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‘Hall of Mirrors’: Edward Jay Epstein on the Trail of Edward Snowden

‘Hall of Mirrors’: Edward Jay Epstein on the Trail of Edward Snowden
From the Kennedy Assassination to Edward Snowden, Edward Jay Epstein has built a career out of challenging the conventional wisdom. The author of several seminal works of investigative journalism is the subject of an arresting new documentary, “Hall of Mirrors,” which premiered at the New York Film Festival this month. It is looking for distribution. The film marks the directing debut of sisters Ena and Ines Talakic, and serves as both a retrospective of Epstein’s fascinating career and a memorial to a type of reporting that has largely fallen out of favor in an era of clickbait headlines.

“He’s just someone who asks basic questions and gets full access to the most incredible people,” said Ines Talakic. “He takes his time and he digs deep.”

That’s been a hallmark of Epstein’s career. As an undergraduate at Cornell he managed to speak to nearly every member of the Warren Commission save for Chief Justice Earl Warren. His resulting
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Looking back at Oliver Stone's JFK

Robert Keeling Apr 19, 2017

Kevin Costner headlined an all-star cast in Oliver Stone's JFK. It was a film that led to an act of Congress being passed...

Oliver Stone’s epic conspiracy-thriller JFK, surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy and the case brought about by New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison in relation to his murder, was released in 1991 to an astonishing level of critical backlash. Even before JFK arrived in theatres it was being pilloried and attacked by many in the media. The attacks were kick-started by Washington Post correspondent George Lardner, an investigative reporter who wrote a piece called On the Set: Dallas In Wonderland; How Oliver Stone’s Version Of The Kennedy Assassination Exploits The Edge Of Paranoia, which was actually based solely on a leaked copy of Stone’s first draft of the script.

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See full article at Den of Geek »

Richard and Mildred Loving: The Real-Life Story of the Couple in the Buzzy Film

With a perfect last name amid imperfect circumstances, Richard and Mildred Loving made history when their fight for the state of Virginia to recognize their interracial marriage made it all the way to the Supreme Court in 1967.

Now, their love story is making headlines again, with a screen adaptation of their odyssey, simply titled Loving, generating early Oscar buzz after earning rave reviews in this year’s awards circuit.

But just who were Richard and Mildred Loving (portrayed onscreen by Australian actor Joel Edgerton and Ethiopian-born Ruth Negga)? Here are five things to know about the reluctant civil rights heroes
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Tiff Movie Review: Loving

Great American stories of triumph over adversity, of rising above circumstances, beg to be made into sprawling epics. But too often filmmakers give into temptation and turn bombastic even the mundane, overblowing the ordinary into Hollywood-style spectacle for the benefit of ticket sales or award nominations. Made amid this cacophony, the crowning achievement of Loving is its steadfast refusal to thread into extravagance or to resort to stately speeches and grand pronunciations to capture its audience.

Loving is instead a modest movie about quiet suffering and determined resistance, about victory through perseverance. In conveying the story in understated tones, director Jeff Nichols pays the ultimate homage to his protagonists. Richard Loving and his wife Mildred were humble people—they lived in rural Virginia in the 1950s and wanted only a simple family life devoted to the other. They also happened to be a white man and a black woman, at
See full article at LRM Online »

The Real Story of Richard and Mildred Loving - the Interracial Couple Who Fought for Their Right to Wed and Inspired the Cannes Film Already Earning Oscar Buzz

  • PEOPLE.com
With a perfect last name amid imperfect circumstances, Richard and Mildred Loving made history when their fight for the state of Virginia to recognize their interracial marriage made it all the way to the Supreme Court in 1967. Now, their love story is making headlines again, with a screen adaptation of their odyssey, simply titled Loving, garnering rave reviews at Cannes - and generating early Oscar buzz. But just who were Richard and Mildred Loving (portrayed onscreen by Australian actor Joel Edgerton and Ethiopian-born Ruth Negga)? Read on to learn more: 1. They Were Arrested in Their Bedroom Five Weeks After Their
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Real Story Behind Richard and Mildred Loving - the Interracial Couple Behind the Cannes Film Already Earning Oscar Buzz

  • PEOPLE.com
With a perfect last name amid imperfect circumstances, Richard and Mildred Loving made history when their fight for the state of Virginia to recognize their interracial marriage made it all the way to the Supreme Court in 1967. Now, their love story is making headlines again, with a screen adaptation of their odyssey, simply titled Loving, garnering rave reviews at Cannes - and generating early Oscar buzz. But just who were Richard and Mildred Loving (portrayed onscreen by Australian actor Joel Edgerton and Ethiopian-born Ruth Negga)? Read on to learn more: 1. They Were Arrested in Their Bedroom Five Weeks After Their
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Stone (Thrillingly) Assassinates Truth While Investigating Kennedy Assassination

'JFK' movie with Kevin Costner as Jim Garrison 'JFK' assassination movie: Gripping political drama gives added meaning to 'Rewriting History' If it's an Oliver Stone film, it must be bombastic, sentimental, clunky, and controversial. With the exception of "clunky," JFK is all of the above. It is also riveting, earnest, dishonest, moving, irritating, paranoid, and, more frequently than one might expect, outright brilliant. In sum, Oliver Stone's 1991 political thriller about a determined district attorney's investigation of the assassination of U.S. president John F. Kennedy is a slick piece of propaganda that mostly works both dramatically and cinematically. If only some of the facts hadn't gotten trampled on the way to film illustriousness. With the exception of John Williams' overemphatic score – Oliver Stone films need anything but overemphasis – JFK's technical and artistic details are put in place to extraordinary effect. Joe Hutshing and Pietro Scalia's editing
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Let Justice Be Done Though The Heavens Fall: A Look Back At Oliver Stone’s ‘JFK’

Friday November 22nd, 1963. Dallas, Texas. 12.30 Cst.

Whether you’re a native of the United States or not, that date and location remains one of history’s blackest days. As three shots rang out as a jubilant crowd watched on as President John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s motorcade slowly turned onto Dealey Plaza, not one person could have been prepared for what happened that very day…

As a devastated nation watched on in horror as the news unfolded that their beloved ”Jack” was being rushed to Parkland Hospital in a vain attempt to save him, 30 minutes later his death was confirmed. A first bullet in the throat, a second in the upper part of his back, with the fatal shot taking a portion of skull and brain. He died younger than any Us President to date and like Abraham Lincoln (16th President), James A. Garfield (the 20th President) and William McKinley (25th President) before him,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Posthumous Release of Ted Kennedy Memoir

The late Senator Edward Kennedy candidly speaks of the demons that contributed to his long and fascinating life and political career. Read on for excerpts prior to the book's publication. In his 532-page memoir titled "True Compass," already obtained by the New York Times, Kennedy opens up about his remorse for the infamous Chappaquiddick car accident in 1969. He calls his leaving the scene of the accident "inexcusable" and admits he lived with guilt associated with it for decades to follow. On July 18, 1969, Kennedy drove a car off a bridge into a pond. He swam to safety, leaving Mary Jo Kopechne in the car to drown. She was found 10 hours later. The life of Kennedy has been marked by many family tragedies including the assassination of his brother, President John F. Kennedy, in 1963. Following the investigation, he had a full briefing by Earl Warren, the chief justice, and says he "was satisfied then,
See full article at The Insider »

Kennedy memoir reveals remorse over Chappaquiddick

In a posthumous memoir, Massachusetts Sen. Edward M. Kennedy writes of fear and remorse surrounding the fateful events on Chappaquiddick Island in 1969, when his car accident left a woman dead, and says he accepted the finding that a lone gunman assassinated his brother President John F. Kennedy.The memoir, "True Compass," is to be published Sept. 14 by Twelve, a division of the Hachette book group. The 532-page book was obtained early by The New York Times.In it, Kennedy says his actions on Chappaquiddick on July 18, 1969, were "inexcusable." He says he was afraid and "made terrible decisions" and had to live with the guilt for more than four decades.Kennedy drove off a bridge into a pond. He swam to safety, leaving Mary Jo Kopechne in the car.Kopechne, a worker with slain Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's campaign, was found dead in the
See full article at Filmicafe »

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