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Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: ‘Wonder Woman,’ 1970s Cinema, ‘Alien: Covenant,’ and More

We are knee-deep into a summer of dreary sequels, kids’ fare, and a few whip-smart outliers. If you’ve already seen the likes of The Beguiled and Baby Driver, perhaps staying home with a book is a better idea than trekking to the cinema. Let’s dive into some worthy film-centric reads.

Wonder Woman: The Art and Making of the Film by Sharon Gosling (Titan Books)

Patty JenkinsWonder Woman is one of the biggest superhero success stories, and it deserves that designation. The classification makes reading a book like Wonder Woman: The Art and Making of the Film feel like a celebratory affair. After a brief account of the character’s comics history, we delve into designs for Themyscira, concept art of Dr. Maru’s laboratory, and somber depictions of battle. What stands out, however, are drawings and photographs showing the film’s winning costume designs. It is illuminating,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Review: The Art And Marking Of Alien Covenant

Titan Books were generous to give Lrm The Art and Making of Alien Covenant, by Simon Ward. The book begins with a Foreword from Ridley Scott where he speaks concerning the purpose of the book:

"In the pages that follow, is the work of great designers, technicians and artists all working in coordination to produce a beautiful vision of this future. The story explores the evolving universe of the Alien, this elaborating into questions and morality of creating life forms" (Foreword).

If the Alien franchise is something that you are a fan of, then this book is for you.  Coming off the release of Alien Covenant, the book begins with a look back to the original movies where Scott states that he, "...always thought of Alien way back when as kind of a B-movie, really well done" (9).  It's interesting to see the lack of expectations he initially had.  The book
See full article at LRM Online »

The Art And Making Of Kong: Skull Island Book Coming This March

Go behind-the-scenes of Kong: Skull Island with The Art and Making of Kong: Skull Island from Titan Books, which will be unleashed just four days after the film's release on March 14th.

From Titan Books: "In March 2017, the producers of ‘Godzilla’ transport audiences to the birthplace of one of the most powerful monster myths of all in Kong: Skull Island, from Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures.

When a scientific expedition to an uncharted island awakens titanic forces of nature, a mission of discovery becomes an explosive war between monster and man. Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson, Brie Larson, John Goodman and John C. Reilly star in a thrilling and original new adventure that reveals the untold story of how Kong became King.

The Art and Making of Kong: Skull Island goes behind the scenes and reveals how this monster-sized production was brought to the screen. Featuring incredible concept art and on-set photography,
See full article at DailyDead »

A Halloween Electric Dreamhouse

Yesterday, amid a crush of sweaty people desperate for last-minute props, I visited a local Halloween superstore with my daughter, looking for a Pikachu mask. Well, there wasn’t much to choose from in the Cute Kid Division. But this particular hall of Halloween hell definitely had the adult sensibility covered. Of course there were the usual skimpy or otherwise outrageous costumes for purchase —ladies, you can dress up like a sexy Kim Kardashian-esque vampire out for a night of Hollywood clubbing, and gents, how about impressing all the sexy Kim Kardashian vampires at your party by dressing up like a walking, talking matched set of cock and balls! It’s been a while since I’ve shopped for fake tools of terror, but it seems there’s been a real advance in sophistication in the market for “Leatherface-approved” (I swear) chainsaws with moving parts and authentic revving noises,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: Stanley Kubrick, Éric Rohmer, ‘Star Trek,’ Wes Anderson, and More

A nearly 600-page biography of a French filmmaker would not make every summer reading list, but any discerning cinephile will consider Éric Rohmer: A Biography. It’s one of several stunning recent releases, along with a weighty oral history of Star Trek, an intimate remembrance of Stanley Kubrick, and a fascinating breakdown of the great Suspiria. Now that’s an eclectic roster of beach reads.

The Fifty-Year Mission: The Complete, Uncensored, Unauthorized Oral History of Star Trek: Volume One: The First 25 Years by Edward Gross and Mark A. Altman (Thomas Dunne Books)

Even minor Star Trek fans will be spellbound by The Fifty-Year Mission, a stunning oral history from Edward Gross and Mark A. Altman. The first in a two-volume set — Volume Two, covering the last 25 years, will be released in late-August — is impressively comprehensive, and full of unforgettable stories. These include the original series rivalry between William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy,
See full article at The Film Stage »

10 Commonly Overlooked Horror Films Worth Seeing

When I was a kid, I used to love a scary movie. I remember catching the original The Haunting (1963) one night on Channel 9’s Million Dollar Movie when I was home alone. Before it was over, I had every light in the house on. When my mother got home she was screaming she’d been able to see the house glowing from two blocks away. The only thing screaming louder than her was the electricity meter.

That was something of an accomplishment, scaring me like that. Oh, it’s not that I was hard to scare (I still don’t like going down into a dark cellar). But, in those days, the movies didn’t have much to scare you with. Back as far as the 50s, you might find your odd dismemberment and impaling, even an occasional decapitation, but, generally, the rule of the day was restraint. Even those rare dismemberments,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Fright At Home – October 6th, 2015

This week’s Fright At Home is going to be a jam packed one. Quite a few releases hit shelves and online stores today, so it’ll be a bit lengthy. Everything from sci-fi/action to straight up horror, and even some horror/comedy fare thrown in for good measure.

Our last F.A.H. post was a video one, and we’re testing out what format works best for you readers so please feel free to let us know if you prefer written or video rundowns of each week’s releases. Read on!

Nocturna (Alchemy)

It’s Christmastime in New Orleans and children are mysteriously disappearing, stolen from their homes, taken off the street, dozens have vanished without a trace. Detective Harry Ganat and his partner Roy Cody have found a young girl in the home of a murdered swamper and she leads them to the den of her captors…
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Horror Classics: Four Chilling Movies from Hammer Films

Warners answers the call for Hammer horror with four nifty thrillers starring the great Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. The transfers are immaculate -- Technicolor was never richer than this. The only drawback is that Chris Lee's Dracula has so few lines of dialogue.  On hi-def, Cushing's Frankenstein movie is a major re-discovery as well. Horror Classics: Four Chilling Movies from Hammer Films Blu-ray The Mummy, Dracula has Risen from the Grave, Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed, Taste the Blood of Dracula Warner Home Video 1959-1970 / Color / 1:66 - 1:78 widescreen / 376 min. / Street Date October 6, 2015 / 54.96 Starring Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Yvonne Furneaux, George Pastell, Michael Ripper; Christopher Lee, Rupert Davies, Veronica Carlson, Barbara Ewing, Barry Andrews, Ewan Hooper, Michael Ripper; Peter Cushing, Veronica Carlson, Freddie Jones, Simon Ward, Thorley Walters, Maxine Audley; Christopher Lee, Geoffrey Keen, Linda Hayden, Isla Blair, John Carson, Ralph Bates, Roy Kinnear. <Cinematography Jack Asher; Arthur Grant; Arthur Grant; Arthur Grant.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Eiff’s Chris Fujiwara resurfaces at new London East Asia Film Festival

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: New festival plans launch in 2016; preview event this month will open with the European premiere of Korean box office hit Veteran.

Plans have been revealed to launch a new annual event in London dedicated to East Asian film.

The inaugural London East Asia Film Festival (Leaff) will launch in 2016 with a programme of titles from emerging and established directors, attended by filmmakers and stars.

The new festival - founded by former London Korean Film Festival director Hye-jung Jeon – has recruited Chris Fujiwara as chief programmer.

Fujiwara stepped down as artistic director of Edinburgh International Film Festival after three festivals in September 2014. An independent film critic and programmer, Fujiwara had previously developed film festival programmes for Jeonju, Sydney and Mar del Plata among others.

Three film festival advisors, Ji-seok Kim from Busan International Film Festival, Roger Garcia from Hong Kong International Film Festival, and Simon Ward from Independent Cinema Office (Ico), have advised Leaff on its vision
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Horror Classics Vol. 1 Released On Blu-ray By Warner Home Video

  • CinemaRetro
Warner Home Video has a nasty Halloween treat for all: the release of the Horror Classics Vol. 1 boxed Blu-ray set. The titles are smartly bound in a hardcover book format, complete with some cool graphics. Each of the films contains the original theatrical trailer as well. Here is the official press release:

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will scare the heck out of fans when Taste the Blood of Dracula; Dracula Has Risen from the Grave, Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed; and The Mummy are released October 6 in the new Blu-ray Horror Classics Vol. 1 Collection, just in time for Halloween celebrations. All films in the collection are newly re-mastered in 1080p HD and packaged in elegant rigid pocketbook style ($54.96 Srp).

The quartet of classic horror films, featuring cinema monsters Dracula, Frankenstein and the Mummy, represent classic examples from Hammer Film Productions. Founded in 1934, the British company became best known for a series
See full article at CinemaRetro »

It’s Hammer Time When Warner Bros. Releases Horror Classics Collection Vol.1 This October

Warner Bros. is gearing up to give fans of Hammer Horror a Halloween treat, when they unleash Horror Classics, Vol. 1 on October 6th. A four film Bluray boxset featuring Hammer classics Taste the Blood of Dracula; Dracula Has Risen from the Grave, Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed, and The Mummy, the boxset is just what horror lovers need to fill their Hammer, Cushing and Lee fixes.

Being a huge fan of Hammer Films and not only their classic films, but even the recent revival of the studio (Let Me In, The Woman In Black, The Quiet Ones), this announcement brings quite the smile to my face and I’m sure you horror lovers feel the same.

The Mummy (1959)

In this vivid Technicolor® reincarnation of The Mummy, screen horror icon Christopher Lee wraps on the moldy gauze bandages and emerges as the tormented Kharis, an avenger stalking the hills and bogs of
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Hammer Horror Classics Volume One Blu-ray Collection Announced

Though Sir Christopher Lee sadly passed away, his work will live on forever. In a new Blu-ray set, Warner Archive is preserving three Lee-starring Hammer horror movies: Dracula Has Risen From The Grave, The Mummy, and Taste the Blood of Dracula.

Blu-ray.com reports that Warner Archive's Horror Classics Volume One Blu-ray collection will hit shelves this fall (October 6th, according to Home Theater Forum). The collection includes four Hammer films: Dracula Has Risen From The Grave (1968), The Mummy (1959), Taste the Blood of Dracula (1970), and Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969).

In addition to the Horror Classics Volume One, Warner Archive will also release the Special Effects Collection Volume One, a sci-fi / adventure Blu-ray set comprising Son of Kong, Mighty Joe Young, Beast From 20,000 Fathoms, and Them!

It's estimated that both collections will be priced at $54.96 apiece and released in early October, and it's even believed that the titles will be sold separately,
See full article at DailyDead »

BT Sport won't face action from Ofcom over "rug munchers" comment

Ofcom won't take further action against BT Sport after a rugby commentator described players as "rug munchers".

The media watchdog has ruled that the broadcaster's on-air apology will suffice as punishment for the remark, which it said could not be justified by the context.

During the European Rugby Challenge Cup match between Newcastle Falcons and Newport Gwent Dragons, Simon Ward used the term, which is a well-known insult used to describe lesbians.

However, the programme's executive producer did not pick up on the problem as he thought the phrase was a reference to players who fall over on the pitch.

In conversation with his co-commentator Colin Charvis, Ward said: "[Former England rugby union player] Mickey Skinner used to say something about rug-munchers but we'll stick with vegetables - I'm sure that's a lot more polite."

Ofcom said the use of the term was "potentially offensive" to viewers due to its "derogatory" nature.

A spokesperson said:
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Big E's “Bad” Movies That Hurt So Good: “Curse Of The Black Widow” (1977, TV Movie)

  • CinemaRetro
“If a movie makes you happy, for whatever reason, then it’s a good movie.”

—Big E

*******Warning: Review Contains Spoilers*******

By Ernie Magnotta

If there’s one thing I love, it’s 1970s made-for-tv horror films. I remember sitting in front of the television as a kid and watching a plethora of films such as Gargoyles, Bad Ronald, Satan’s School for Girls, Horror at 37,000 Feet, Devil Dog: Hound of Hell, Scream Pretty Peggy, Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark, Moon of the Wolf and The Initiation of Sarah just to name a few. Some of those are better than others, but all were fun.

When I think back, there have been some legendary names associated with small screen horrors. Genre masters John Carpenter (Halloween), Steven Spielberg (Jaws), Wes Craven (Nightmare on Elm Street), Tobe Hooper (Texas Chainsaw Massacre) and Joseph Stefano (Psycho) all took shots at television
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Top 100 Horror Movies: How Truly Horrific Are They?

Top 100 horror movies of all time: Chicago Film Critics' choices (photo: Sigourney Weaver and Alien creature show us that life is less horrific if you don't hold grudges) See previous post: A look at the Chicago Film Critics Association's Scariest Movies Ever Made. Below is the list of the Chicago Film Critics's Top 100 Horror Movies of All Time, including their directors and key cast members. Note: this list was first published in October 2006. (See also: Fay Wray, Lee Patrick, and Mary Philbin among the "Top Ten Scream Queens.") 1. Psycho (1960) Alfred Hitchcock; with Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam. 2. The Exorcist (1973) William Friedkin; with Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, Jason Miller, Max von Sydow (and the voice of Mercedes McCambridge). 3. Halloween (1978) John Carpenter; with Jamie Lee Curtis, Donald Pleasence, Tony Moran. 4. Alien (1979) Ridley Scott; with Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, John Hurt. 5. Night of the Living Dead (1968) George A. Romero; with Marilyn Eastman,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Screen Awards 2014 winners

Updated (gallery/official winners book): The Screen Awards has unveiled its 2014 winners, recognising excellence in UK marketing, distribution and exhibition.Scroll down for full list of winnersBrowse the Screen Awards book Heregallery: Click here for pictures from the night

The awards were handed out at a glamorous ceremony at The Brewery in London last night, before 500 assembled guests. Broadcaster Edith Bowman hosted the event for the third year.

Twentieth Century Fox took home the hotly contested studio distributor of the year award, while Curzon Artificial Eye won the best independent distributor prize.

Prison drama Starred Up, from Twentieth Century Fox, took home theatrical campaign of the year, with a highly commended notice for Alain Guiraudie’s Stranger By The Lake.

Twentieth Century Fox scored a further four wins including 3D campaign for How To Train Your Dragon 2 and prizes for best marketing team, online campaign for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes with Think Jam
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Screen Awards 2014 winners revealed

Updated (gallery/official winners book): The Screen Awards has unveiled its 2014 winners, recognising excellence in UK marketing, distribution and exhibition.Scroll down for full list of winnersBrowse the Screen Awards book Heregallery: Click here for pictures from the night

The awards were handed out at a glamorous ceremony at The Brewery in London last night, before 500 assembled guests. Broadcaster Edith Bowman hosted the event for the third year.

Twentieth Century Fox took home the hotly contested studio distributor of the year award, while Curzon Artificial Eye won the best independent distributor prize.

Prison drama Starred Up, from Twentieth Century Fox, took home theatrical campaign of the year, with a highly commended notice for Alain Guiraudie’s Stranger By The Lake.

Twentieth Century Fox scored a further four wins including 3D campaign for How To Train Your Dragon 2 and prizes for best marketing team, online campaign for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes with Think Jam
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Ten Best: Unforgettable Dracula Performances

Horror cinema has a long tradition of creating iconic characters and none more so than those borne in the early days of the genre: characters such as Frankenstein’s monster, the Mummy, the Creature from the Black Lagoon and, of course, Dracula – the king of horror. A character who, despite his many cinematic deaths, always returns to the silver screen for one more bite of flesh… As he does this week in Dracula Untold, which features Luke Evans as the evil Vlad Tepes.

With that in mind we thought we’d rundown the ten best unforgettable Dracula performances in cinema. Check them out below and let us know in the comments if you agree or disagree!

Christopher LeeDracula (1958)

Dracula (1958) is the first in the series of Hammer Horror films. Directed by Terence Fisher, Dracula (1958) stars Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, Melissa Stribling, Carol Marsh and Michael Gough. Retitled Horror of Dracula
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Strictly Come Dancing Week 1 Live Blog: As it happened

Friday night's Strictly opener got off to a dazzling start with the great (Pixie Lott, Jake Wood and Caroline Flack) and the not-so-great (Scott Mills) providing us with excitement, drama and a few laughs.

This evening, the remaining nine celebrities hit the dance floor for the first time with their pro partners. Frankie Bridge, Thom Evans, Simon Webbe and Gregg 'Buttery Biscuit Base' Wallace are among those hoping to impress us with their cha chas, jives and waltzes.

20:27So that's all folks. Time for a breather and a chance to look back at all my dreadful spelling and grammar during the evening. Apologies for that! It's been lovely working on Strictly again. Please let us know who you think was the best in the comments below.

20:26Looking back at all the dances now, Mark Wright's performance is looking more impressive than most. Especially considering his personality is
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »
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