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Scarecrow

We’re on the road again with a pair of eccentric new-age hobos, the kind that just can’t hack it in polite society. Gene Hackman and Al Pacino’s conflicting acting styles get a workout in Jerry Schatzberg’s tale of drifters cursed with iffy goals; Vilmos Zsigmond’s Panavision cinematography helped it earn a big prize at Cannes.

Scarecrow

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1973 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 112 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Gene Hackman, Al Pacino, Dorothy Tristan, Ann Wedgeworth, Richard Lynch, Eileen Brennan, Penny Allen, Richard Hackman, Al Cingolani, Rutanya Alda.

Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond

Film Editor: Evan Lottman, Craig McKay

Production Design: Albert Brenner

Original Music: Fred Myrow

Written by Garry Michael White

Produced by Robert M. Sherman

Directed by Jerry Schatzberg

Movie-wise, everything was up in the air in the early 1970s. The view from Westwood in West Los Angeles, then the place to go see a film,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Ann Wedgeworth, ‘Three’s Company’ Actress, Dead At 83

Ann Wedgeworth, the Tony Award-winning Broadway actress, best remembered by her extensive TV portfolio, including Three’s Company” and Evening Shade, died on November 16 at 83. Her daughter, Dianna Martin, confirmed the death but did not provide a cause. Wedgeworth was born in Abilene, Texas, on January 21, 1934. Her mother died when she was […]

Source: uInterview

The post Ann Wedgeworth, ‘Three’s Company’ Actress, Dead At 83 appeared first on uInterview.
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Ann Wedgeworth Dead: ‘Three’s Company’ Actress Dies At 83

  • ET Canada
Actress Ann Wedgeworth, who gained fame on film and Broadway before taking on the role of a flirty divorcee on “Three’s Company,” has died at age 83. Wedgeworth’s daughter Dianna Martin says her mother died Thursday in the New York area after a long illness. Wedgeworth won the 1978 Tony award for best featured actress in a play for […]
See full article at ET Canada »

Three’s Company Actress Ann Wedgeworth Dead at 83: Reports

On Thursday, Ann Wedgeworth — who was best known for her role on Three’s Company — died at the age of 83, according to multiple reports.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Diánna Martin — one of Wedgeworth’s daughter — said her mother passed away in a nursing home close to New York City following a long illness. Variety also reported that she died peacefully and surrounded by her family.

Before making a name for herself in TV and film, Wedgeworth performed on Broadway, winning a Tony Award for best performance by a featured actress in a play for her work in Neil Simon
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Ann Wedgeworth Dies: ‘Three’s Company,’ ‘Sweet Dreams’ Actress Was 83

Ann Wedgeworth Dies: ‘Three’s Company,’ ‘Sweet Dreams’ Actress Was 83
Ann Wedgeworth, a Tony Award-winning actress most widely known for roles on sitcoms Evening Shade and Three’s Company, died Thursday following a lengthy illness at a New York area nursing home, her family has announced. She was 83. Wedgeworth, who won a National Society of Film Critics Award for her tough but poignant performance in 1985’s Sweet Dreams – she played the mother of Jessica Lange’s Patsy Cline – won the 1978 Tony Award for best featured actress in a play for N…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Ann Wedgeworth Dies: ‘Three’s Company’, ‘Sweet Dreams’ Actress Was 83

Ann Wedgeworth Dies: ‘Three’s Company’, ‘Sweet Dreams’ Actress Was 83
Ann Wedgeworth, a Tony Award-winning actress most widely known for roles on sitcoms Evening Shade and Three’s Company, died Thursday following a lengthy illness at a New York area nursing home, her family has announced. She was 83. Wedgeworth, who won a National Society of Film Critics Award for her tough but poignant performance in 1985’s Sweet Dreams – she played the mother of Jessica Lange’s Patsy Cline – won the 1978 Tony Award for best featured actress in a play for N…
See full article at Deadline »

Link Therapy

• Criterion Close Isabelle Huppert makes her picks!

• i09 Netflix odd email phishing scam promotion of The Punisher (I received this too and was like hmmmm... clever but gross and no thank you)

• Gr8ter Days Ann Wedgeworth, a favorite of the National Society of Film Critics prizes in the late 70s and early 80s (Handle with Care, Sweet Dreams) and a Tony winner for a Chapter Two (which later became a film albeit without Wedgeworth) and a TV regular has died

Boy Culture It only took 50+ years but the Star Trek franchise just got its first gay kiss via Star Trek: Discovery thanks and out actors Anthony Rapp and Wilson Cruz

• Playbill Broadway hit Come From Away, which is about passengers stranded in a small Newfoundland town during 9/11, is going to get a film version with the Broadway director and writers transferring over

• Tracking Board Mahershala Ali and Carmen Ejogo (Yas!
See full article at FilmExperience »

Ann Wedgeworth, Actress in 'Scarecrow' and 'Three's Company,' Dies at 83

Ann Wedgeworth, the sexy actress with the whispery voice known for her underrated work in films including Scarecrow and Sweet Dreams and on a too-short stint with the sitcom Three's Company, has died. She was 83.

Wedgeworth, whose first husband was actor Rip Torn (The Larry Sanders Show), died Thursday after a long illness in a nursing home not far from her home in New York City, daughter Diánna Martin told The Hollywood Reporter. She died peacefully surrounded by family.

In 1978, the Texas native won the Tony Award for best featured actress in a play for her...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Ann Wedgeworth, Actress in 'Scarecrow' and 'Three's Company,' Dies at 83

Ann Wedgeworth, Actress in 'Scarecrow' and 'Three's Company,' Dies at 83
Ann Wedgeworth, the sexy actress with the whispery voice known for her underrated work in films including Scarecrow and Sweet Dreams and on a too-short stint with the sitcom Three's Company, has died. She was 83.

Wedgeworth, whose first husband was actor Rip Torn (The Larry Sanders Show), died Thursday after a long illness in a nursing home not far from her home in New York City, daughter Diánna Martin told The Hollywood Reporter. She died peacefully surrounded by family.

In 1978, the Texas native won the Tony Award for best featured actress in a play for her...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Smackdown '85: Anjelica, Amy, Meg, Margaret and Oprah

Presenting the Supporting Actresses of '85. It was all scandal all the time at this colorful party. There were three much gossiped about women (a mafia princess, a drunk promiscuous entertainer, and a delusional pregnant nun) and two stubborn women who were just Not having either the gossip or the abusive and cheating men around them. It was the about appreciating the color purple (Oprah & Margaret), seeing red (Amy & Meg), and embracing jet black comedy (Anjelica).

The Nominees 

from left to right: Avery, Huston, Madigan, Tilly, and Winfrey

Oscar celebrated newcomers in 1985 with a shortlist composed entirely of first timers. All five actresses were relatively inexperienced (as Oscar lists go) having made less than ten films each so no overdue conversations were to be had. One of them (Oprah Winfrey) was even making her film debut though the eventual winner (Anjelica Huston) was already Hollywood royalty, being the daughter of
See full article at FilmExperience »

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals
(See previous post: Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year.) On the evening of the Fourth of July, besides fireworks, fire hazards, and Yankee Doodle Dandy, if you're watching TCM in the U.S. and Canada, there's the following: Peter H. Hunt's 1776 (1972), a largely forgotten film musical based on the Broadway hit with music by Sherman Edwards. William Daniels, who was recently on TCM talking about 1776 and a couple of other movies (A Thousand Clowns, Dodsworth), has one of the key roles as John Adams. Howard Da Silva, blacklisted for over a decade after being named a communist during the House Un-American Committee hearings of the early 1950s (Robert Taylor was one who mentioned him in his testimony), plays Benjamin Franklin. Ken Howard is Thomas Jefferson, a role he would reprise in John Huston's 1976 short Independence. (In the short, Pat Hingle was cast as John Adams; Eli Wallach was Benjamin Franklin.) Warner
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Best Baseball Movies

In the midst of March Madness and with the Kentucky Derby around the corner, the first pitch of baseball season is almost here.

A quote from Field Of Dreams best describes America’s national pastime, “The one constant throughout the years has been baseball.”

To mark the start of the 2016 season, here’s our list of the Best Baseball movies.

The Bad News Bears

Considered by some to be the best baseball movie ever, the film celebrates its 40th anniversary this month (April 7, 1976). In an article from the NY Daily News, one line reads, “It is a movie that someone like the late Philip Seymour Hoffman called his favorite, and one which resonates on many levels today, with all different generations.”

Who are we to argue with greatness?

After skewering all-American subjects such as politics (The Candidate) and beauty pageants (Smile), director Michael Ritchie naturally set his sights on the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

It’s Opening Week: Best Baseball Movies

Is this heaven? Nope, it’s Opening Week.

Recently Mlb rounded up a group of players to recite, word for word, James Earl Jones’ famous “people will come, Ray” speech from Field Of Dreams.

Wamg declares America’s national pastime, Baseball, to be the official sport of movie fans everywhere. As Brad Pitt said in Moneyball, “How can you not be romantic about Baseball?”

It all started Sunday night with the Cardinals at the Cubs with St. Louis winning 3 to 0.

To celebrate the first pitch of Opening Week, here’s our list of the best Baseball movies.

The Rookie

One of the best baseball biopics to come along over the years, The Rookie, starring Dennis Quaid, tells the true story of Jim Morris, a man who finally gets a shot at his lifelong dream-pitching in the big leagues. A high school science teacher/baseball coach, Morris’ players make a bet with him:if they win district,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Film-makers must trust the audience

Scarecrow and The King of Marvin Gardens – quirky, unstylised films made in the 60s and 70s that refused to smooth their rough edges. This bravery, Adam Mars-Jones argues, is what film-makers are missing today

The label "independent film" doesn't mean what it once did, and the Sundance festival is part of the reason. The moment aspiring film-makers realised there was a potential shortcut to distribution and acclaim, they started smoothing off their rough edges – consciously or without even noticing – or at least they began to stylise themselves. Either way, the overall effect of the festival has not been to promote individuality but to erode it. So it's a mild beneficial shock to watch two American films of the early 1970s on re-release – not because they're masterpieces, exactly, but because they give the flavour of a different set of assumptions.

Scarecrow, directed by Jerry Schatzberg, won a prize at Cannes in
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Best Baseball Movies To See Before The World Series

“The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: it’s a part of our past, Ray. It reminds us of all that once was good and it could be again.” – Field Of Dreams.

No truer words were ever spoken about America’s Pastime. Baseball began this past Spring with 30 teams vying for the chance to become World Champions and now it’s been decided. The San Francisco Giants and Detroit Tigers will play ball in the 2012 World Series. Before the final hurrah of nine innings, stats, bases and 3 strikes you’re out, Wamg has compiled a list of the Best Baseball Movies. Did we leave any in the dugout or are there some that should be sent to the showers?
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Strand tethered to quirky 'Hawk'

TORONTO -- Strand Releasing has nabbed all North American rights to Julian Goldberger's The Hawk Is Dying, starring Paul Giamatti, Michelle Williams and Michael Pitt. The film, which premiered in January at the Sundance Film Festival and was a selection for the Directors' Fortnight sidebar at May's Festival de Cannes, is slated for a platform release in the spring. In the quirky drama from Antidote Films, Oscar nominee Giamatti (Sideways) stars as a Florida auto upholsterer who attempts to liven up his humdrum life by taming a wild hawk. He lives with an overweight sister (Ann Wedgeworth) and an autistic nephew (Pitt) and gets involved with an on-again/off-again girlfriend (Williams) who might be involved in the death of one of the characters.

Strand tethered to quirky 'Hawk'

TORONTO -- Strand Releasing has nabbed all North American rights to Julian Goldberger's The Hawk Is Dying, starring Paul Giamatti, Michelle Williams and Michael Pitt. The film, which premiered in January at the Sundance Film Festival and was a selection for the Directors' Fortnight sidebar at May's Festival de Cannes, is slated for a platform release in the spring. In the quirky drama from Antidote Films, Oscar nominee Giamatti (Sideways) stars as a Florida auto upholsterer who attempts to liven up his humdrum life by taming a wild hawk. He lives with an overweight sister (Ann Wedgeworth) and an autistic nephew (Pitt) and gets involved with an on-again/off-again girlfriend (Williams) who might be involved in the death of one of the characters.

Hawk is Dying

PARK CITY - Based on a 1973 novel by Southern writer Harry Crews, "The Hawk Is Dying" hopefully made more sense as a book than it does as a movie. Loaded with obtuse symbolism, the film is not only hard to understand, it isn't much fun trying to figure it out. Aside from devotees of the novel, commercial prospects for this literary effort are very slim.

Strong cast, top-lined by Paul Giamatti, is largely wasted on questionable material, written and directed by Julian Goldberger. Giamatti plays George Gattling, a Gainesville, Fla. owner of a car upholstery shop whose passion in life is capturing hawks in the wild and training them. Unfortunately, he hasn't had much luck and his earlier birds have died on him.

George lives with his obese sister (Ann Wedgeworth) and his mentally challenged nephew Fred Michael Pitt). With Fred's help, George traps a unique red-tailed hawk in a last ditch attempt to save his manhood and redeem himself, or something like that. But more misfortune befalls him when Fred drowns in his waterbed. This is tragic, not funny, and George goes on a rampage trying to train the bird.

Also involved in this mess is his sometime girlfriend Betty (Michelle Williams), who may or may not have been responsible for Fred's death. It's all murky and fraught with angst. In any case, George goes on a fast until he can get the hawk to eat, and as you might imagine, he has some pretty strange visions after going five days without food. Fred appears and tells him cryptically, "You never have", to which George responds, "No, I never have". And if you can make head or tale of that, this is your kind of movie.

The film, nicely shot by Bobby Bukowski, does have its moments of visual splendor in the fields of Florida, and some of the bird behavior is fascinating. And it is interesting to watch a huffing and puffing Giamatti work in high gear-to a point. Williams does her usual stellar work, as well, if only her character were not so enigmatic. Presumably, this all worked better on the page than it does on the screen.

THE HAWK IS DYING

Antidote Films

This Is That Productions

Credits:

Director: Julian Goldberger, based on the novel by Harry Crews

Writer: Goldberger

Producers: Jeffrey Levy-Hinte, Mary Jane Skalski

Executive producers: Ted Hope, Corbin Day, Jeanne Levy-Hinte

Director of photography: Bobby Bukowski

Production designer: Judy Becker

Music: Jonathan Goldberger

Costume designer: April Napier

Editor: Affonso Goncalves.

Cast:

George Gattling: Paul Giamatti

Betty: Michelle Williams

Fred: Michael Pitt

Billy Bob: Robert Wisdom

Precious: Rusty Schwimmer

Ma Gattling: Ann Wedgeworth

No MPAA Rating

Film review: 'The Whole Wide World'

Film review: 'The Whole Wide World'
EAST HAMPTON, N.Y. -- One of the strangest cinematic love stories in recent memory, "The Whole Wide World" has the advantage of being true. An account of the lengthy and bizarre relationship between famous pulp-fiction writer Robert E. Howard ("Conan the Barbarian", "Red Sonja") and a Texas schoolteacher named Novalyne Price, the film boasts outstanding performances by Vincent D'Onofrio and rising star Renee Zellweger. Recently shown at the Hamptons International Film Festival, the film will be released commercially by Sony Pictures Classics, which will need to handle this special item with kid gloves.

Howard, a highly idiosyncratic figure, lived with his parents in the small town of Cross Plains, Texas, in the 1930s, churning out fantasy, adventure and science-fiction tales at a ferocious pace. They appeared in various magazines specializing in pulp fiction, including Weird Tales and Amazing Stories. For several years, he was involved in an on-again, off-again relationship with the young teacher. Although their relationship ended with his death by suicide in 1936 (he was only 30), she wrote about it decades later in an acclaimed memoir, "One Who Walked Alone", upon which this movie is based.

Howard was an anti-social loner who was obsessed with his mother (played by Ann Wedgeworth) and who had the habit of loudly acting out his stories while writing them; he was considered more than a little odd by the townspeople. But he was endlessly fascinating to Novalyne, who aspired to be a writer herself. Their unconventional relationship, in which she wins his love but is unable to domesticate him or cure him of his demons, is detailed in Michael Scott Myers' episodic screenplay.

D'Onofrio, who has proved himself to be an intensely charismatic, highly physical and chameleon-like actor, is riveting as Howard. He beautifully expresses the writer's dual personalities: the socially inadequate, shy, fumbling gentleman and the blustery, confident figure who liked to imagine himself as his favorite character, Conan. Zellweger, who has the much less flashy role, is greatly impressive as Novalyne, who has more than a few contradictions of her own. Shifting effortlessly between the role's comic and more dramatic demands, she demonstrates a charm and range that bodes well for her upcoming co-starring role with Tom Cruise in "Jerry Maguire". Myers' screenplay is admirably subtle, although it does meander a bit too long in its storytelling; the film could benefit from some trimming. Dan Ireland's direction skillfully establishes the small-town Texas atmosphere and beautifully captures the nuances of an emotionally complex story.

THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD

A Sony Pictures Classics release

Presented by the Kushner-Locke Co.

in association with Cineville

Director Dan Ireland

Screenplay Michael Scott Myers

Executive producers Donald Kushner,

Peter Locke, Gregory Cascanate

Co-executive producer Robert Strauss

Producers Carl-Jan Colpaert, Dan Ireland,

Vincent D'Onofrio, Kevin Reidy

Director of photography Claudio Rocha

Editor Luis Colina

Music Hans Zimmer

Color/stereo

Cast:

Robert E. Howard Vincent D'Onofrio

Novalyne Price Renee Zellweger

Mrs. Howard Ann Wedgeworth

Dr. Howard Harve Presnell

Clyde Benjamin Mouton

Running time -- 111 minutes

MPAA rating: PG

See also

Credited With | External Sites