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Beauty vs Beast: Burbank in the Bubble

Jason from Mnpp here - just this morning I wished director Peter Weir (one of my favorites) a happy 73rd birthday on my own site, and it struck me that hitting up his 1998 classic The Truman Show (which at almost 20 years old can rightly be considered a "classic" now, can't it? God I am old) would make for a very fine installment of our "Beauty vs Beast" series. On the left we have Jim Carrey's second greatest performance as the manic man in the bubble Truman Burbank, and on the right we have one of Laura Linney's funniest supporting turns as his pretend wife turned hostage Meryl. And I know you all lean Lovely Linney (as a religion) but it's awfully hard to root for Meryl if you ask me...

Previously I'm actually a little bit surprised that you guys gave last week's Strangers on a Train competion
See full article at FilmExperience »

Beauty vs Beast: Murder on the Orientation Express

Jason from Mnpp here with this week's "Beauty vs Beast" entertainment - I don't know if you've noticed by now that I will take any opportunity to talk about Alfred Hitchcock, but I will take any opportunity to talk about Alfred Hitchcock, and his birthday (which was yesterday) offers one of the best. Thankfully we've still plenty of choices - not many directors adored their villains like Hitch did, and so this series is a perfect fit.

And here's a good one! 1951's Strangers on a Train offers up one of Hitch's greatest bad guys in Bruno Antony, murder theorist and gay icon, played with giddy panache by Robert Walker. And Farley Granger's no slouch as the clearly-enticed-no-matter-how-hard-he-pretends-otherwise tennis-pro Guy Haines.

Previously It's one of her greatest roles so I'm not surprised that Joan Crawford stampeded her way to a win with last week's Johnny Guitar contest - she
See full article at FilmExperience »

Train of thought by Anne-Katrin Titze

Daniel Clowes had Patricia Highsmith and Alfred Hitchcock on his mind for Wilson: "He's like a different version of the Robert Walker character in Strangers on a Train …" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

A comment to director Craig Johnson and screenwriter/graphic novelist Daniel Clowes on Laura Dern's tattoos for her character Pippi in Wilson, led us to Robert Crumb, Tony Danza, Van Halen, and Pippi Longstocking. Woody Harrelson is Wilson, Pippi's ex-husband, and they have a daughter, Claire (Isabella Amara). Judy Greer plays Shelly, Wilson's dog sitter for Pepper and Cheryl Hines was once his sister-in-law.

Craig Johnson: "I like that in the Laura Dern version, Pippi is just this freckly faced, smiling can-do girl." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Not a shy man, Wilson likes to talk to all kinds of strangers. On an empty train, on the swing at the playground, in the men's room at an amusement park.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Vertigo Screens at The Hi-Pointe Saturday Morning – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, March 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list so here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are Alfred Hitchcock’s ten best films:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Judy by the Numbers: "Look For The Silver Lining"

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

Believe it or not, 1946 actually represented a change of pace in Judy Garland's career. Judy only had three credits to her name that year: one starring role (The Harvey Girls), one cameo delayed by reshoots (Ziegfeld Follies), and one appearance in a biopic (Till The Clouds Roll By). In fact, this change of pace was a conscious choice on the part of Mr. & Mrs. Minnelli. If Judy looks like she's glowing a bit more than usual under those arclights, that's because Judy Garland was pregnant.

 

 

The Movie: Till The Clouds Roll By (1946)

The Songwriter: Jerome Kern (music), Buddy G. DeSylva (lyrics)

The Players: Judy Garland, Robert Walker, Van Heflin, June Allyson, Lucille Bremer, directed by Richard Whorf & Vincente Minnelli 

The Story: Till The Clouds Roll By is a Jerome Kern biopic, which (in the true MGM style) fabricates
See full article at FilmExperience »

How Sound Film Technology Evolved in the Last Century: Interview with Former UCLA Film Preservationist Gitt

Hal Roach looks on as technicians install Vitaphone equipment in his studio screening room, ca. 1928. (Click on the image to enlarge it.) 'A Century of Sound': Q&A with former UCLA Preservation Officer Robert Gitt about the evolution of film sound technology Long before multi-track Dolby stereo and digital sound technology, there were the Kinetophone and the Vitaphone systems – not to mention organ and piano players at movie houses. Much of that is discussed in A Century of Sound, which chronicles the evolution of film sound from the late 19th century to the mid-1970s. A Century of Sound has been split into two parts, with a third installment currently in the planning stages. They are: Vol. 1, “The Beginning, 1876-1932,” which came out on DVD in 2007. Vol. 2, “The Sound of Movies: 1933-1975,” which came out on Blu-ray in 2015. The third installment will bring the presentation into the 21st century.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Beginning or the End

Stop! Don't touch that dial... if you like your atom-age propaganda straight up, MGM has the movie for you, an expensive 1946 docu-drama that became 'the official story' for the making of the bomb. The huge cast includes Brian Donlevy, Robert Walker, Tom Drake, Audrey Totter, Hume Cronyn, Hurd Hatfield, and Joseph Calleia. How trustworthy is the movie? It begins by showing footage of a time capsule being buried -- that supposedly contains the film we are watching. Think about that. Mom, Apple Pie, the Flag and God are enlisted to argume that we should stop worrying and love the fact that bombs are just peachy-keen dandy. The Beginning or the End DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1947 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 112 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Brian Donlevy, Robert Walker, Tom Drake, Beverly Tyler, Audrey Totter, Hume Cronyn, Hurd Hatfield, Joseph Calleia, Godfrey Tearle, Victor Francen,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blast from the Past: Cotillard Naked and Dead in Hitchcock Photo-Homage

Marion Cotillard 'Psycho' scream. Marion Cotillard in 'Psycho' A few years ago – more exactly, in Feb./March 2008 – Vanity Fair published a series of images honoring Alfred Hitchcock movies made in Hollywood. (His British oeuvre was completely ignored.) The images weren't from the movies themselves; instead, they were somewhat faithful recreations featuring early 21st century stars, including several of that year's Oscar nominees. And that's why you get to see above – and further below – Marion Cotillard recreating the iconic Psycho shower scene. Cotillard took home the Best Actress Oscar at the 2008 ceremony for her performance as Edith Piaf in Olivier Dahan's La Vie en Rose / La môme. Janet Leigh, the original star of Hitchcock's Psycho, was shortlisted for the 1960 Best Supporting Actress Oscar, but lost to another good-girl-gone-bad, Shirley Jones as a sex worker in Richard Brooks' Elmer Gantry. More nudity, less horror Looking at the Marion Cotillard Psycho images,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Daily | Varda, Maddin, Selznick

In today's roundup: David Bordwell on Agnès Varda, Guy Maddin on walking and making collages, the unlikely connection between Orson Welles and the New Queer Cinema of the early 90s, the Chiseler on Mae Busch and Larry Tucker, Patti Smith on Bob Dylan and Karina Longworth on David O. Selznick, Jennifer Jones and Robert Walker. Plus: Deniz Gamze Ergüven’s Mustang wins this year's Lux Prize, two new projects for Lee Daniels, Werner Herzog's Rogue Film School is heading to Munich and Richard Linklater will be discussing Luis Buñuel's Los Olvidados in Austin tonight. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Down to her last cigarette by Anne-Katrin Titze

Todd Haynes on Cate Blanchett as Carol: "Smoking is the perfect sort of conductor of desire …"

At the Carol press conference inside the Jw Marriott Essex House, on Central Park South, attended by Cate Blanchett, Rooney Mara, Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson and Jake Lacy, director Todd Haynes connected smoking to Hollywood's Golden Age Cinema. Screenwriter Phyllis Nagy spoke about Patricia Highsmith's dislike of Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers On A Train and fondness for Robert Walker and Alain Delon in René Clément's Plein Soleil (Purple Noon).

Carol, adapted from Highsmith's The Price Of Salt, costumes by Sandy Powell (The Wolf Of Wall Street), music by Carter Burwell (Anomalisa), cinematography by Ed Lachman (Ulrich Seidl's Paradise: Love, Paradise: Faith, Paradise: Hope) had its World Premiere at the Cannes Film Festival and was screened in the 53rd New York Film Festival last month.

Carol dancing with her husband Harge
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Walker on TCM: From Shy, Heterosexual Boy-Next-Door to Sly, Homosexual Sociopath

Robert Walker: Actor in MGM films of the '40s. Robert Walker: Actor who conveyed boy-next-door charms, psychoses At least on screen, I've always found the underrated actor Robert Walker to be everything his fellow – and more famous – MGM contract player James Stewart only pretended to be: shy, amiable, naive. The one thing that made Walker look less like an idealized “Average Joe” than Stewart was that the former did not have a vacuous look. Walker's intelligence shone clearly through his bright (in black and white) grey eyes. As part of its “Summer Under the Stars” programming, Turner Classic Movies is dedicating today, Aug. 9, '15, to Robert Walker, who was featured in 20 films between 1943 and his untimely death at age 32 in 1951. Time Warner (via Ted Turner) owns the pre-1986 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer library (and almost got to buy the studio outright in 2009), so most of Walker's movies have
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Hiroshima 70th Anniversary: Six Must-Watch Movies Remembering the A-Bomb Terror

'The Beginning or the End' 1947 with Robert Walker and Tom Drake. Hiroshima bombing 70th anniversary: Six movies dealing with the A-bomb terror Seventy years ago, on Aug. 6, 1945, the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Ultimately, anywhere between 70,000 and 140,000 people died – in addition to dogs, cats, horses, chickens, and most other living beings in that part of the world. Three days later, America dropped a second atomic bomb, this time over Nagasaki. Human deaths in this other city totaled anywhere between 40,000-80,000. For obvious reasons, the evisceration of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been a quasi-taboo in American films. After all, in the last 75 years Hollywood's World War II movies, from John Farrow's Wake Island (1942) and Mervyn LeRoy's Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944) to Steven Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan (1998) and Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor (2001), almost invariably have presented a clear-cut vision
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Psycho': 25 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About Hitchcock's Classic

Besides making people forever afraid of motel-room showers, Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" continues to have an incalculable impact on popular culture. Though it was released 55 years ago this week (on June 16, 1960), it continues to inspire filmmakers and TV producers. In just the last three years, we've seen the 2012 film "Hitchcock" (based on Stephen Rebello's book "Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of 'Psycho,'" and starring Anthony Hopkins as the director and Scarlett Johansson as Janet Leigh) and the ongoing A&E TV prequel drama series, "Bates Motel."

Still, for all of the "Psycho" trivia revealed in "Hitchcock," the biopic barely scratches the surface of how the film got made, from the men who inspired the invention of Norman Bates, to the trickery Hitchcock used to tease the press while keeping the film's convention-shredding narrative twists a secret, to the film's unlikely connection to "Leave It to Beaver." Here,
See full article at Moviefone »

The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143) Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

What I Watched, What You Watched #281

I got around to a lot more movies this week, beginning with last Sunday evening where I caught Die Hard and Die Hard with a Vengeance on Encore. I know everyone pretty much loves Die Hard, but I'm not sure I don't love With a Vengeance a little more, I just love Samuel L. Jackson in that movie and Jeremy Irons is a perfect villain. Things took a bit of a dip when I went to the theater to watch The Boy Next Door, but I quickly resolved that with It Happened One Night, which became my latest Best Movies entry. Then I got a hankering to watch Strangers on a Train after it was recently announced David Fincher, Ben Affleck and Gillian Flynn were looking to put together a remake. I was also thinking it might become Best Movies entry #9, but after watching it and Robert Walker's performance
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

David Fincher and Gillian Flynn Team Up for 'Strangers On a Train' Remake

Margaret here, recovering from yesterday's Oscars nominations and trying to process some upcoming movie news: David Fincher and Gillian Flynn are remaking Strangers On a TrainDavid Fincher and Gillian Flynn are remaking Strangers On a Train

 

 

There are so many feelings, and I am feeling All of them, all at once, right now. Help. Excitement: David Fincher and Gillian Flynn together again, and so soon!! Indifference: Ben Affleck is also involved, which, sure. Anger: A remake of Strangers On a Train? How dare they?? Hitchcock at his best is untouchable and the movie is perfect; no sane human could think it needs updating! Cautious Optimism: But. Buuuuut. If they're going to do to it, and you can't stop them.. The Flynn and Fincher team is such a great choice. Think of the cold, agonizing tension! Think of the pitch-black comedy! We deserve this. Confusion: But Strangers on a Train
See full article at FilmExperience »

Ben Affleck and David Fincher Sign on to Remake Hitchcock's 'Strangers'

Ben Affleck and David Fincher Sign on to Remake Hitchcock's 'Strangers'
The Gone Girl team of director David Fincher, screenwriter Gillian Flynn and actor Ben Affleck have already set their sights on their next project: Strangers, a modern take on Alfred Hitchcock's 1951 suspense classic Strangers on a Train, according to Deadline.

In the Hitchcock original, the plot revolves a murder pact between a tennis star (played by Farley Granger) and the titular stranger on a train (portrayed by Robert Walker). Aboard, they devise a plan to kill the source of each other's problems – the tennis star's ex-wife, the stranger's father
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Affleck, Fincher to reteam for Strangers on a Train remake

  • Cineplex
Ben Affleck and David Fincher are reteaming for a remake of Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train.

On the heels of their box-office hit Gone Girl, the star and the director will reunite for a film based on the 1951 classic in which two strangers meet on a train and conspire to carry out murders for one another. Gone Girl scribeGillian Flynn is expected to write the screenplay, which originally came from Patricia Highsmith's novel.

Hitchcock's film stars Farley Granger as tennis star Guy Haines who engages in a "criss-cross" murder swap with a stranger named Bruno (Robert Walker).  Bruno agrees to kill Haines' wife and in exchange, Haines will kill Bruno's father.  Since they are strangers with no link between them other than this fateful train ride, they will not be placed under police scrutiny as suspects.

 

Fincher's thriller is to move the initial meeting to a plane.
See full article at Cineplex »

David Fincher to Helm, Ben Affleck to Star in Remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train

  • DailyDead
Psychological scares and an increasingly disturbing atmosphere made Gone Girl one of the year’s most unsettling theatrical releases. If you enjoyed the potent combination of David Fincher in the director’s chair, Gillian Flynn scribing the screenplay, and Ben Affleck in the lead role for Gone Girl, then you may be pleased to hear that the trio are looking to come together once again for a remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s classic 1951 film, Strangers on a Train.

According to Deadline, David Fincher will direct and Ben Affleck will star in Strangers, a Warner Bros. reimagining of Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train (which in turn is based on Patricia Highsmith’s 1950 novel of the same name), with Gillian Flynn in talks to pen the project. Affleck will portray “a movie star – in the middle of a campaign for an Oscar during awards season – whose private plane breaks down and
See full article at DailyDead »

'Strangers on a Train' Reteams Ben Affleck & David Fincher

'Strangers on a Train' Reteams Ben Affleck & David Fincher
Ben Affleck is re-teaming with Gone Girl director David Fincher and author/screenwriter Gillian Flynn for a remake of the 1951 Alfred Hitchcock thriller Strangers on a Train for Warner Bros. Gillian Flynn is in talks to write the screenplay, with Ben Affleck producing through his Pearl Street company. While the project will be based on the original Strangers on a Train, which was adapted from Patricia Highsmith's novel, it will have a contemporary setting with a new twist.

The story will revolve around Ben Affleck's character, a movie star in the middle of an Oscar campaign, whose private plane breaks down. He is given a lift to L.A. on another plane by a wealthy stranger. The original starred Farley Granger as a tennis pro who becomes bored with his life and marriage and is contemplating divorce. Instead, he meets a wealthy socialite who proposes the idea of
See full article at MovieWeb »
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