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The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

Jacques Demy’s international breakthrough musical gives us Catherine Deneuve and wall-to-wall Michel Legrand pop-jazz — it’s a different animal than La La Land but they’re being compared anyway. The story of a romance without a happily-ever-after is doggedly naturalistic, despite visuals as bright and buoyant as an old MGM show.

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 716

1964 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 92 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Les parapluies de Cherbourg / Street Date April 11, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Catherine Deneuve, Nino Castelnuovo, Anne Vernon, Marc Michel, Ellen Farner, Mireille Perrey, Jean Champion.

Cinematography: Jean Rabier

Production design:Bernard Evein

Film Editors: Anne-Marie Cotret, Monique Teisseire

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Produced by Mag Bodard

Written and Directed by Jacques Demy

What with all the hubbub about last year’s Oscar favorite La La Land, I wonder if Hollywood will be trotting out more retro-nostalgia, ‘let’s put on a show’ musical fantasy fare.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Remembering Actress Simon Part 2 - Deadly Sex Kitten Romanced Real-Life James Bond 'Inspiration'

Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine' 1938: Jean Renoir's film noir (photo: Jean Gabin and Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine') (See previous post: "'Cat People' 1942 Actress Simone Simon Remembered.") In the late 1930s, with her Hollywood career stalled while facing competition at 20th Century-Fox from another French import, Annabella (later Tyrone Power's wife), Simone Simon returned to France. Once there, she reestablished herself as an actress to be reckoned with in Jean Renoir's La Bête Humaine. An updated version of Émile Zola's 1890 novel, La Bête Humaine is enveloped in a dark, brooding atmosphere not uncommon in pre-World War II French films. Known for their "poetic realism," examples from that era include Renoir's own The Lower Depths (1936), Julien Duvivier's La Belle Équipe (1936) and Pépé le Moko (1937), and particularly Marcel Carné's Port of Shadows (1938) and Daybreak (1939).[11] This thematic and
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

A Look Back at the Cannes Palme D’Or Winners from the 60s: ‘The Umbrellas of Cherbourg’

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

Written and directed by Jacques Demy

France, 1964

Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Busby Berkeley, Vincente Minnelli, Arthur Freed: names synonymous with the movie musical. Missing from this standard list is a key contributor to the form, the French director Jacques Demy. Perhaps part of the reason for his widespread unfamiliarity, even to those who adore the genre, is that Demy only directed a handful of musicals in his entire career. It’s also likely that the musical is simply thought of as an American type of movie, and therefore, “foreign” practitioners don’t quite warrant similar attention. In either case, Demy did amplify the genre with at least two major works, one of them the recipient of the Palme d’Or at the 1964 Cannes Film Festival. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, which also received four Academy Award nominations (at least some American love there), is not just an exceptional musical,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg 50th Anniversary Blu-ray Review

Director: Jacques Demy,

Starring: Catherine Deneuve, Nino Castelnuovo, Anne Vernon, Marc Michel, Ellen Farner, Mireille Perrey,

Running Time: 91 Minutes

Certificate: 15

Extras: Geoff Andrew on Umbrellas Of Cherbourg, Virginie Ledoyen on Umbrellas Of Cherbourg, Once Upton A Time… The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg, The World Of Jacques Demy, The Restoration of The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg, Stills Gallery, Trailer, Trailer (2013), Audio Interview with Catherine Deneuve,

In the extras for The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg, director Jacques Demy declares he wanted to make a film to make people cry. No doubt he will succeed at making many do so thanks to this decadent and turbulent story of first love set over 7 years. Funnily enough though, Demy also decides to make it an incredibly bright and colourful affair in which every line of dialogue is sung rather than spoken.

To celebrate its 50th anniversary, The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg is presented in this beautifully restored Blu-ray that
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Day to Rejoice: Deneuve Is Today's TCM Star

Catherine Deneuve: Style, beauty, and talent on TCM tonight A day to rejoice on Turner Classic Movies: Catherine Deneuve, one of the few true Living Film Legends, is TCM’s "Summer Under the Stars" star today, August 12, 2013. Catherine Deneuve is not only one of the most beautiful film actresses ever, she’s also one of the very best. In fact, the more mature her looks, the more fascinating she has become. Though, admittedly, Deneuve has always been great to look at, and she has been a mesmerizing screen presence since at least the early ’80s. ‘The Umbrellas of Cherbourg’: One of the greatest movie musicals ever Right now, TCM is showing one of the greatest movie musicals ever made, Jacques Demy’s Palme d’Or winner The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964), in which a very blonde, very young, very pretty, and very dubbed Catherine Deneuve (singing voice by Danielle Licari
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

DVD Review: Terror on a Train

  • Cinelinx
Cinelinx punches its ticket for the classic thriller Terror on a Train, now on DVD from Warner Archive!

This Warner Archive release is a Manufacture-On-Demand (Mod) DVD. It is made to be played in "play only" DVD devices, and may not play in some DVD recorders or PC drives. This disc, however, played fine in the Toshiba DVD recorder used for this review. This title is available directly from WBShop.com by clicking here.

The Set-up

When a plot to bomb a British supply train is discovered, an American bomb disposal expert Peter Lyncort (Glenn Ford) is called upon to disarm it.

Directed by Ted Tetzlaff 

The Delivery

The 1952 film Terror on a Train (also released as Time Bomb) sounds like a Hitchcockian thriller, and with veteran actor Glenn Ford in the lead, the premise sounds promising. In World War II-era England, a German saboteur has planted a powerful bomb on a munitions train,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Tiff Cinematheque presents a Summer in France: ‘The Umbrellas of Cherbourg’; Singin’ French in the Rain

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

Directed by Jacques Demy

Written by Jacques Demy

France, 1964

There’s a bloke from Germany that can run the 100-metre dash in 13.6 seconds. He can also run the 200-metre in 31.56 seconds. There’s another lad who can run the 400-metre in 69.56 seconds. He’s also German.

The main concern regarding the two aforementioned tidbits is not the fact that they share common citizenship. No, the point of interest is their running time in the three events.

Although a tad underwhelming at first glance, and a bit unimpressive when compared to Olympic and world records, further context would render their achievements much more admirable.

For you see, they sprinted backwards.

One might ask the inevitable question of ‘why’. Running backwards is a contrived act of difficulty, is largely a gimmick with no substantial improvement to the form, and is generally overlooked as both. But despite all that,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

DVD Review: Criterion Adds Roberto Rossellini, Andrzej Wajda Films to Collection

DVD Rating: 3.5/5.0 Chicago – The Criterion Collection expanded by two titles recently and fans of Andrzej Wajda and Roberto Rossellini will be happy to see two of their films in slots #463 and #464 in the most acclaimed series of DVDs in the history of the format. Rossellini’s “Il Generale Della Rovere” and Wajda’s “Danton” might not be as high-profile films as some recent Criterion releases, but they have been given the typically spectacular treatment that this company has been known for over the years.

Rossellini’s “Il Generale Della Rovere” is a transition film from one of the fathers of neorealism’s more human films of the ’40s and ’50s to his historically-based work of the ’60s and ’70s. The director is still most known for that early period with “Rome, Open City” being required viewing for anyone with the guts to call themselves a film historian.

Danton was released
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

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