ghost Story: Close-Up on Carol Salter's "Almost Heaven"

10 October 2017 7:45 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Carol Salter's Almost Heaven (2017) is playing October 9 - November 8, 2017 on Mubi in the United Kingdom.“The mosquitos are extra toxic here. Maybe they’ve bitten the dead bodies.”—Jin, Almost Heaven “I washed away your illness and pain. I wish you a good journey.”—Ying, Almost Heaven It was by coincidence that I saw Almost Heaven and the new Blade Runner days apart. They’re worlds apart, to be clear. Denis Villeneuve’s $150 million-plus sequel to Ridley Scott’s 1982 Philip K. Dick adaptation is a big, bold film whose sense of melancholy and intimacy is embedded into its massive scale and haunting imagery—imagery which has, as a welcome refresher on what an audiovisual art form is meant to do, continued to move me a week later. Carol Salter’s documentary, about trainee undertakers in China, clocks in »

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The Ornithologist review – beautiful, erotic and baffling meditation on faith

4 October 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This seductive and playful retelling of the life of St Anthony of Padua, set in a jungle in northern Portugal, recalls the work of Apichatpong Weerasethakul

At certain moments in this dreamily erotic, playfully baffling and beautifully shot movie, I found myself thinking of the naked Pan shepherd at the beginning of Powell and Pressburger’s A Matter of Life and Death. There is the same elusive sense of humour. The Ornithologist is highly diverting and seductive, a pastoral of sorts, and a secular meditation on faith and acceptance, very loosely derived from the life of St Anthony of Padua. However, it retreats into a kind of shaggy-dog whimsy by the end, and doesn’t entirely live up to its visionary promise.

A bird-watcher called Fernando (Paul Hamy) is looking for black storks in remote northern Portugal. Transfixed by the sight of them through his binoculars while kayaking, he incautiously »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Dressing the decades by Anne-Katrin Titze

4 October 2017 8:43 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Luca Guadagnino: "But what I prefer for myself is to be invisible. To really try to - which is probably the greatest of the artifices - to reconstruct something that is not anymore." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Luca Guadagnino's Call Me By Your Name (Chiamami Con Il Tuo Nome), screenplay by James Ivory, based on the novel by André Aciman, shot by cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom (Apichatpong Weerasethakul's Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives and Guadagnino's upcoming Suspiria), stars Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet with Michael Stuhlbarg, Esther Garrel, and Amira Casar. At the press conference, moderated by New York Film Festival selection committee member Dennis Lim, the director, when I asked him about the work of costume designer Giulia Piersanti, gave a very detailed response.

Luca Guadagnino referenced the work of Milena Canonero on Warren Beatty's Dick Tracy, Maurice Pialat's A nos amours, and »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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New to Streaming: ‘A Ghost Story,’ ‘Carol,’ ‘The Death of Louis Xiv,’ and More

22 September 2017 5:07 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Carol (Todd Haynes)

From the first note of Carter Burwell‘s magnificent score and opening shot of Edward Lachman’s ravishing cinematography — introducing a Brief Encounter-esque opening bookend — Todd Haynes transports one to an intoxicating world of first love and its requisite heartbreak. Carol excels at being many things: a romantic drama; a coming-of-age story; an exploration of family dynamics and social constructs of the time; an acting »

- Jordan Raup

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Rushes. Louis C.K., Netflix vs. Film History, Twin Peaks Finale

20 September 2017 5:18 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.Recommended VIEWINGIn remembrance of Hans Hurch, Abel Ferrara has produced a touching trailer for the upcoming Viennale.Louis C.K. discusses his new film I Love You, Daddy at Tiff. Read our review of the film.Recommended READINGFrancis Ford Coppola's maligned masterpiece The Cotton Club has been renewed in the form of The Cotton Club Encore, and it's "one of the best movies ever made by anybody, anywhere, anytime" for Jim Hemphill of Talkhouse."Netflix’s selection of classic cinema is abominable—and it seems to shrink more every year or so. As of this month, the streaming platform offers just 43 movies made before 1970, and fewer than 25 from the pre-1950 era (several of which are World War II documentaries). It’s the sort of classics selection you’d expect to find in a decrepit video »

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Fortress Of Solitude: Jeanne Dielman…

16 September 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Warning: The following piece was written without regard to the presence of “spoilers.”

We see the interior of a quiet apartment. It is lit with the waning diffuseness of a grey afternoon, and there is a woman moving about its hallways with a steadiness of purpose. The camera which affords us this look into her living space is fixated at an angle perpendicular to the front door, gazing at eye level down the main hallway toward a closed door. The woman greets the man who walks in the front door with indifferent familiarity, with silence. She takes his coat, hangs it on a hook somewhere beyond the purview of the frame, and they both continue quietly toward the far door, completing the introduction to an encounter they have engaged in many times before. The camera remains motionless as they close the door, and we never see what happens once it shuts. »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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La Soledad review – a flower of a film amid the ruins of Caracas

17 August 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This parable about the crumbling economy and desperate people of Venezuala, has the hypnagogic rhythms of an Apichatpong Weerasethakul film

This promising debut feature opens up gradually, like a fragrant but potentially poisonous night-blooming flower. Filmed largely in the crumbling mansion in Caracas owned by Armand’s own family and starring the struggling residents who live there, the film is a sort of parable about the parlous fortunes of Venezuela itself. Central character José (handsome José Dolores Lopez) shares one set of rooms in the weathered villa with his his wife, daughter and grandmother Rosina (María Agamez Palomino), who was formerly the maid of the house for the wealthy white-skinned family who lived there a generation back.

Related: Venezuela on the brink: a journey through a country in crisis

Continue reading »

- Leslie Felperin

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Hong Kong sleeper hit 'Ten Years' to get international versions

15 August 2017 6:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Portmanteau concept extending to three new territories.

Hong Kong omnibus film Ten Years is being adapted into Thai, Taiwanese and Japanese versions, with a range of up-and-coming filmmakers and established talents, including Aditya Assarat and Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

Ten Years Studio, which produced the original film, has been working with production companies including Assarat’s Pop Pictures (Thailand), James Liu’s Joint Entertainment (Taiwan) and Miyuki Takamatsu’s Free Stone Productions (Japan) to extend the concept to these three territories.

“When Ten Years [pictured above] was screened at festivals around the world, audience members responded with much emotion and introspection; their enthusiasm sparked the team’s interest in producing international versions,” said Ten Years executive producer Andrew Choi.

“Although Ten Years was a film about Hong Kong, the questions it raised on political autonomy, social tensions and human values, were universal,” said Ng Ka Leung, who directed the last short in the Hong Kong version, and will executive »

- lizshackleton@gmail.com (Liz Shackleton)

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Hong Kong sleeper hit 'Ten Years' to be adapted into international versions

15 August 2017 6:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Portmanteau concept extending to three new territories.

Hong Kong omnibus film Ten Years is being adapted into Thai, Taiwanese and Japanese versions, with a range of up-and-coming filmmakers and established talents, including Aditya Assarat and Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

Ten Years Studio, which produced the original film, has been working with production companies including Assarat’s Pop Pictures (Thailand), James Liu’s Joint Entertainment (Taiwan) and Miyuki Takamatsu’s Free Stone Productions (Japan) to extend the concept to these three territories.

“When Ten Years [pictured above] was screened at festivals around the world, audience members responded with much emotion and introspection; their enthusiasm sparked the team’s interest in producing international versions,” said Ten Years executive producer Andrew Choi.

“Although Ten Years was a film about Hong Kong, the questions it raised on political autonomy, social tensions and human values, were universal,” said Ng Ka Leung, who directed the last short in the Hong Kong version, and will executive »

- lizshackleton@gmail.com (Liz Shackleton)

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Pimpaka Towira Appointed Program Director at Singapore Festival

6 August 2017 10:01 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Well-known Thai director and producer, Pimpaka Towira has been appointed as program director of the Singapore International Film Festival. She replaces Zhang Wenjie, who stepped down at the end of last year.

As well as making films “Mae Nak” and “One Night Husband,” Towira has previous experience of organizing film festivals. She was program director at the Bangkok International Film Festival in 2001, 2008 and 2009, and program director at the Bangkok Asean festival from 2015 to 2017. Towira begins operation in Singapore immediately ahead of a 28th edition that kicks off in late November (Nov. 23 – Dec. 3, 2017).

“My role is to develop the program and to demonstrate the festival’s commitment to South East Asia,” Towira told Variety. “I’ve always wanted to contribute as both a film maker and a festival organizer.” Towira expects to be involved across the range of the festival’s strands. These include the Silver Screen Awards competition, the Se Asian Film Lab, the »

- Patrick Frater

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'A Ghost Story' Review: Sheet Happens in Casey Affleck's Moving Tale of Life-After-Grief

5 July 2017 9:35 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

If the sight of newly-minted Oscar winner Casey Affleck scurrying around with a bedsheet over his head sounds more like a farce than deep-feeling cinema, then feel free to skip A Ghost Story. If, however, you want to see what writer-director David Lowery (Ain't Them Bodies Saints, Pete's Dragon) can do with nothing but unfettered imagination and an abiding faith in the possibilities of movies, then trust us: This is a poetic and profound experiment you do not want to miss.

Affleck plays a musician identified only as "C"; Rooney Mara plays "M, »

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55th New York Film Festival poster revealed by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-06-23 13:45:38

23 June 2017 5:45 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

The 55th New York Film Festival takes place at Lincoln Center Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced yesterday, June 22, that Richard Serra has designed the poster for the 55th New York Film Festival. The festival will open on September 28 with the World Premiere of Richard Linklater's Last Flag Flying, starring Steve Carell, Bryan Cranston and Laurence Fishburne.

Richard Serra's 55th New York Film Festival poster

Recent New York Film Festival posters were designed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul (2016) and Laurie Anderson (2015).

Richard Serra’s work has never stopped growing in my mind and memory,” said New York Film Festival Director of Programming and Selection Committee Chair Kent Jones. “During every one of my many visits to MoMA’s 2007 retrospective and to the permanent installations in Dia:Beacon, alone or with loved ones, I could feel everyone’s sense of the possible opening a couple of clicks wider. I was excited that he agreed to design this year’s Nyff poster, but when I »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Rushes. Robert Pattinson Covers, Apichatpong x Ryuichi Sakamoto, "Girls Gone Wild 1863"

22 June 2017 5:01 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSBlind DetectiveThe San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will hosting what we believe—and correct us if we'r wrong—is the first significant retrospective in the United States of the great Hong Kong genre director Johnnie To.Recommended VIEWINGFor one more day only Gabe Klinger's Double Play: James Benning and Richard Linklater, a 2013 documentary about two directors on different ends of American independent cinema, will be available to watch for free on Vimeo.A lovely collaboration between Thai auteur Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives) and Japanese composer (and sometimes actor) Ryuichi Sakamoto on the video for a track on his new album, async. Related: the director and composer are holding a short film competition stemming from the album. Critics Christopher Small and James Corning have lately been contributing excellent video essays to the Notebook on such directors as William Friedkin, John Carpenter, and Ernst Lubitsch. For Fandor, they've made another excellent directorial dive, in this case into the contradictory cinema of Hollywood comedy director Leo McCarey.Kirsten Dunst and Elle Fanning shoot "Girls Gone Wild 1863" behind the scenes of Sofia Coppola's The Beguiled. Warning: risqué ankle footage!Recommended Reading

The new issues of Cahiers du cinéma (out now) and Cinema Scope (coming soon) both focus on the just-completely Cannes Film Festival and have Robert Pattinson in the Safdie brothers' Good Time on the cover. Cahiers editor Stéphane Delorme has written a scathing, and to our eyes accurate, assessment of the festival, which we're reading in (please excuse us) adapted Google translation:The program of the Official is truly a program, in the programmatic sense: it has encouraged a certain type of hateful, hollow and pretentious cinema which is becoming sadly the cinema of our time.... In this context, two small wonders emerged: Good Time by the Safdies and The Day After by Hong Sang-soo... Dumont, Garrel, Claire Denis, everyone would have deserved the Palme. Authors in an insolent form that are renewed (musical comedy, sex, comedy) and who still know what it means to stage, edit, plan.This week the great American actress Gina Rowlands celebrated her 85th birthday, and Sheila O'Malley has written an excellent article on her and some of her key performances for RogerEbert.com:Rowlands' work has a way of creating anxiety in viewers. The boundary line between character and actress is obliterated; or, it was never there in the first place. Her work is so unlike what we see from most other actresses (even very good ones) that it's unnerving to watch.Alfred Hitchcock on the set of RopeAmerican Cinematographer has republished an essential 1967 interview with "The Cameraman's Director," Alfred Hitchcock:Q: Do you feel that lighting is perhaps the most important single element in the creation of cinematic mood?

A: Motion picture mood is often thought of as almost exclusively a matter of lighting, dark lighting. It isn’t. Mood is apprehension. That’s what you’ve got in that crop-duster scene. In other words, as I said years and years ago, I prefer “murder by the babbling brook.” you’ve got some of that in The Trouble With Harry. Where did I lay the dead body? Among the most beautiful colors I could find. Autumn in Vermont. Went up there and waited for the leaves to turn. We did it in counterpoint. I wanted to take a nasty taste away by making the setting beautiful. I have sometimes been accused of building a film around an effect, but in my sort of film you often have to do that if you want to get something other than the cliche.We think it's safe to say that Twin Peaks: The Return, despite being 7 episodes and nearly as many hours in, remains a mystery. We're hosting on-going and in-depth recaps of the episodes as they premiere, and at Filmmaker magazine Michael Sicinski has proposed five ideas about David Lynch and Mark Frost's new...thing:This transfer of violent energy is connected to the Black Lodge [...] but more significantly it is related to the program before us. Lynch is warning us that Twin Peaks is not background TV, and that in certain respects it is dangerous stuff. Sorry, young lovers. You need to watch that glass box carefully, because you’re strapping in for the long haul.EXTRASSome jaw-dropping analysis by Jean-Luc Godard on the relationship between film and television, courtesy of critic Max Nelson.From the Filmadrid festival, a meeting of two great figures in the film world: scholar Laura Mulvey and filmmaker Jonas Mekas.Confirming the sense of humor of Robert Bresson (he who put Chaplin's The Gold Rush and City Lights as his favorite films) is this photo of the perhaps the greatest of all filmmakers riding the donkey that appeared in his masterpiece Au hazard Balthazar. »

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Joshua Reviews Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 2 [Blu-ray Review]

16 June 2017 6:55 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

In those circles traveled by fans and collectors of anything home video, few things are more hallowed than The Criterion Collection’s first volume of their World Cinema Project DVD/Blu-ray series. One of the company’s most lauded and adored releases in recent memory, Volume 1 of Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project included six new restorations of six legendary films spanning the history of world cinema. From a foundational work in African cinema to a tale of sexual obsession that changed the history of Korean filmmaking, the first in this series has become one of the most important and exciting releases in recent Criterion Collection memory.

And finally, they’re back for a second round.

Again bringing to light six superlative films from across the world, “No. 2” as it’s billed on their website features a treasure trove of world cinema that in many ways rivals if not exceeds its predecessor. »

- Joshua Brunsting

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By the Time It Gets Dark review – engrossingly mystical Bangkok protests drama

16 June 2017 4:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This fascinating, enigmatic feature confidently leaps down the conceptual rabbit hole to mix a historic massacre with transcendent forests and telekinesis

Thailand could yet be the birthplace for a new kind of cinema: Buddhist supernatural realism. This fascinating, enigmatic feature from 41-year-old Thai film-maker Anocha Suwichakornpong is obviously comparable to the work of Thailand’s much-garlanded Cannes Palme d’Or-winning director Apichatpong Weerasethakul. She has something of his quietism and transcendentalism, the same feeling for the mysteries of the northern forests and the alternative spiritual realities that can make themselves plain in a simple setting. But she has a distinctive postmodern angularity and quirk; Suwichakornpong keeps you off balance with shroom-fuelled fantasy and Lynchian departures.

On the surface, it is a movie within a movie about a notorious military massacre of student protesters in Bangkok in 1976. We see glimpses of this, followed by a scene showing a film director, Ann »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Cannes Film Review: ‘The Lady in the Portrait’

24 May 2017 12:29 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

East meets West, and the two gingerly fall in love through art in Charles de Meaux’s “The Lady in the Portrait,” a period yarn evoking the unique rapport between a French missionary and the Manchurian Empress whose portrait he’s ordered to paint. Exquisitely-costumed and voluptuously shot, the film evokes life in the Qing Dynasty court with studied elegance and rare intimacy that make it more than just another Bertolucci or Zhang Yimou wannabe. Added last minute to the Cannes official selection as a tribute to Chinese diva Fan Bingbing, who’s serving on the jury, the film will definitely pique art-house interest in Europe, but isn’t likely to make a dent in China’s commercially driven market.

If anything, the story itself serves as an allegory of Chinese-Western co-productions, in which both sides are simultaneously turned on and put off by each other’s values and working methods. »

- Maggie Lee

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 47 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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