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Hell and salvation in the films of Christopher Nolan

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In the logical, rational films of Christopher Nolan, heroes often make a mythical journey into the land of the dead, Ryan writes...

Christopher Nolan stands in front of a chalk board, carefully scratching out a network of lines and arrows. He's attempting to describe the complex structure of Memento, his second film, which cuts between two intertwining stories - one told in a conventional order, the other told in reverse.

"Most movies present a quite comfortable universe," Nolan says, standing in front of his odd hairpin-shaped diagram, "where we're given an objective truth that we don't get in everyday life. That's one of the reasons we go to the movies."

For many, Memento was their first encounter with Nolan's style of filmmaking, which seems fixated on the precise and the concrete. He favours the use of celluloid and practical, in-camera effects. Like Stanley Kubrick before him, Nolan
See full article at Den of Geek »

The link between Batman Begins, Training Day & Karate Kid 3

What do Batman Begins, Training Day and The Karate Kid, Part III all have in common? Ryan explains...

Nb: The following contains mild spoilers for Batman Begins, Training Day and The Karate Kid, Part III.

In The Karate Kid, it's Mr Miyagi. In Back To The Future, it's Doc Brown. In X-Men, it's Professor Xavier. The mentor is a familiar archetype in the movies, and it's a device which is as old as storytelling itself.

The mentor is commonly characterised as a wise, usually much older being who provides wisdom and useful objects to a story's hero or heroine. The Star Wars movies have introduced numerous mentor figures in the entries released so far: dignified old Jedi knight Obi-Wan Kenobi, the benevolent Yoda and Qui-Gon Jinn, the mentor for a young Obi-Wan in The Phantom Menace.

In each instance, we see the mentor provide their students with teaching and gifts
See full article at Den of Geek »

Candelabra to open Deauville

Candelabra to open Deauville
Director Steven Soderbergh to give cinema lesson. Producer Gale Anne Hurd to be feted by festival.

The Deauville American Festival has announced the line-up of its 39th edition running August 30 to September 8.

Jim Mickle’s cannibal picture We Are What We Are, Matt Creed’s debut feature Lily,about a young woman re-evaluating her life following cancer, and Destin Cretton’s children’s home drama Short Term 12 are among the 12 titles screening in competition.

Roughly half the competing pictures are looking for French distribution including Drake Doremus’ family drama Breath In, represented by Qed Film Sales, and Lily, which is handled by producers Up the River Films and Verisimiltude.

As in previous years, the festival hosted on the northern coast of France is laying on a dedicated screening space – the Deauville American Film Corner – for film professionals.

Steven Soderbergh’s critically acclaimed Liberace bio-pic Behind The Candelabra, which yesterday picked up 15 Emmy nominations, will open the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Candelabra to open Deauville 2013

Candelabra to open Deauville 2013
Director Steven Soderbergh to give cinema lesson. Producer Gale Anne Hurd to be feted by festival.

The Deauville American Festival has announced the line-up of its 39th edition running August 30 to September 8.

Jim Mickle’s cannibal picture We Are What We Are, Matt Creed’s debut feature Lily,about a young woman re-evaluating her life following cancer, and Destin Cretton’s children’s home drama Short Term 12 are among the 12 titles screening in competition.

Roughly half the competing pictures are looking for French distribution including Drake Doremus’ family drama Breath In, represented by Qed Film Sales, and Lily, which is handled by producers Up the River Films and Verisimiltude.

As in previous years, the festival hosted on the northern coast of France is laying on a dedicated screening space – the Deauville American Film Corner – for film professionals.

Steven Soderbergh’s critically acclaimed Liberace bio-pic Behind The Candelabra, which yesterday picked up 15 Emmy nominations, will open the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Steven Soderbergh’s ‘Behind the Candelabra’ Opens Deauville Fest

Steven Soderbergh’s ‘Behind the Candelabra’ Opens Deauville Fest
Steven Soderbergh’s “Behind the Candelabra” is set to kick off the Deauville American Film Festival on Aug. 30.

Deauville’s special screenings include Woody Allen’s “Blue Jasmine,” Roland Emmerich’s “White House Down,” Naomi Foner’s “Very Good Girls” and David Gordon Green’s “Joe,” Ron Howard’s “Rush,” Mark Steven Johnson’s “Killing Season” and Quentin Dupieux’s “Wrong Cops.”

A trio of Hollywood stars Cate Blanchett (“Blue Jasmine”), John Travolta (“Killing Season”) and Nicolas Cage (“Joe”) will be celebrated at the fest, along with American vet producer Gale Anne Hurd, whose career spans over 30 years and include such cult pics as “Terminator,” “Aliens” and “The Incredible Hulk,” as well as acclaimed AMC drama skein “The Walking Dead.”

A posthumous homage will be given in the memory of multi-hyphenate entertainer Danny Kaye.

Other high-profile guests include Soderbergh, who will be in Deauville to present ”Candelabra” and will also give a masterclass,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Call for Entry: Scriptwriter’s workshop Puglia Experience 2013

Call for Entry: Scriptwriter’s workshop Puglia Experience 2013
“Puglia Experience 2013”, an itinerant scriptwriting workshop for professional scriptwriters from all over the world is calling for applications. Deadline for applications is Tuesday 30th April 2013, at 11:59 p.m. Cet.

The workshop will take place from 17th June – 6th July 2013 in the Apulia Region of Italy. It will take about sixteen participants, up to a quarter of places available are reserved for candidates born or resident in Apulia.

All expenses related to travel, accommodation and food are covered in their entirety by the Apulia Film Commission Foundation.

The main tutor of the workshop is the scriptwriter James V. Hart, author of many films, such as “Bram Stoker’s Dracula” by Francis Ford Coppola and assisted by special guests as Claire Dobbin, international script editor, chairperson of the Melbourne International Film Festival and Christopher Vogler, veteran story consultant for major Hollywood film companies and author of “The Writer’s Journey” and
See full article at DearCinema.com »

7 Movie Villains That You’ll Genuinely Feel Sorry For

The villain. The rival. The antithesis. All very apt descriptions of an antagonist in the art of storytelling. In The Writer’s Journey, Christopher Vogler defines the villain as the “hero of his own myth”. He brings up Adolf Hitler and how he had a “sincere belief that he was right, even heroic”, which is a very effective metaphor when one looks back at some of the most colorful villains in cinematic history.

The Joker in The Dark Knight, Hans Landa in Inglorious Basterds, and Gordon Gekko in Wall Street are recent examples that constantly rank up there amongst greatest villains of all time. As in Vogler’s description, would these characters be as memorable without their schemes and morals? Absolutely not, since their detailed agendas are what separate these compelling villains from the mundane. But however interesting the characters may be, cinemagoers are intended to label these characters as

Darren Aronofsky’S Top 5 Books On The Movies

Over at The Browser, Black Swan director Darren Aronofsky names and discusses his top five books on films and filmmaking. There’s an obvious one (Sidney Lumet’s Making Movies), an unexpected autobiography (Kirk Douglas’s The Ragman’s Son), and then the following screenplay tome. From Aronofsky’s piece:

The Writer’s Journey, Christopher Vogler. It’s the Bible for screenwriters. I think it’s the best book on how to write a screenplay ever written. It helped me get through so many roadblocks as a writer.

Vogler adapted the work of Joseph Campbell, an American academic, to the art of screenwriting. Vogler’s approach to screenwriting was based on Campbell’s theory that, because of myths, the arc of a hero’s journey was a story ingrained deeply inside all of us. I really incorporated his ideas and techniques into how I structured films—I referred to it a lot.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

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