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Kenneth Branagh to Return in Murder on the Orient Express Sequel

  • MovieWeb
Kenneth Branagh to Return in Murder on the Orient Express Sequel
20th Century Fox is moving forward with a sequel to the Agatha Christie adaptation Murder on the Orient Express, entitled Death On the Nile. The studio is bringing back Murder on the Orient Express writer Michael Green to pen the script. While there is no deal in place as of yet for filmmaker/star Kenneth Branagh, he is expected to return to the director's chair, while also coming back to star as detective Hercule Poirot. Whether Poirot's epic mustache also returns remains to be seen, but that seems likely as well.

Death on the Nile was first published in 1937, three years after Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express was published. The story finds Hercule Poirot on vacation in Cairo, Egypt, where he becomes entangled in a deadly love triangle. While Poirot is the only character from Murder on the Orient Express to cross over, the story features the same
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Fox Developing ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ Sequel ‘Death on the Nile’

Fox Developing ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ Sequel ‘Death on the Nile’
Twentieth Century Fox Film is working on a follow-up to “Murder on the Orient Express,” developing Agatha Christie’s “Death on the Nile.”

The studio has hired “Orient Express” screenwriter Michael Green to return for “Death on the Nile.” It has not yet signed a deal with Kenneth Branagh, but he is expected to return to the director’s chair and reprise his role of the mustachioed Belgian detective Hercule Poirot.

Murder on the Orient Express” has performed solidly at box office with $50 million domestically and another $100 million internationally. In addition to Branagh, producers were Ridley Scott, Mark Gordon, Simon Kinberg, Judy Hofflund, and Michael Schaefer. Executive producers were James Prichard and Hilary Strong of Agatha Christie Ltd. along with Aditya Sood and Matthew Jenkins.

Christie first published “Death on the Nile” in 1937, three years after her “Murder on the Orient Express” was published. The plot places Poirot on a vacation in Egypt, discovering a murder
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Top Five Jack Warden Movie Roles of His Career

Jack Warden did a lot of things before he became an actor. He was expelled from school for fighting, and eventually he became a welterweight boxer but never managed to make much with his fists. Eventually he became a bouncer, a deckhand on a tugboat, and then joined the Navy. After tiring of that he went over to the Army, where he would eventually shatter his leg during a training exercise and be laid up for a period of time. He eventually got the idea that he would become an actor and from that point on the rest is history.

The Top Five Jack Warden Movie Roles of His Career
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Review: Woody Allen's "September" (1987) Starring Mia Farrow; Twilight Time Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
“Love And Angst”

By Raymond Benson

Woody Allen came off an incredible run of five superior films released between 1983 and 1987 (Zelig, Broadway Danny Rose, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Hannah and Her Sisters, and Radio Days) and then delivered one of his occasional “serious” pictures (without his presence as an actor) in late ’87 that was so dire that it only grossed approximately $500,000 in its initial run.

Basically a six-character “play” that takes many cues from the works of Anton Chekhov, September is set in a Vermont country house where depressed Lane (Mia Farrow) is recovering from a suicide attempt. Her best friend Stephanie (Dianne Wiest) is there for moral support. Lane is in love with tenant/writer Peter (Sam Waterston), and neighbor/teacher Howard (Denholm Elliott) is in love with Lane. She doesn’t share Howard’s affections, but Peter, however, is in love with Stephanie. Coming to visit into
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Flickering Myth Film Class: How To Do An Ensemble Film

In the latest instalment of Flickering Myth’s film class, Tom Jolliffe looks at how to pull off an ensemble film…

The art in pulling off the ensemble film. It’s a tricking balance. In the vast majority of cinema you may be limited to one or two clearly defined protagonists with a cast of supporting artists. On occasions though, a writer wants to create an ensemble piece. It may have one particular character who dominates the screen a little more than the others, but you could have four or more characters who share screen near equally.

How do you do it right? Well firstly, whether you have four characters, six, ten, or whatever, the most important element is to have clearly definable characters. You could call them archetypes certainly, but it is important to ensure that ‘character one’ is different from the rest. If you craft one character who
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

’12 Angry Men’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

Stars: Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, E. G. Marshall, Martin Balsam, Ed Begley, Jack Warden | Written by Reginald Rose | Directed by Sidney Lumet

It’s the hottest day of the year and a dozen men – not universally perturbed at this point – are put in a room and asked to consider the guilt of a young man accused of killing his father. It’s premeditated murder in the first degree and the sentence is death. The jury takes their first vote and it’s unanimous. Almost.

Juror #8 (Henry Fonda) is the sole dissenting voice. It’s not that he believes the kid did not do it; he’s just not sure. Over the next 90 real-time minutes, #8 will test his doubts against the others, to understand whether or not those doubts are reasonable.

12 Angry Men began life as a teleplay. Written by Reginald Rose (inspired by his own experiences as a juror
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Goldie Hawn Retrospective to Screen at the Quad Cinema in NYC

Goldie Hawn in “Private Benjamin

The upcoming mother-daughter comedy “Snatched” marks Goldie Hawn’s first film since 2002’s “The Banger Sisters.” To celebrate the end of Hawn’s 15-year sabbatical, the Quad will hold a retrospective of the Oscar winner’s films, a press release announced.

The Golden Goldies retrospective will see beloved Hawn films like “Private Benjamin,” “Swing Shift,” “Death Becomes Her,” and “The First Wives Club” screen on 35mm.

“No Hollywood actress in recent memory has come closer than Goldie Hawn to capturing the ebullience and whip-smart comic timing of the great screen comediennes of the ’30s and ’40s, a modern Joan Blondell or Carole Lombard,” the release states. “Though she won an Academy Award for one of her first roles (in 1969’s ‘Cactus Flower’), critics have tended to underestimate the depths of [Hawn’s] talent. The forthcoming film ‘Snatched’ marks her long-awaited return to the screen after a 15-year absence, and we’re celebrating the occasion with a greatest-hits retrospective, a veritable masterclass in the delicate art of cinematic comedy.”

It’s great that Hawn’s contributions to cinema are being recognized. However, while researching the Golden Goldies films as well as Hawn’s entire filmography, we noticed the actress has never worked with a female film director. From what we can tell, she has only collaborated with a woman director once, on a 2013 episode of the kids show “Phineas and Ferb.” Sue Perrotto co-directed the ep.

This is disappointing, but not a complete surprise. Last year Cosmopolitan published a story detailing how many big-name actors have never worked with a woman film director. Among them are Sean Connery, Sylvester Stallone, Ben Stiller, Matt Damon, Tom Cruise, and Tobey Maguire. And to be fair to them and Hawn, there are plenty of actresses who have never appeared in a woman-helmed film. Shailene Woodley, for example, has not appeared in a feature film directed by a woman

Still. We wish both male and female power players would follow Jessica Chastain’s lead. “I’m looking to work with a female filmmaker every year,” she told Variety. “That’s my goal. They’re not given the same opportunities so if I have any influence in choosing a film or a script or finding a director I’m absolutely going to make a difference. That doesn’t mean I’m excluding men — it means I need some balance in my life.”

And she’s achieving it; Chastain has worked with female directors like Kathryn Bigelow, Liv Ullmann, and Susanna White. Her most recent collaboration with a woman director is Niki Caro’s “The Zookeeper’s Wife.”

The Golden Goldies retrospective will be May 6–11 at the Quad in New York City. The featured films and their synopses are below, courtesy of Quad Cinema.

“Death Becomes Her”

Robert Zemeckis, 1992, 104m, U.S., 35mm

Sun May 7 & Mon May 8

When glamorous narcissist Meryl Streep steals her fiancé Bruce Willis, Hawn finds revenge in an elixir of youth (and immortality) supplied by a seductively devilish Isabella Rossellini. Rivalry escalates to murder as Hawn and Streep battle it out in the land of the undead in this cult black comedy about all-consuming vanity.

The First Wives Club

Hugh Wilson, 1996, U.S., 103m, 35mm

Mon May 8

Spite never sleeps in this gleefully vindictive comedy about getting even and the bonds of sisterhood. Hawn stars opposite Bette Midler and Diane Keaton as a once-acclaimed actress plagued by ageism and out for revenge against her ex-husband and his perky new muse. But acrimony eventually gives way to a new sense of liberation, culminating in an ever-endearing rendition of Lesley Gore’s anthem of female independence.

Overboard

Garry Marshall, 1987, U.S., 106m, 35mm

Wed May 10

Wertmüller’s “Swept Away” reimagined as big studio farce, with Hawn’s shrill heiress mistreating blue-collar carpenter Kurt Russell, who then proceeds to enact romantic revenge after she’s afflicted with amnesia. Despite the retrograde sexual politics, the chemistry is palpable and the comic timing immaculate.

Private Benjamin

Howard Zieff, 1980, U.S., 109m, 35mm

Wed May 6 & Thur May 11

After husband Albert Brooks dies on their wedding night, spoiled rich girl Hawn is convinced by military recruiter Harry Dean Stanton to join the U.S. Army, where she comes up against a tough-as-nails C.O. Eileen Brennan. Both Hawn and Brennan were nominated for Academy Awards in this beloved box-office hit.

Seems Like Old Times

Jay Sandrich, 1980, USA, 100m, 35mm

Tue May 10 & Thu May 11

Hawn hits her comedic stride in this irresistible Neil Simon farce as a characteristically zany public defender torn between district attorney husband Charles Grodin and her ex, Chevy Chase, a writer charged with bank robbery. Things escalate towards a fever pitch when she decides to represent him in court.

Shampoo

Hal Ashby, 1975, U.S., 110m, Dcp

Mon May 8 & Wed May 11

The dream team of Ashby, screenwriter Robert Towne, and actor-producer Warren Beatty set their biting farce and undisputed ’70s classic on the eve of Nixon’s 1968 electoral landslide, with over-sexed, in-demand, and increasingly vexed hairdresser Beatty juggling frustrated girlfriend Hawn, taxing client Lee Grant, ex-girlfriend Julie Christie, and potential business partner Jack Warden as America lurches to the right.

The Sugarland Express

Steven Spielberg, 1974, U.S., 110m, 35mm

Sat May 6 & Mon May 8

After losing their baby son to the state, small-time crooks Hawn and William Atherton snatch him right back and go on the run, with seemingly every law enforcement officer in Texas in hot pursuit. Spielberg’s first feature refines the technical mastery of Duel, but Hawn’s performance as an exasperated, manically determined mother gives this picture a more resonant pathos.

Swing Shift

Jonathan Demme, 1984, U.S., 100m, 35mm

Sun May 7 & Thur May 10

When hubby Ed Harris ships off to fight WWII, housewife Hawn finds herself via a factory job — and a fling with hunky trumpet player Kurt Russell. Despite her contentious relationship with her director, Hawn displays her greatest emotional range here, and Demme’s deft touch for humanist comedy shines through. Featuring Christine Lahti, Fred Ward, and Holly Hunter.

Goldie Hawn Retrospective to Screen at the Quad Cinema in NYC was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Don Rickles Remembered as Hollywood Mourns the Loss of a Comedy Genius

  • MovieWeb
Don Rickles Remembered as Hollywood Mourns the Loss of a Comedy Genius
Earlier today, we reportedly the sad news that Hollywood has lost another legend, with comedian Don Rickles passing away at the age of 90. His publicist confirmed that the iconic insult comic passed in his Los Angeles home, from kidney failure. As word of his passing spread, Hollywood icons left and right paid tribute to the late comedian through social media, to honor this late legend.

While most sent out their tributes through Twitter, others released lengthier tributes elsewhere. Rolling Stone caught up with Gilbert Gottfried, who summed up the the late comedian's legacy with a heartfelt statement that explained why Rickles will go down in history as one of the best comedians ever. Here's what Gilbert Gottfried had to say.

"Don Rickles was never politically correct, and he would never apologize for any of it. He was totally unapologetic about his comedy. So I admired that and looked at him
See full article at MovieWeb »

Don Rickles, Legendary Comedian, Passes Away at 90

  • MovieWeb
Don Rickles, Legendary Comedian, Passes Away at 90
The Hollywood community is in morning once again, with another iconic performer passing away. Don Rickles, the legendary insult comedian and actor, died at the age of 90, in his Los Angeles home. The actor/comedian's publicist, Paul Shefrin, confirmed that his client had succumbed to kidney failure earlier today.

The Hollywood Reporter reveals that the funeral services will be private, and that donations can be made in the late comedian's name to his son's organization, the Larry Rickles Endowment Fund at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. Don Rickles was born May 8, 1926 in New York City, raised in the Jackson Heights neighborhood of Queens. He graduated from Newtown High School and served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, after which, he returned home and graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts.

Don Rickles got his start in the entertainment business by performing as a stand-up comedian for several years.
See full article at MovieWeb »

After The Fox / Being There

After The Fox

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber

2017 / Color / 2.35 : 1 widescreen / Street Date March 22, 2017

Starring: Peter Sellers, Victor Mature, Martin Balsem, Akim Tamiroff.

Cinematography: Leonida Barboni

Film Editor: Russell Lloyd

Written by Neil Simon and Cesare Zavattini

Produced by John Bryan

Directed by Vittorio De Sica

After The Fox, a sunny mid-sixties farce about con-artists and movie-makers, boasts a powerhouse pedigree featuring leading men Peter Sellers and Victor Mature, a script by Neil Simon and Cesare Zavattini, music by Burt Bacharach, poster art from Frank Frazetta and the legendary director/actor/gambler Vittorio De Sica at the helm.

With such diverse talent on board, the film was somewhat misleadingly promoted as another in the line of 60’s screwball hipster comedies like Casino Royale and What’s New Pussycat. But the result is closer to De Sica’s laid back charmers from the ‘50s, Miracle in Milan and Gold of Naples (in fact,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Who is Warren Beatty? His Top Film Roles

  • Cineplex
Who is Warren Beatty? His Top Film Roles Who is Warren Beatty? His Top Film Roles Scott Goodyer11/23/2016 10:44:00 Am

It's been awhile since we last heard from Warren Beatty. But legends never die and this Hollywood star is back with Rules Don't Apply.

Like most of his films, Beatty co-wrote, produced and directed this romantic comedy, which tells the tale of an unconventional love story about an aspiring actress and her driver, who try to make a relationship work under the eccentric billionaire they work for - who happens to be Howard Hughes, played by Beatty himself.

The cast is quite impressive with stars like: Alec Baldwin, Ed Harris, Matthew Broderick, Martin Sheen, Oliver Pratt and Beatty's wife of 25 years Annette Bening, all making appearances.

Check out Rules Don't Apply when it hits Cineplex Theatres on November 23rd and in honour of the iconic talent who's been Oscar-nominated 14 times,
See full article at Cineplex »

Review: "Billy Two Hats" (1974) Starring Gregory Peck; Blu-ray Special Edition From Kino Lorber

  • CinemaRetro
By John M. Whalen

Ted Kotcheff’s “Billy Two Hats” (1974) is one of those off-beat kind of movies they made back in the mid-Seventies when studios still believed in small, realistic films that focused on character more than shoot-outs, believable story lines more than special effects and solid performances by seasoned actors who knew their craft more than flashy histrionics by shiny boys and girls who just stepped off the front pages of the supermarket tabloids. It’s not a great film by any means. It’s slow, and a bit heavy handed in getting across the themes contained in Alan Sharp’s (“Osterman Weekend,” “Ulzana’s Raid”) script, but it’s worth watching, if only so you can say you’ve seen the only “Kosher Western” ever made.

57-year-old Gregory Peck, speaking with a thick Scottish accent, stars as Arch Deans, a bank robber on the run with his
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Greatest One-Location Movies of All-Time

There’s something claustrophobic about a film set entirely in a single location, an unsettling feeling of being cornered in a confined environment, cut off from the rest of the world. Stories such as these require nuanced characters and thoughtful attention to narrative detail, many of which employ a theatrical feel, while others were literally sprung from a playwright’s pen. Their action sequences are merely verbal, characters revealing shocking truths and saying the unthinkable, while the setting forces them together until an often brutal conclusion. When people are trapped like rats, it’s no surprise they sometimes eat each other.

A new entry in this sub-genre, Green Room, a violent thriller from Blue Ruin director Jeremy Saulnier expands this weekend. In the film, after a punk band witnesses a vicious murder, they find themselves trapped in the club’s green room, forced to fight their way out to freedom.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Best Baseball Movies

In the midst of March Madness and with the Kentucky Derby around the corner, the first pitch of baseball season is almost here.

A quote from Field Of Dreams best describes America’s national pastime, “The one constant throughout the years has been baseball.”

To mark the start of the 2016 season, here’s our list of the Best Baseball movies.

The Bad News Bears

Considered by some to be the best baseball movie ever, the film celebrates its 40th anniversary this month (April 7, 1976). In an article from the NY Daily News, one line reads, “It is a movie that someone like the late Philip Seymour Hoffman called his favorite, and one which resonates on many levels today, with all different generations.”

Who are we to argue with greatness?

After skewering all-American subjects such as politics (The Candidate) and beauty pageants (Smile), director Michael Ritchie naturally set his sights on the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Imitation of Life,’ ‘Being There,’ ‘Ghostbusters,’ and More Added to National Film Registry

Since 1989, the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress has been accomplishing the important task of preserving films that “represent important cultural, artistic and historic achievements in filmmaking.” From films way back in 1897 all the way up to 2004, they’ve now reached 675 films that celebrate our heritage and encapsulate our film history.

Today they’ve unveiled their 2015 list, which includes classics such as Douglas Sirk‘s melodrama Imitation of Life, Hal Ashby‘s Being There, and John Frankenheimer‘s Seconds. Perhaps the most popular picks, The Shawshank Redemption, Ghostbusters, Top Gun, and L.A. Confidential were also added. Check out the full list below.

Being There (1979)

Chance, a simple-minded gardener (Peter Sellers) whose only contact with the outside world is through television, becomes the toast of the town following a series of misunderstandings. Forced outside his protected environment by the death of his wealthy boss, Chance subsumes his late employer’s persona,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections
Ghostbusters,” “Top Gun,” “L.A. Confidential” and “Being There” are among the Library of Congress’ 2015 selections for the National Film Registry.

Each year, the Library of Congress adds 25 notable films to its permanent collection, ensuring that the titles will be preserved for generations to come. The 2015 class is typically eclectic, ranging from silent films to 1980s blockbusters, edgy indies to educational films such as the Disney-produced 1946 entry “The Story of Menstruation.”

“Selecting a film for the National Film Registry recognizes its importance to cinema and America’s cultural and artistic history,” said acting Librarian of Congress David Mao. “The registry is an invaluable way to advance public awareness of the richness, creativity and variety of our nation’s film heritage.”

The 2015 selections bring the number of titles in the registry to 675. The films are selected by Library of Congress staffers and the National Film Preservation Board, after reviewing nominations made
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Guillermin, Director of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dead at 89

  • The Wrap
John Guillermin, Director of ‘The Towering Inferno,’ Dead at 89
John Guillermin, director of such films as “The Towering Inferno” and the 1976 remake of “King Kong,” died on Monday, his wife announced on social media. He was 89 years old. The British filmmaker was best known for big-budget action films, which also included “El Condor,” “Shaft in Africa,” “Death on the Nile,” “Sheena” and the sequel “King Kong Lives.” He has directed actors such as Paul Newman, Jessica Lange, Lee Van Cleef, Steve McQueen, Peter Ustinov, Mia Farrow, Orson Welles, Angela Lansbury, George Peppard, David Niven, Jeff Bridges, Jack Warden, Richard Chamberlain, William Holden and Faye Dunaway. Guillermin was born in London,
See full article at The Wrap »

Academy Award Film Series: Largely Forgotten Hoffman Movie Stolen by Oscar-Nominated Actress

'Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me?' with Dustin Hoffman. Long-titled movie 'Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me?': Messy filmmaking with one single bright spot To call Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? a curiosity is to perhaps infer quality buried in its quirk, or virtue obscured by its capriciousness. That's not the case, really, as this largely existential film is an absolute mess with only one bright spot of redemption (more on her later). Directed by Ulu Grosbard, Who Is Harry Kellerman… – with its long-winded, desperate title – is a curiosity along the lines of a relic, a work that somehow speaks of its time. Unfortunately, it really does not speak coherently, even if the film is unmistakably post-Woodstock, pre-Watergate, and all-American, with errant themes of success,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Raising Caine on TCM: From Smooth Gay Villain to Tough Guy in 'Best British Film Ever'

Michael Caine young. Michael Caine movies: From Irwin Allen bombs to Woody Allen classic It's hard to believe that Michael Caine has been around making movies for nearly six decades. No wonder he's had time to appear – in roles big and small and tiny – in more than 120 films, ranging from unwatchable stuff like the Sylvester Stallone soccer flick Victory and Michael Ritchie's adventure flick The Island to Brian G. Hutton's X, Y and Zee, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's Sleuth (a duel of wits and acting styles with Laurence Olivier), and Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men. (See TCM's Michael Caine movie schedule further below.) Throughout his long, long career, Caine has played heroes and villains and everything in between. Sometimes, in his worst vehicles, he has floundered along with everybody else. At other times, he was the best element in otherwise disappointing fare, e.g., Philip Kaufman's Quills.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Phenomenal Allen as Too-Good-to-Be-True U.S. V.P. Candidate in Highly Watchable But Ultimately Coy Political Thriller

'The Contender' movie hero: Joan Allen as the virtuous Sen. Laine Hanson. 'The Contender' movie: Exceptional Joan Allen in intriguing but ultimately wimpy political drama "Principles only mean anything when we stick by them when they're inconvenient," says Senator Laine Hanson, played by Joan Allen in Rod Lurie's The Contender. Senator Hanson should know. In Lurie's political drama, the poor Democratic senator is grilled by a Republican inquisitor with a bad hairdo (Gary Oldman) who wants to prevent at all costs her being confirmed as the next Vice President of the United States. Even if that means destroying Hanson's political career by making public the senator's alleged participation in an orgy during her college days.* Now, why such hatred? Well, the Republican watchdog is certain that the U.S. president (Jeff Bridges) has chosen Sen. Hanson because of her gender instead of her qualifications for the job. Adding insult to injury,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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