Apichatpong Weerasethakul - News Poster

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Good things in small packages by Andrew Robertson

Don Hertzfeld's World Of Tomorrow, Episode 2 - where will the journey take us next?

As the Glasgow Film Festival opens with Gala Premiere Isle of Dogs, we wanted to highlight Glasgow's other, shorter, festival, due to start next month. Eye For Film will be covering the event from our usual seat somewhere near the front, but even from the programme there are some notable events we're looking forward to.

We're looking forward to the second part of Don Hertzfeld's World Of Tomorrow, and animation is also likely to be well represented at the family shorts event. Apichatpong Weerasethakul receives a retrospective showcase, curating four programmes of his own shorts that will also be screened as one massive all-nighter. There's also a wide array of films from across Asia as part of the international strands. Kevin Jerome Everson's work also features, and GSFF18 will be stretching the definition of 'short' with Everson's epic Park Lanes,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

U.S. director Bennett Miller, British Costume Designer Sandy Powell Set For Qumra

U.S. director Bennett Miller, British Costume Designer Sandy Powell Set For Qumra
U.S. director Bennett Miller (“Foxcatcher”) and Oscar-winning British costume designer Sandy Powell (“The Aviator”) have been recruited by the Doha Film Institute to give master classes and mentoring sessions during the Doha Film Institute’s annual Qumra event which has also announced participating projects for the event that blends creative workshop and festival elements.

Miller and Powell will be joining join Andrey Zvyagintsev, Apichatpong Weerasethakul and Gianfranco Rosi as 2018 Qumra Masters.

The 34 selected projects on display during Qumra — which will run in Doha March 9 to 14 — comprise titles likely to surface later this year on the festival circuit, such as “Weldi,” about a Tunisian father coming to terms with his son joining Isis, directed by Tunisia’s Mohamed Ben Attia, whose first feature “Hedi” made a splash at the 2016 Berlinale; “Late to Die Young” by Chile’s Dominga Sotomayor (“Thursday Till Sunday,” “Mar”) ; and “The Load,” which is set during the 1999 Nato bombing of Serbia and is
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rushes. Remembering Paul Clipson, Uma Thurman on "Kill Bill", Another Gaze

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.Newsi’m drawn to the physical beauty of celluloid, to its grain, texture, tactility, its colors and tones. I find film to be the most challenging and rewarding visual form to work in. Not only celluloid but the mechanisms and optics of film cameras and projectors as well. Zoom lenses, anamorphic and wide angle lenses present all sorts of directions in which to find images. There’s a very intense, emotional charge to shooting on film where there’s rarely a moment when one’s not aware of its fragility, a sense that everything could be for nothing, and certainly the serious cost of film also remains in one’s peripheral awareness. It makes the process feel both exciting and grave. We are heartbroken to hear of the death of San Francisco-based director Paul Clipson,
See full article at MUBI »

New to Streaming: ‘The Florida Project,’ Apichatpong Weerasethakul, ‘The Square,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Films of Apichatpong Weerasethakul

If you’re looking for a dreamy weekend, a quartet of the finest films by Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul are now available on FilmStruck: Tropical Malady, Syndromes and a Century, Cemetery of Splendor, and his Palme d’Or winner Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives.

Where to Stream: FilmStruck

The Florida Project (Sean Baker)

How, exactly, did Sean Baker do it? How
See full article at The Film Stage »

Ghosts in the machine: a night at the 'hotel' where films become dreams

At a pop-up guesthouse, Sleepcinemahotel, Palme d’Or winning Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul has installed beds – and a hypnotic 120-hour ‘film’ to nod off to

It’s late at night. I’m not sure exactly when, because my phone has been off for hours and I’ve long since lost track of time. From my perch, I can see a giant circular screen which seems to be floating in midair like a mesmerising moon. Dreamy images flit across its surface and cast a faint glow into the darkness, which is permeated with sounds of breaking waves and gently creaking wood. I could be on a ship, sailing across the sea. Or, perhaps, back in my mother’s womb, viewing the outside world via a mysterious portal.

Where I actually am is in a large hall inside the Beurs-World Trade Center in Rotterdam. For this year’s Rotterdam film festival, the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Apichatpong Weerasethakul marathon planned for Glasgow by Jennie Kermode - 2018-01-31 12:54:54

Kevin Jerome Everson's Park Lanes

The full programme for this year's Glasgow Short Film Festival was announced today, and it's already raising a few eyebrows, challenging expectations of what short film means. As well as a marathon overnight session featuring the work of legendary Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul - with pillows and mattresses provided for sleepy attendees - there will be a screening of Kevin Jerome Everson's 8-hour-long Park Lanes, a study of factory life, alongside his short work.

"This year Gsff tackles work and rest, through Kevin Jerome Everson’s meditations on Afro-American working lives, and the lush dreamscapes of Thai artist Apichatpong Weerasethakul. There will also be time for play, with late night cult screenings, and live shows from Babe and all female hip hop night Tomboy," said festival director Matt Lloyd. "This March, Glasgow belongs to short film!"

The 11th edition of the festival, which is
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Sundance Review: ‘Hale County This Morning, This Evening’ Focuses on the In-Between

Structurally, Hale County This Morning, This Evening does not do much to distinguish itself from other contemporary vérité documentaries which focus on quotidian details within a certain milieu. But even so, it still finds value in the unique incidents it captures. Send a hundred different filmmakers to a hundred different places, and even if their work is aesthetically identical, they’ll each document at least a few unique moments that will make each piece worth it. Beyond that, director RaMell Ross demonstrates a talent for framing a scene in a striking manner, such as shooting a trash fire so that the rays of the sun shine through the smoke.

Hale County, named after a Confederate lieutenant colonel, is part of the Southern Black Belt. Ross follows a cast of black residents of the county about their daily lives, chiefly young men Daniel and Quincy. They don’t have arcs to
See full article at The Film Stage »

“Film is About Making Magic with These Kind of Challenges”: Dp Diego García on Wildlife

For his directorial debut, Paul Dano adapted Richard Ford’s 1990 novel, telling the story of a marriage that falls apart between Jerry (Jake Gyllenhaal) and Jeanette Brinson (Carey Milligan), as seen through the eyes of their 14-year-old son Joe Brinson (Ed Oxenbould). Serving as Dano’s Dp, Diego García’s prominent recent credits include Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Cemetery of Splendour and Gabriel Mascaro’s Neon Bull. Below, García discusses their mutual influences (including Kore-eda Hirokazu and The Master) and use of Panavision spherical primo lenses. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being the cinematographer of your film? What were the factors and attributes that led to your […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Rotterdam Film Festival opens with message of support for #MeToo

Bero Beyer speech kicks off 47th edition.

Source: Iffr

Iffr director Bero Beyer

The International Film Festival Rotterdam kicked off its 47th edition last night (Jan 24) with an impassioned speech from festival director Bero Beyer.

Beyer addressed what he described as the “pattern of widespread abuse and often quite criminal sexual misconduct, committed almost exclusively by white middle-aged heterosexual men of power or status in the film industry.”

“It’s hard to say what’s more disturbing: The fact that anyone ever considered this behaviour to be acceptable, that so many were willing to look the other way and pretend it wasn’t going on,” Bero commented of the recent spate of industry scandals.

“It matters who tells the story and it matters who we see on our many screens. Too often history is written by the so-called winners, but mostly by bullies and mostly by men. So, if Iffr is part of the film industry: Who should
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Rotterdam sets Charlotte Rampling, Sean Baker, Lucrecia Martel talks

Rotterdam sets Charlotte Rampling, Sean Baker, Lucrecia Martel talks
Armando Iannucci, Apichatpong Weerasethakul also set to deliver talks.

The 2018 edition of the International Film Festival Rotterdam (Iffr, Jan 24 – Feb 4) has revealed a high-profile list of masterclasses that will take place during this year’s event.

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sean Baker, Charlotte Rampling, Lucrecia Martel

The line-up includes several filmmakers who have had success on the festival circuit over the last twelve months such as Sean Baker (The Florida Project), Lucrecia Martel (Zama) and Armando Iannucci (The Death Of Stalin).

Opening this year’s Iffr Talks programme will be actress Charlotte Rampling, the Oscar-nominated star of 45 Years. Her latest feature is Andrea Pallaoro’s Hannah, which premiered at least year’s Venice Film Festival.

Further names taking part include the Palme d’Or-winning Apichatpong Weerasethakul, who is bringing his unique “sleep cinema” project to Iffr this year, and Paul Schrader, whose writing credits include Taxi Driver and Raging Bull.

Iffr director Bero Beyer described the programme as “a meeting
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Rotterdam sets Charlotte Rampling, Sean Baker, Lucrecia Martel masterclasses

Rotterdam sets Charlotte Rampling, Sean Baker, Lucrecia Martel masterclasses
Armando Iannucci, Apichatpong Weerasethakul also set to deliver talks.

The 2018 edition of the International Film Festival Rotterdam (Iffr, Jan 24 – Feb 4) has revealed a high-profile list of masterclasses that will take place during this year’s event.

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sean Baker, Charlotte Rampling, Lucrecia Martel

The line-up includes several filmmakers who have had success on the festival circuit over the last twelve months such as Sean Baker (The Florida Project), Lucrecia Martel (Zama) and Armando Iannucci (The Death Of Stalin).

Opening this year’s Iffr Talks programme will be actress Charlotte Rampling, the Oscar-nominated star of 45 Years. Her latest feature is Andrea Pallaoro’s Hannah, which premiered at least year’s Venice Film Festival.

Further names taking part include the Palme d’Or-winning Apichatpong Weerasethakul, who is bringing his unique “sleep cinema” project to Iffr this year, and Paul Schrader, whose writing credits include Taxi Driver and Raging Bull.

Iffr director Bero Beyer described the programme as “a meeting
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Best Cinematography of 2017

“A cinematographer is a visual psychiatrist — moving an audience through a movie […] making them think the way you want them to think, painting pictures in the dark,” said the late, great Gordon Willis. As we continue our year-end coverage, one aspect we must highlight is, indeed, cinematography. From talented newcomers to seasoned professionals, we’ve rounded up the examples that have most impressed us this year. Check out our rundown below and, in the comments, let us know your favorite work.

All These Sleepless Nights (Michal Marczak, Maciej Twardowski)

Using the combination of a Steadicam and computerized gimbal, Michal Marczak and Maciej Twardowski float in and out of crowded dance floors, house parties, lush gardens, and sun-kissed beaches, all in a way that would make Emmanuel Lubezki proud. Coupled with a near-constant soundtrack of the latest in electronic and pop (as well as a Polish version of Pocahontas‘ “Colors of
See full article at The Film Stage »

Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Andrey Zvyagintsev, Gianfranco Rosi Booked for Qumra

Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Andrey Zvyagintsev, Gianfranco Rosi Booked for Qumra
Russian director Andrey Zvyagintsev, whose “Loveless” is among nine titles shortlisted in this year’s foreign-language Oscar race, is one of three acclaimed helmers scheduled to give master classes and mentoring sessions during the Doha Film Institute’s annual Qumra event.

The other Qumra “Masters” are Thai auteur Apichatpong Weerasethakul, the 2010 Cannes Palme d’Or winner for “Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives,” and Italy’s Gianfranco Rosi, who won a Venice Golden Lion and a Berlin Golden Bear for two separate documentaries – the first time either festival had awarded its top prize to a documentary. Rosi scored the Lion in 2013 for “Sacro Gra” and the Bear in 2016 for “Fire at Sea.”

Qumra 2018, which runs March 9-14 in the Qatari capital of Doha, blends together a creative workshop, co-production market, and festival elements. The event was established four years ago by the Doha Film Institute (Dfi) to help foster first and second works, mostly by Arab
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rushes. Apichatpong's Hotel, Hideo Kojima's Cinema, "Malcolm X" at 25

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSLike to sleep at the movies? Apichatpong Weerasethakul is collaborating with the International Film Festival Rotterdam (January 24 - February 4, 2018), to launch a hotel. Yes, that's right.Cinema's have been banned in Saudi Arabia since the 1970s, but in 2018 that's about to change.The Golden Globes nominations have been announced. We're rooting for Greta Gerwig and Jonny Greenwood.Recommended VIEWINGGrasshopper Film have kindly shared En rachâchant, a 1982 short film by Jean-Marie Straub & Danièle Huillet adapted from a Marguerite Duras story. Available to view until December 15th so watch it now!For IndieWire, David Ehrlich provides an ecstatic rush of montage through this year's commercial cinema.A moving and enveloping trailer from one of the year's best discoveries: Summer 1993, the feature debut of Spanish filmmaker Carla Simón.The first trailer for the latest analysis of American myth-making from Clint Eastwood,
See full article at MUBI »

Women Directors From Europe on Their Foreign-Language Films

Women Directors From Europe on Their Foreign-Language Films
With a record 27 women behind the 92 foreign-language film submissions, Variety posed the same questions to a selection of directors about their experiences. What was your biggest obstacle in making the film? What was the key to your breakthrough? What is your creative goal? Who are your filmmaking heroes? What would you like the world to know about being a woman film director and the message you want to send? Here are their stories.

Anahit Abad

Yeva” (Armenia)

“Funding the project is the biggest obstacle, just like for most filmmakers who are trying to make their first film. Particularly, I can say that some of the most important obstacles I faced during the production of my film are being a woman, being of Armenian descent and of course, the fact that I am shorter than average.

“With all the financial obstacles, the fact that I was raised in the Iranian cinema and the location was somehow unfamiliar … I used
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Singapore Festival: Se Asia’s Commissioners Seek Fresh Projects

Southeast Asian content commissioning powerhouses congregated at the Singapore International Film Festival to discuss the kind of content they are looking for at a panel discussion titled ‘Producing Stories in Southeast Asia’.

“Come to us with a project that you believe in and don’t worry about what the broadcaster wants,” said Garon De Silva, director of original productions at Singapore-headquartered HBO Asia.

De Silva was joined on the panel by Najwa Abu Bakar, VP at Malaysia’s Astro Shaw, and Daphne Yang, executive director at Taiwan’s Catchplay. The packed audience consisted mostly of regional content creators.

Astro Shaw recently invested in Mouly Surya’s “Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts” and Jenny Suen and Christopher Doyle’s “The White Girl”, both playing at Sgiff. Previously, it invested in Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s “Cemetery of Splendor.” HBO Asia has commissioned a slew of originals including “Halfworlds” and “Serangoon Road.” Catchplay had a stake in the Taiwanese remake
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'The Seen and Unseen': Film Review | Busan 2017

The emotional life of a young girl and how she copes with the impending death of her twin brother is the wisp of narrative that underpins writer-director Kamila Andini’s The Seen and Unseen, the follow-up to the filmmaker’s first equally insightful award-winner, The Mirror Never Lies. An exemplar of visual storytelling, Unseen also gives voice to the frequently voiceless: children, and girls in particular, and their emotional lives. The film’s languid pace and immersion in the sights and sounds of nature — wind, water, rustling leaves, insects — will draw immediate comparisons to Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Palme d’Or winner...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Busan: Hirokazu Kore-eda Boards ‘Ten Years Japan’ Spinoff

Busan: Hirokazu Kore-eda Boards ‘Ten Years Japan’ Spinoff
Iconic Japanese auteur Hirokazu Kore-eda has come on board as executive producer of “Ten Years Japan,” a spinoff of 2015’s Hong Kong indie hit “Ten Years.”

The original “Ten Years” movie was a low-budget omnibus film in which five young directors envisaged how Hong Kong would have changed 10 years into the future. Three new spinoffs, in Japan, Taiwan and Thailand, will use similar principals to deliver a trio of collective features made by up-and-coming directors. All three features will be sold by Hong Kong’s Golden Scene company.

“The idea of carrying on the spirit of the original Hong Kong film by trying to envision Japan 10 years from now was an intriguing one,” said Kore-eda. “However, I’m a little too old to participate as a young director, so I joined the production as a supporter.” His participation was announced at an event at the Busan Film Festival.

“We never imagined that ’10 Years’ would have such an
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Busan: Art-House Star Hirokazu​ ​Kore-eda​ ​Boards​ ​'Ten​ ​Years​ ​Japan' as​ ​Executive​ ​Producer

Busan: Art-House Star Hirokazu​ ​Kore-eda​ ​Boards​ ​'Ten​ ​Years​ ​Japan' as​ ​Executive​ ​Producer
The Japan adaptation of Hong Kong's groundbreaking film anthology, Ten Years, now has some local art-house star power behind it. 

Japanese director and Cannes favorite Hirokazu Kore-eda has signed on to executive produce his country's local version of the hit dystopian film series, joining Thai auteur and Palme d'Or winner Apichatpong Weerasethakul, who is directing one of the segments of the omnibus project set in his nation.

Ten Years, the original speculative film collection set in Hong Kong, was composed of five shorts by young local directors, each exploring individual visions of how there home city might change...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Busan: Ray Yeung Opens Closet With New Film at Asian Project Market

Writer/director Ray Yeung was reading about Hong Kong men in the 60-70 age group that were married and in the closet and decided to interview some of them. The interviews crystallized into the screenplay for “Suk Suk,” one of the projects vying for coin at the Busan Asian Project Market.

The film will follow two men in their twilight years who must choose between their love for each other and the families they have nurtured.

Yeung’s first feature, “Cut Sleeve Boys,” premiered at Rotterdam in 2006, won best feature at the Outfest Fusion Festival in Los Angeles and a best actor trophy for Chowee Leow at the Madrid Lgbt Film Festival. His second feature, “Front Cover,” won a slew of awards including best screenplay for Yeung at the FilmOut San Diego Lgbt Film Festival 2016, the audience award at the Boston Asian American Film Festival and the jury award for best domestic feature at the Outflix Film Festival
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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