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Friday’s best TV: Mastermind; Only Connect; Scott Walker Prom

  • The Guardian - TV News
Friday night quiz night is back, while Jarvis Cocker leads performers through highlights from the unconventional musician’s solo albums. And, after eight long and nondescript weeks, it’s the Big Brother live final

Scott Walker’s restless and experimental recent work will have seemed forbiddingly outre to many of the people who adore his more melodically conventional earlier music. But their preferences will be well and truly catered for by Prom 15, in which Jarvis Cocker leads performers including Susanne Sundfør, John Grant and Richard Hawley through a selection of songs from the four eponymous Walker solo albums that culminated in 1969’s sublime Scott 4. Phil Harrison

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Best Trailers of 2016

It’s easy to bemoan the majority of trailers for giving away too much or, upon seeing the film, ending up with something far different than what was marketed. However, a few times a year, a trailer works on its own terms; as an impressive piece of editing in its own right and/or as the ideal tease for an highly-anticipated film. We’ve selected our 20 favorites from the last year, ranging from some of 2017’s biggest films to the best in arthouse and foreign films to a handful of surprises.

Check them out below and let us know which trailers you were most impressed with in 2016.

20. The Lost City of Z

A late contender to the list, this brief preview for The Lost of City of Z was perfect tease for James Gray‘s period epic. Giving us our first glimpse at Darius Khondji‘s stunning, shot-on-35mm visuals,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 10 Best Movie Scores of 2016

  • Indiewire
The 10 Best Movie Scores of 2016
Like a divine consolation for our collective heartache, the world was gifted with an absurd volume of beautiful new things to listen to in 2016. But epochal new albums from the likes of Radiohead, Anohni, Frank Ocean, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen, and the sisters Knowles (to name just a few) only told a small part of the story, as much of the year’s best new music was Trojan horse-ed into our lives via the movies.

The Best of 2016: IndieWire’s Year in Review Bible

Conner4Real wrote pop songs as catchy and profound as anything by The Weeknd, Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling exchanged a series of bittersweet ballads, and a Polynesian princess followed her voice over the horizon. But it was the instrumental pieces that cut the deepest, as many of the best new films were proudly inextricable from their scores. “Moonlight” and “La La Land,” currently dominating the awards circuit,
See full article at Indiewire »

Natalie Portman Steps Into the First Lady’s Shoes in Trailer for Pablo Larraín’s ‘Jackie’

It’ll be hard for me to read, hear, type, or say the title of Pablo Larraín‘s new film without hearing ’60s-era Scott Walker and a charging backing band, but most have been kind enough for me to think Jackie can stand on its own. Most of the praise for his Natalie Portman-led biopic of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy has concerned its lack of resemblance to the typical story-of-a-great-figure mold, critics having noted its formal boldness. You’ll get a taste of that in the first preview, which Fox Searchlight have released in advance of its December opening.

If one would like to preserve surprise and instead get a more subjective sense of Jackie‘s greatness, read our review. As we said, “It’s one of three films to be released by the prolific director in 2016 (alongside El Club and Neruda), as well as his first to be
See full article at The Film Stage »

Paul Walker's Brothers Say Filming Furious 7 Helped Them Grieve His Death

  • PEOPLE.com
Paul Walker's Brothers Say Filming Furious 7 Helped Them Grieve His Death
Paul Walker was still filming the seventh installment in the Fast and the Furious franchise when he died. To finish the film, his brothers Caleb Walker and Cody Walker stepped in - doubling for the actor in critical scenes to help finish his storyline. Now, nearly three years later, the Walker brothers say that experience helped them grieve their loss. "We got to understand more about Paul, and what he was all about," Caleb told Cameron Mathison in an interview with Entertainment Tonight. "We had to share Paul with a lot of people, in a weird way. He was gone a lot,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Paul Walker's Brothers Say Filming Furious 7 Helped Them Grieve His Death

  • PEOPLE.com
Paul Walker's Brothers Say Filming Furious 7 Helped Them Grieve His Death
Paul Walker was still filming the seventh installment in the Fast and the Furious franchise when he died. To finish the film, his brothers Caleb Walker and Cody Walker stepped in - doubling for the actor in critical scenes to help finish his storyline. Now, nearly three years later, the Walker brothers say that experience helped them grieve their loss. "We got to understand more about Paul, and what he was all about," Caleb told Cameron Mathison in an interview with Entertainment Tonight. "We had to share Paul with a lot of people, in a weird way. He was gone a lot,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Weekly Rushes. "Olli Mäki," Ingrid Bergman's Home Movies, Trailers Galore, Scott Walker's Score

  • MUBI
NEWSMost exciting for us this week is the news that the Cannes Un Certain Regard prizewinner this year, Juho Kuosmanen's wonderful debut film The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki, will be having its North American premiere in the Discovery section of the Toronto International Film Festival. Mubi is distributing the film theatrically and digitally in the United States and United Kingdom.Recommended VIEWINGCourtesy of the Criterion Collection, excerpts of Ingrid Bergman's home movies, which include Alfred Hitchcock, made around the time of their collaboration on Spellbound. With the full lineup of the Toronto International Film Festival announced and the autumn film season nearly upon us, wonderful trailers have been released in an overwhelming deluge. Here are some of the highlights:The much-anticipated restoration and re-release of Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust.Hong Sang-soo's Yourself and Yours, which gets a typically wacky trailer.Bertrand Bonello's Nocturama,
See full article at MUBI »

Scott Walker Releases Dynamic, Orchestral ‘Childhood of a Leader’ Score – Listen

Scott Walker Releases Dynamic, Orchestral ‘Childhood of a Leader’ Score – Listen
In 2015, Brady Corbet’s debut film “The Childhood of a Leader,” starring Bérénice Bejo, Liam Cunningham, and Robert Pattinson, premiered at the Venice International Film Festival to great acclaim, eventually wining Best Debut and Best Director at the festival. Last month, IFC Films released the film in theaters and VOD, but now its dynamic orchestral score can finally be heard in its entirely on Spotify. Legendary singer-songwriter Scott Walker composed the score, making it the second film score he’s made after Léos Carax’s 1999 film “Pola X.” Listen to it in its entirety below.

Read More: ‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

Scott Walker began his career as a 60s pop star before becoming an avant-garde artist in the 21st century. He first released music as a member of The Walker Brothers, a group that achieved great success in the United Kingdom,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Childhood of a Leader movie review: the history of the world, part Europe

Cinematic wankery at its most puerile. Two hours of the sun setting revealing that this is why it gets dark at night would not have been more pointless. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

The Childhood of a Leader is would-be deep cinematic wankery at its most puerile. This is a two-hour-long attempt to construct a metaphor that ends at a place where it steps back and smugly makes a “shocking” pronouncement of something so concretely literal that it is, well, literally the fact of the matter that everyone already knows. If actor turned director (and screenwriter, with Mona Fastvold) Brady Corbet had, with his feature debut, given us 120 minutes of the sun setting and then boldly concluded that this is why it gets dark at night, he would not have been more obvious and inevitable and pointless.
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Stream Scott Walker’s Score for ‘The Childhood of a Leader’

Whether you found Brady Corbet‘s The Childhood of a Leader a bold, thrilling view of latent European fascism or a formless exercise that fails to reach any notable point, we all probably came away with one common impression: the score is wild. Such an adjective is to be expected of its composer, Scott Walker, who’s primarily known for nightmarish, complex compositions that one can still enjoy as a forceful piece of music.

Consider that a) Walker’s only produced a handful of albums in the last twenty years and b) his only other contribution to film-soundtracking might be something of a masterpiece, and The Childhood of a Leader‘s score constitutes something of an event — in my own mind, at least. On this front, the full album does not disappoint. For as much as it’s been dubbed Hermann-esque, and as often as that does feel applicable, the thing,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Childhood of a Leader: what an indie film tells us about the roots of fascism

Brady Corbet’s directorial debut takes a chilling look at the DNA of a megalomaniac. He explains why it couldn’t be more timely in the age of Trump

The Childhood of a Leader, Brady Corbet’s film about the roots of a fascist megalomaniac, is loud. The orchestral score, by 1960s pop crooner-turned-avant garde hero Scott Walker, bludgeons you so hard it’s as if the sound levels have been hijacked. In actual fact they were. “We mixed it purposefully outside of the Dolby standard; it’s about 5% louder than is generally allowed,” says the 27-year-old director. “The Dolby guy came in to master it and I was like, ‘Cool, thanks a lot!’ Then he left and I was like, ‘Ok, turn it up!’ I like extremes. Growing up, I liked opera and I liked Fugazi. I liked anybody who gets to the end of the show and their knuckles are bleeding.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Childhood of a Leader: From Jean-Paul Sartre to Robert Pattinson

If actor-turned-director Brady Corbet’s post-World-War-i saga, The Childhood of a Leader, did little more than send American readers to Jean-Paul Sartre’s lesser known short story of the same name, one would be thanking the cinematic gods for its appearance.

The final story in his Sartre’s 1939 collection, The Wall, “The Childhood of a Leader” chronicles the life of Lucien from his rebellious potty training days as a lovely, long-haired tot, son of a rich industrialist, to his transformation into anti-Semitic murderer. There goes Holden Caulfield but for the grace of God.

When we first meet Lucien, with his lustrous blond curls and attired in a blue angel’s costume, he is mistaken by his mother’s consorts as a girl.

“What’s your name? Jacqueline, Lucienne, Margot?”

The embarrassed boy blushes and sets the record right, but “[h]e was no longer quite sure about not being a little
See full article at CultureCatch »

Movie Review: Fascism is a brat in The Childhood Of A Leader

Scott Walker’s score for The Childhood Of A Leader (only his second, after Pola X) is a work of dark, twisted genius, skin-crawling and bombastic in equal measure, and first-time director Brady Corbet does his damnedest trying to mount a movie to deserve it. And, mirabile dictu, he eventually pulls it off with the epilogue, a left turn into dystopian nightmare, titled “A New Era.” If only for a few minutes, The Childhood Of A Leader becomes its own film, a tour of the printing presses, paternoster elevators, and mazes of power that ends with a convulsive blur of bodies crowding in a public square. A viewer can’t help but think, “What took so long?”

Most of The Childhood Of A Leader is set in the aftermath of World War I at a dilapidated French manor house, shrouded in greenish medieval fog. Taking inspiration from the Jean-Paul Sartre
See full article at The AV Club »

Brady Corbet On His Directorial Debut ‘The Childhood of a Leader’ And The Problem With Movies Today

Brady Corbet On His Directorial Debut ‘The Childhood of a Leader’ And The Problem With Movies Today
First-time directors who swing for the fences with bold debut films can strike out hard, but actor-turned-director Brady Corbet’s “The Childhood of a Leader” is connecting in a big way.

The period drama premiered at last year’s Venice Film Festival, where Corbet took home the awards for Best Debut Feature and Best Director, and is being released Friday through IFC FilmsSundance Selects label. Corbet co-wrote the screenplay for the film with his partner Mona Fastvold.

Read More: ‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

A dark, post-World War I tale about the seven-year-old son of an American diplomat in France, the film’s largely European cast includes Bérénice Bejo (“The Artist”), Liam Cunningham (“Game of Thrones”) and Stacy Martin (“Nymphomaniac”). Robert Pattinson has a small but deceptively important role in the movie, which focuses on the young, manipulative
See full article at Indiewire »

UK poster and trailer for The Childhood of a Leader

With just a month to go until its release, a UK poster and trailer have arrived online for writer-director Brady Corbet’s upcoming mystery drama The Childhood of a Leader. Loosely based on the 1939 short story by Jean-Paul Sartre, the film marks the directorial debut of Corbet and features a cast that includes Robert Pattinson, Liam Cunningham and Bérénice Bejo; take a look below…

A child’s angelic face conceals a budding sociopath in the audacious, senses-shattering feature debut from actor Brady Corbet. A powerhouse international cast led by Robert Pattinson and Bérénice Bejo (The Artist) headlines this dark domestic nightmare. Set amidst the turmoil of World War I and its aftermath, it follows the young son of an American diplomat living in France as he learns to manipulate the adults around him—a monstrous coming of age that ominously parallels the rising tide of Fascism in Europe. A stylistically fearless tour-de-force,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Childhood Of A Leader Review

The Childhood of a Leader opens not on the angelic face of its sociopathic protagonist Prescott (Tom Sweet), but on real footage of the events that shape him. Bone-rattling music plays over silent films of the events surrounding the aftermath of World War I and the Treaty of Versailles, introducing the viewer to the film’s background and the formation of its protagonist’s identity. Prescott will be affected by these events, even if he does not play a part in them – his is a world of uncertainty, repression, and repressed violence, the perfect breeding ground for a fascist leader.

Brady Corbet’s feature film debut tells of a formative period in Prescott’s life. The son of an American diplomat and his globally educated wife (Liam Cunningham and Bérénice Bejo), he lives with his parents and a few servants in a rundown villa in a village outside of Paris.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Preview Scott Walker’s Score for ‘The Childhood of a Leader’

If Brady Corbet‘s The Childhood of a Leader hadn’t received plenty of early praise as a forceful, confident directorial debut from a perpetually interesting young actor, my eye would still be fixed on it for one reason: composer Scott Walker. The press-shy, not-exactly-prolific musician has a fanbase as narrow as it is dedicated — David Bowie may have been first and foremost among them, often considering him a North Star; just hear his reaction to a birthday wish for some idea — and his one contribution to film-scoring, on Leos Carax’s Pola X, is among the best anybody has produced in the last 20 years.

Though a recent convert, I consider myself among said fanbase, and so: whatever I come to make of it, The Childhood of a Leader earns credit for giving us a new, of-the-same-name Scott Walker album on August 19, ahead of which there’s now a very brief preview.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Trailer for The Childhood of a Leader starring Robert Pattinson and Liam Cunningham

Ahead of its U.S. release later this month, a trailer has arrived online for director Brady Corbet’s upcoming directorial debut The Childhood of a Leader which stars Robert Pattinson, Liam Cunningham and Bérénice Bejo; take a look below after the official synopsis…

A child’s angelic face conceals a budding sociopath in the audacious, senses-shattering feature debut from actor Brady Corbet. A powerhouse international cast led by Robert Pattinson and Bérénice Bejo (The Artist) headlines this dark domestic nightmare. Set amidst the turmoil of World War I and its aftermath, it follows the young son of an American diplomat living in France as he learns to manipulate the adults around him—a monstrous coming of age that ominously parallels the rising tide of Fascism in Europe. A stylistically fearless tour-de-force, The Childhood of a Leader reaches fever-pitch delirium thanks to ravishing cinematography and a thunderous score by legendary,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

U.S. Trailer For Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut ‘The Childhood of a Leader’

Actor Brady Corbet is making his transition to the other side of the camera with his directorial debut The Childhood of a Leader, based on a screenplay he penned with writer Mona Fastvold. Corbet has assembled quite the cast for this blend of drama, horror, and mystery, with Robert Pattinson, Bérénice Bejo, Liam Cunningham, Stacy Martin, and newcomer Tom Sweet. With 45 Years cinematographer Lol Crawley and an original score by Scott Walker, all the pieces are in line for an impressive debut.

Demonstrating its filmic grain under an unsettling orchestral score and one messed up family dynamic, this new U.S. trailer suggests Corbet has a strong visual eye for the unflinching and a real promise in the director’s chair. We said in our review, “For all its showiness, Childhood remains fluid and subtle in depicting the uncomfortable side of family relationships – thus nailing the central point of Jean-Paul Sartre
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck
A 27-year-old dude from Scottsdale, Arizona, Brady Corbet has somehow become the go-to guy for major European auteurs in need of a young American who can pick up what they’re putting down. We may never fully understand how he parlayed a one-episode cameo on “The King of Queens” and a recurring appearance in the fifth season of “24” into a series of brilliant collaborations with titans of international cinema like Michael Haneke (“Funny Games”) and Lars von Trier (“Melancholia”), but it’s clear why Corbet might have a special appreciation for how public figures are often seen through the lens of their beginnings. With his unusually accomplished directorial debut “Childhood of a Leader,” Corbet delivers a strange and startling film that reflects the unique trajectory of his career, as well as the influence of the iconoclastic directors with whom he’s already worked.

The first strains of Scott Walker’s panicky score slice into the soundtrack like Penderecki having a heart attack, the strings cutting into archival footage of World War I troops marching in formation. The opening titles are draped in terror, and they steel audiences for an ominous origin story on par with the horrors presaged by “Max” or “The Omen.” And on that promise, Corbet delivers — albeit it in his own elliptical, psychically tormented, and increasingly hypnotic way.

The Childhood of a Leader” tells the story of a young American boy (Tom Sweet) coming of age in a snowbound pocket of rural France circa 1918. His young yet severe mother (“The Artist” star Bérénice Bejo) is fed up with her son from the start, and takes out most of her frustration on the various employees who rear the boy for her by proxy. The child’s father (Liam Cunningham, who “Game of Thrones” fans will better recognize by the name of Davos Seaworth), is an assistant on President Wilson’s staff, and is often away in Versailles working on the peace treaty that would ultimately end the war. On the rare evenings during which he returns home, the boy’s father is sometimes accompanied by a widower politician played by Robert Pattinson (a glorified cameo during which he willfully melts into the musty furnishings of Corbet’s sets).

The film seldom ventures outside of the boy’s house, pushing deeper and deeper into the opaque void of its protagonist’s malleable young mind. Corbet’s doggedly anti-dramatic script (co-written by his partner, Mona Fastvold) stakes the boy’s future on a debate between nature vs. nurture in which neither side ever seems to earn a clear advantage. Sweet, whose character is outwardly defined by a blank expression and a head of flowing blond hair (he’s often confused for a girl), delivers a tense performance that often feels modeled after his director’s seething turns in “Simon Killer” and “Funny Games.” You almost never know what the kid is thinking, but it’s telling that his moments of paranoid anxiety are by far his most visceral — an early nightmare sequence suggests that Corbet has a natural talent for eerie visual abstractions.

Read More: Brady Corbet and Mona Fastvold Talk Moody Sundance Discovery ‘The Sleepwalker

He also has a natural talent for the strain of winking, comically exaggerated gravitas that makes it tempting to suspect that hyper-severe auteurs like Haneke and von Trier are actually just taking the piss. Ostentatiously divided into five sections (an overture, three ‘Tantrums,’ and a coda), and refusing to speak the boy’s name until late in the film (so that viewers might tie themselves into knots trying to work out which fascist leader the kid will grow up to become), “The Childhood of a Leader” pits the intensity of its context against the banality of its incident.

The first two Tantrums are all portent and no plot; the most exciting thing that happens is when the boy paws at the breast of his pretty young French tutor (“Nymphomaniac” ingenue Stacy Martin). There’s much talk of language skills, and fluency becomes its own kind of power, but how that factors into Corbet’s grand design is no better explicated than the fact that Sweet’s character is exclusively raised by hired help, or the tidbit that his dad had been hoping for a daughter. And yet, the raw anxiety of Corbet’s vision only grows more palpable as Sweet retreats further from our understanding; by the time the film reveals itself to be more of a mind-fuck than a historical drama, you’re too rattled to feel tricked.

On one hand, the indelibly disorienting final scene feels like a hit from behind; on the other, it feels as though the film has been building to it from the start. Either way, “The Childhood of a Leader” leaves behind a squall of unanswered questions that linger in the mind long after it squelches to a finish. Is this a story about the merits of Freudian psychology, or its limitations? Is it about the making of a monster, or is its distance meant to mock the thinking that sociopaths can be so easily explained? Early in the first Tantrum, Pattinson’s character lifts a quote that novelist John Fowles would ultimately coin in regards to the Holocaust: “That was the tragedy. Not that one man has the courage to be evil, but that so many have not the courage to be good.” Other than Corbet’s promise, that sentiment may be the film’s one clear takeaway: Whether born or raised, leaders are only as powerful as the people who neglect to stop them.

Grade: B+

The Childhood of a Leader” plays at BAMcinemaFest on June 23rd. It opens in theaters and on VOD on July 22nd.

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