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Film Review: ‘Phantom Thread’

Film Review: ‘Phantom Thread’
Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis), the svelte and smoldering middle-aged British fashion designer at the heart of Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread,” is a man who seems to have everything he wants. He lives in a splendid five-story London townhouse with walls the color of cream, and he works there too, starting early, sitting with his tea and pastries as he does the day’s sketches, already possessed by his reverent labor. He’s a dressmaker who works with the fervor of an artist — dreaming, obsessing, perfecting. At night he sips martinis at parties and restaurants, rubbing shoulders with the countesses and wealthy London ladies who are his clients, and he’s also a devoted serial womanizer who falls for — and discards — one comely model muse after another. (As the film opens, his current flame is flickering out.) “Phantom Thread” is set in 1955, but Reynolds, in his posh and pampered upper-crust way, has the air
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rev Up Your Engines - the Baby Driver Sequel Basically Has a Green Light

This Summer, Baby Driver became somewhat of a surprise cultural smash. Packing in high-octane thrills and car chases with a truly exceptional soundtrack, the film earned nearly a quarter billion at the box office and landed an impressive 93 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. Suffice it to say, you'd be hard-pressed to find someone who doesn't want a sequel. Luckily for all of us, the wheels began turning quite a while ago to deliver us more Baby. Here's what we've heard. 1. Sony Has Reportedly Wanted a Sequel For a While According to The Hollywood Reporter, Sony approached director Edgar Wright for a sequel shortly after the movie opened. It helped that the filmed earned nearly $30 million in its first weekend at the box office, nearly recuperating the entire estimated budget of $34 million. Also, I mean, it boasts a treasure trove of positive reviews and even praise from other iconic filmmakers (like, for example,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

John Waters’ Top 10 Films Of 2017 Includes ‘Baby Driver,’ ‘Nocturama’ & ‘Lady Macbeth’

It’s the time of year when every cinephile sifts through the sands of their viewing lists, and comes up with their top ten list of the year. Frankly, a lot of lists echo each other, with the same awards season fare switched around. However, John Waters‘ list is always such a treat because, a true and adventurous cinephile, he celebrates films that entertain and take big risks.

Nowhere is that more evident than in this Best Films Of 2017 roundup for Artforum (via First Showing).

Continue reading John Waters’ Top 10 Films Of 2017 Includes ‘Baby Driver,’ ‘Nocturama’ & ‘Lady Macbeth’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

John Waters Reveals His Top 10 Films of 2017 - 'Baby Driver' Takes #1

It's that time again! With the end of the year approaching, everyone begins revealing their own Top 10 best of the year lists. One of our favorite lists that kicks off this time is from filmmaker John Waters' - his Top 10 favorite films from this year. For 2017, Waters has chosen yet another (expected) eclectic mix of films, lead by Edgar Wright's musical action thriller Baby Driver (which is not really an eclectic choice) and ending with the biopic about the Finnish man who introduced kinky leather fashion to the gay world, Tom of Finland (watch the trailer). I always like hearing about Waters' favorites because he has such unique taste. Plus it's a good way to start the discussion about everyone's favorites as we get closer to the end of the year. Waters includes a short one/two-sentence explanation with each pick, so head to ArtForum to read all
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

John Waters’ Top 10 Films of 2017 Includes ‘Nocturama,’ ‘Baby Driver,’ and ‘Lady Macbeth’

The onslaught of best-of-the-year lists from guilds and critics groups have only just begun, but one of the few of genuine interest each year comes from a single person: the wonderfully eccentric director John Waters, whose eclectic tastes always includes a mix of the unexpected and underseen.

Topping his list this year is Edgar Wright’s action-romance Baby Driver, which was a bright spot this past summer. Also named is one of the best-directed films of the year—and one that should be getting more love in year-end wrap-ups—Bertrand Bonello’s uncompromising Nocturama. Waters also includes a pair of Amazon Studios releases: Wonderstruck and Wonder Wheel, as well as an early 2018 release we’re looking forward to, The Strange Ones.

Check out the list below courtesy of Chaos Reigns.

1. Baby Driver (Edgar Wright)

2. I, Olga Hepnarová (Tomáš Weinreb & Petr Kazda)

3. The Strange Ones (Christopher Radcliff & Lauren Wolkstein)

4. Nocturama (Bertrand Bonello
See full article at The Film Stage »

Patty Hearst Turns from Heiress to Revolutionary and Then Back in New Archival Documentary

Patty Hearst Turns from Heiress to Revolutionary and Then Back in New Archival Documentary
Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst Shaw occasionally creeps into the headlines these days as a champion show dog trainer, a figure of enduring curiosity with a past string of minor roles as an actress on TV and in the kitschy films of director John Waters.

But for a heightened moment in the mid-1970s, Patty Hearst, as she was then known, was the central figure in a San Francisco Bay area kidnapping and crime spree that intersected with domestic terrorism during a chaotic moment in American politics and culture, producing iconic images of the era and landing her in prison for 22 months after she embraced,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

James Ivory receives sole credit for Call Me By Your Name screenplay by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-11-19 19:33:03

John Waters gets a smile from James Ivory who will now be credited as the sole screenwriter of Call Me By Your Name Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In an arbitration hearing initiated by James Ivory, The Writers Guild of America has acknowledged that he be credited as the sole screenwriter of Luca Guadagnino's Call Me By Your Name (Chiamami Con Il Tuo Nome) for the work he did on the adaptation of André Aciman's novel.

Elio (Timothée Chalamet) with Oliver (Armie Hammer)

At the New York Film Festival press conference last month Luca Guadagnino gave some background on how he took over to become director from James Ivory.

He had been approached by Peter Spears, who, together with Howard Rosenman was one of the original producers. They kept "nurturing this movie until now," he said and were developing the script from the book by Aciman with Ivory. "Because the
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Why Freddy Got Fingered Isn't the Bomb Everyone Remembers

Why Freddy Got Fingered Isn't the Bomb Everyone Remembers
At the height of his fame, Tom Green was allowed to make his first standalone movie as a leading man. But by all accounts, 2001's Freddy Got Fingered was a substantial bomb, and decimated his future in film. Case in point, he hasn't been in one for a long while. But as Tom Green sees it, the movie didn't bomb. In fact, according to him, it was a financial success and could have done a lot better in theaters had it not be rated R. He has his own theory on why the numbers weren't bigger. He places the blame on Crocodile Dundee.

People probably haven't been thinking much about Freddy Got Fingered. It enjoys its own limited cult cache, and it made the news in early 2016, when a man was arrested for not returning his VHS rental of the asinine comedy after 14 years. But the movie has pretty much
See full article at MovieWeb »

Doc NYC Review: ‘The Pink House,’ Capturing an Australian Brothel, is John Waters Meets Mike Leigh

In Kalgoorlie, Australia, once a booming town, men used to come to pick the gold from the hills until the market took a nosedive leading to a negative effect on the local economy that’s discussed through the lens of one industry, the oldest profession in the world. Sure, the prim and proper Madame Carmel, three times a widower, blames the influx of Asian immigrants advertising in the local paper and not Tinder and the normalization of one-night stands. Her local employee is Bj, a 45-year-old sex worker who started in the industry for the wrong reasons: to support her drug habit, which leads her down a dark path as The Pink House strays into the wild and off the reservation.

Inspired by the Maysles’ Grey Gardens, Sascha Ettinger Epstein’s lens focuses mostly on its two leads living and working together. Carmel, a proper, energetic woman of 80, purchases the historic Questa Casa,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Tonight on The A.V. Club Hosted By John Teti: Paul Reiser

This week on The A.V. Club Hosted By John Teti, John Waters drops by our magic screen to give us his two cents on this week’s headlines and to tell us why he won’t be dressing up on Halloween. Later in the show, A.V. Club assistant editor Danette Chavez tells the uninitiated how to get into Star Trek in our latest…

Read more...
See full article at The AV Club »

‘Bpm (Beats Per Minute)’ Director and Stars on Sex, Realism, and the Fluidity of Cinema

Act up! Fight back! Fight AIDS!

You don’t hear the United States branch of Act Up’s (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) famous slogan in Robin Campillo’s Bpm (Beats Per Minute), but its ethos courses through the film’s powerful love story.

Campillo spent his late twenties debating, organizing, and protesting as a member of Act Up Paris. A quarter of a century later he’s telling a fictionalized account of their story. Bpm won the Grand Prix award at the Cannes Film Festival in May and swept through the New York Film Festival earlier this month, receiving standing ovations at both screenings.

The film, which is France’s Oscar entry, excels at rooting history in a relatable love story between Sean (Nahuel Pérez Biscayart), a firebrand Act Up activist living with the virus and Nathan (Arnaud Valois), a latecomer to the movement who ignored the plague throughout the 1980s.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Horror Highlights: New Splathouse Podcast Episode, Sightings Q&A, Aliens: Zone Of Silence, Contest from Comet TV, Mansfield 66/67, Zombie Doctor, Have You Any Fear?

  • DailyDead
The Splathouse podcast team heads to Haddonfield with their new episode on Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, and you can listen to it in today's Horror Highlights. We also have a Q&A with the writer/director of Sightings, a new prize pack contest from our friends at Comet TV, a trailer for Aliens: Zone of Silence, release details and a trailer for the stranger than fiction documentary Mansfield 66/67, a look at Line Webtoon's horror anthology comic series, and details on the Kickstarter campaign for the Zombie Doctor tabletop game.

Listen to a New Episode of the Splathouse Podcast: From Splathouse: "One, two, Chucky’s coming for you, pinhead!

This week the goobs at Splathouse watched Halloween: The Curse Of Michael Myers (1995) and just barely survived! Pervy Paul (Don’t Call Me Stephen) Rudd, culty runes/ruins/ruse, miraculous household appliances, and the lack of any coherency: This movie has it all!
See full article at DailyDead »

Kingsman: The Golden Circle review: Dir. Matthew Vaughn (2017)

Kingsman The Golden Circle review: Matthew Vaughn aims this A-list heavy action/comedy/adventure at the screen, a sequel to 2015’s runaway success Kingsman: The Secret Service.

Kingsman The Golden Circle review by Paul Heath.

Kingsman The Golden Circle review

There’s an indication as to whether a film will be any good or not, in my own books anyway, that if it features any kind of song written or performed by Elton John, it will be a runaway success; a sure-fire hit, and most of all, an enjoyable journey. With Kingsman: The Golden Circle, the sequel to 2015’s runaway success Kingsman: The Secret Service, Matthew Vaughn and co-writer Jane Goldman have gone a step further and put the rock-god into the film – his first acting role since 1997’s Spiceworld.

My quality indicator has finally been proven to be wrong.

This is not to say that Kingsman: The Golden Circle
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Sir Elton John To Be Honored At Elton John AIDS Foundation New York Fall Gala

On Tuesday, November 7, 2017, the Elton John AIDS Foundation (Ejaf) will host its annual New York Fall Gala at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City.

This year’s gala commemorates the Foundation’s 25th year and honors Founder Sir Elton John. President Bill Clinton, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, Sharon Stone, and others will pay tribute to Elton John’s achievements as a philanthropist and humanitarian. The legendary Aretha Franklin will be the special musical guest, along with performances by violinist Joshua Bell and Broadway’s The Lion King, featuring Heather Headley. Neil Patrick Harris will host the event.

“Elton’s philanthropic endeavors and activism for human rights and the arts have inspired millions and made a positive difference in people’s lives around the world,” said Ejaf Chairman David Furnish. “But without a doubt, Elton’s greatest contribution as a humanitarian is his 25-year commitment to
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Manson Girl Leslie Van Houten and John Waters: An Unlikely Friendship

  • The Wrap
Manson Girl Leslie Van Houten and John Waters: An Unlikely Friendship
Leslie Van Houten, the youngest member of Charles Manson’s cult, has been granted parole and could be released from prison if she is allowed to do so by California Gov. Jerry Brown. One of the people hoping for that release is famed transgressive filmmaker John Waters, who formed an unlikely friendship with Van Houten more than 30 years ago. In 2009, Waters wrote a five-part essay series titled “Leslie Van Houten: A Friendship,” in which he discussed at length how he met and bonded with the former death row inmate and why he believes she should be set free. “She looks.
See full article at The Wrap »

Faster Pussycat Kill Kill! Screening at Schlafly Bottleworks August 2nd

Russ Meyer’s Faster Pussycat Kill Kill! screens Wednesday, August 2nd at 8pm at Schlafly Bottleworks Restaurant and Bar (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143) as part of Webster University’s Award-Winning Strange Brew Film Series. The film will be followed by an interview with its star Tura Satana that was conducted on-stage at the Way Out Club in St. Louis in October of 2008. Admission is $5

In 1953 Playboy magazine debuted and one of its first centerfold photographers was Russ Meyer, who had been a combat photographer in WWII. Meyer had a knack, and a passion, for photographing gorgeous, busty women and felt that the gals in the nudist camp movies that were popular in the ‘50s were far too plain-looking for his tastes. In 1959, Meyer scraped together $24,000 and made The Immoral Mr. Teas, a quaint, colorful, and cartoonish movie about a nerdy fellow whose life is constantly interrupted by
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Russ Meyer’s Faster Pussycat Kill Kill! Screening at Schlafly Bottleworks August 2nd

Russ Meyer’s Faster Pussycat Kill Kill! screens Wednesday, August 2nd at 8pm at Schlafly Bottleworks Restaurant and Bar (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143) as part of Webster University’s Award-Winning Strange Brew Film Series. The film will be followed by an interview with its star Tura Satana that was conducted on-stage at the Way Out Club in St. Louis in October of 2008. Admission is $5

In 1953 Playboy magazine debuted and one of its first centerfold photographers was Russ Meyer, who had been a combat photographer in WWII. Meyer had a knack, and a passion, for photographing gorgeous, busty women and felt that the gals in the nudist camp movies that were popular in the ‘50s were far too plain-looking for his tastes. In 1959, Meyer scraped together $24,000 and made The Immoral Mr. Teas, a quaint, colorful, and cartoonish movie about a nerdy fellow whose life is constantly interrupted by
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

"Difficult People" Returns Soon!

Chris here, pumped for the return of one of my favorites. Have you caught up to the delightfully inappropriate Diffifult People on Hulu? You have a few weeks to do so before the third season arrives on August 8.

The comedy series stars Julie Klausner and Billy Eichner as two acid besties trying to get ahead in entertainment and usually screwing themselves over with their own potty-mouthed self-absorption. Imagine The Mary Tyler Moore Show as told John Waters and you get pretty close to its sweetly caustic hilarity. The show has gotten most of its hype from its super cool and unexpected lineup of guest stars, but what really makes it special is the no-filter friendship at its core. That friendship you have where you can say literally any bitter truth and laugh at its stupidity? No pair on television embodies that better than Julie and Billy.

Take a look at the coming farce!
See full article at FilmExperience »

How George Romero’s Semi-Autobiographical Labor of Love ‘Knightriders’ Gave Him the Independence He Wanted So Badly

How George Romero’s Semi-Autobiographical Labor of Love ‘Knightriders’ Gave Him the Independence He Wanted So Badly
Spending a few days watching the shooting of “Knightriders,” George A. Romero’s follow-up to his breakout 1978 sequel “Dawn of the Dead,” was something I’ll never forget. Basically, Pittsburgh was to Romero as Baltimore was to John Waters: the local auteur’s home and sprawling movie set. Romero collected a loyal cast and crew family to help him with every movie, from his wife Christine Forrest to actor and makeup savant Tom Savini.

“Knightriders” was Romero’s labor of love, a semi-autobiographical, non-horror story about a Renaissance troupe led by Billy, a King Arthur figure played by Ed Harris in his first leading role. In the movie Billy and his Queen (Amy Ingersoll) lead a troupe who mount tournaments for motorcycle-riding jousting knights in armor. But Billy has trouble keeping the real world –promoters, fans and money concerns — from intruding on their Utopia, as the motorcycle riders roar past McDonald’s Golden Arches.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

How George Romero’s Semi-Autobiographical Labor of Love ‘Knightriders’ Gave Him the Independence He Wanted So Badly

How George Romero’s Semi-Autobiographical Labor of Love ‘Knightriders’ Gave Him the Independence He Wanted So Badly
Spending a few days watching the shooting of “Knightriders,” George A. Romero’s follow-up to his breakout 1978 sequel “Dawn of the Dead,” was something I’ll never forget. Basically, Pittsburgh was to Romero as Baltimore was to John Waters: the local auteur’s home and sprawling movie set. Romero collected a loyal cast and crew family to help him with every movie, from his wife Christine Forrest to actor and makeup savant Tom Savini.

“Knightriders” was Romero’s labor of love, a semi-autobiographical, non-horror story about a Renaissance troupe led by Billy, a King Arthur figure played by Ed Harris in his first leading role. In the movie Billy and his Queen (Amy Ingersoll) lead a troupe who mount tournaments for motorcycle-riding jousting knights in armor. But Billy has trouble keeping the real world –promoters, fans and money concerns — from intruding on their Utopia, as the motorcycle riders roar past McDonald’s Golden Arches.
See full article at Indiewire »
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