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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

1-20 of 43 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Gale Ann Hurd Among Newly-Named AMPAS SciTech Council Members

30 September 2014 11:40 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Producer Gale Ann Hurd, cinematographer John Bailey, visual effects supervisor John Knoll and editor Michael Tronick have joined the Science and Technology Council of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. This brings the 2014–2015 Council to 25 members. It's co-chaired by Craig Barron, an Oscar-winning VFX supervisor and former Academy governor; and Paul Debevec, chief visual officer at the USC Institute for Creative Technologies. Hurd's credits include Aliens, The Terminator, The Abyss, and TV series The Walking Dead. She is CEO of her Valhalla Motion Pictures. Read more VFX Legend Douglas Trumbull's Plan to Save the Movies

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- Carolyn Giardina

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Movie News - New 3D Technology for 4K for Avatar Sequels

17 September 2014 | National Ledger | See recent National Ledger news »

Movie News - The 'Avatar' sequels could use Douglas Trumbull's new system for 4K 3D at 120 frames per second. Trumbull has confirmed the news in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, in which he revealed that James Cameron - who wrote and directed the original film in 2009 - is intrigued by cutting-edge technology. He said: ''I know that Cameron admired Showscan [Trumbull's earlier invention of a large-format high-frame rate projection system] and that he is a huge advocate of high frame rates [HFRs].'' He added: ''The use of HFRs for 'Avatar' would be very appropriate and very successful. ''I don't know if Cameron is interested [in using Magi for the Avatar sequels]. He's in seclusion writing the screenplay for Avatar. I am talking to [series producer] Jon Landau, and we plan to have a screening [of Ufotog] soon.'' What's more, Trumball said he's also in talks with other directors about Magi. He explained: ''It »

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New Avatar 2,3 & 4 Possible Groundbreaking Filming Details Revealed

16 September 2014 2:12 PM, PDT | OnTheFlix | See recent OnTheFlix news »

According to a new report from Comicbookmovie.com, some new, possible groundbreaking, filming details have been revealed for the upcoming "Avatar" 2,3 & 4 films that are currently planned for some point in the future. It turns out that visual effects legend, Douglas Trumbull, told The Hollywood Reporter that he's currently met up with Avatar producer, John Landau, to discuss shooting Avatar in 120 frames-per-second, which is well above the standard 24 frames-per-second. It turns out that since movies are shot digitally these days, it is very possible to shoot them at 120 frames-per-second. Douglas said: "I know that Cameron admired Showscan Trumbull's earlier invention of a large-format high-frame rate projection system and that he is a huge advocate of high frame rates HFRs. The use of HFRs for Avatar would be very appropriate and very successful. I don't know if Cameron is interested in using Magi for the Avatar sequels. He's in seclusion writing the screenplay for Avatar. »

- Eric

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Is James Cameron Prepping To Film Avatar Sequels In 4K 3D?

16 September 2014 12:49 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

In cinematic circles, James Cameron and bleeding-edge technology go hand in hand. Whether it’s overseeing the construction of the world’s largest indoor water tank for Titanic back in 1997 or pushing the envelope for Avatar with ultra-realistic motion capture, the filmmaker likes to establish his own filmic parameters.

And now, it seems as though Cameron is eyeing up the possibility of shooting the Avatar sequels in full 4K resolution through the use of Douglas Trumbull’s patented gizmo, Magi — an experimental process that renders the image in 4K 3D at 120 frames per second.

Speaking with The Hollywood Reporter, Trumbull states that discussions are currently ongoing with Avatar producer Jon Landau. Here’s what the visual effects maestro had to say:

“I know that Cameron admired Showscan [Trumbull's earlier invention of a large-format high-frame rate projection system] and that he is a huge advocate of high frame rates [HFRs]. The use of HFRs for Avatar would be very appropriate and very successful. »

- Michael Briers

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James Cameron To Film ‘Avatar’ Sequels At 120fps?

16 September 2014 9:22 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Remember when The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey came out? Remember the while who-ha in regards to film being shot at a whopping 48-frames-per-second? The world was in uproar as to why the new technology was being used, despite the fact that you could march on down to your local multiplex and still have the choice of viewing the film in the new higher frame rate format or the old 24-frames-per-second one. Very much like you have a choice of viewing a film in 2D or 3D. Well, as much as Peter Jackson got excited about projecting at a higher frame rate, another has gone one step further? James Cameron.

The word around the campfire is that Cameron’s people are holding meetings with tech folk about potentially screening the two planned Avatar sequels at a huge 120-frames-per-second. Take that Internet. A guy named Douglas Trumbull has developed a new way of projecting a 3D, »

- Paul Heath

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The Weird, Futuristic Technology The Avatar Sequels May Use

16 September 2014 5:13 AM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Filmmaker James Cameron loves creating and using state of the art technology to make his films. The Terminator director was one of the driving forces behind the re-emergence of 3D, taking technology that was once regarded as gimmicky and making it a mainstay of modern blockbusters. He.s also been a huge proponent of making films at a higher framerate . and there.s currently nothing out there that.s bigger and better than Douglas Trumbull.s Magi process for achieving that goal. Could Cameron.s Avatar sequels take advantage of this new tech and make it mainstream? This is the question raised in a THR piece on Trumbull. The inventor reports that he.s spoken with Avatar producer Jon Landau about getting Cameron to view Ufotog, a short film designed to show off the new tech. So, what is Magi? It.s basically a system that shows films in 3D »

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Could the Avatar sequels be projected at 120 frames per second?

16 September 2014 4:33 AM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

For those of you who actually dug the Hobbit films at 48 frames per second, a man by the name of Douglas Trumbull has developed a 4K 3D format that can be projected at 120 fps on conventional digital projectors. Trumbull has spoken with Avatar producer Jon Landau about possibly using this format for the Avatar sequels, and has scheduled a screening of the short film Ufotog, which utilizes this format (dubbed Magi). Trumbull had this to say: I know that Cameron is a huge advocate of high »

- Sean Wist

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"Avatar" Sequels Could Be 4K & 120Fps?

15 September 2014 6:49 PM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

VFX veteran Douglas Trumbull has revealed that he's had discussions with James Cameron's producing partner Jon Landau about potentially using Trumbull's Magi technology on the upcoming "Avatar" sequels.

Trumbull has developing a filming system that shoots 4K 3D at 120 frames per second, one that could overcome some of the issues with Peter Jackson's "The Hobbit" films which were shot at 48 frames per second rather than the 24 frames per second of standard film. Trumbull tells THR:

"I know that Cameron admired Showscan and that he is a huge advocate of high frame rates [HFRs]. The use of HFRs for Avatar would be very appropriate and very successful. I don't know if Cameron is interested [in using Magi for the Avatar sequels]. He's in seclusion writing the screenplay for Avatar . I am talking to Jon Landau, and we plan to have a screening [of Ufotog] soon."

"Ufotog" refers to a ten minute, demonstrative and experimental sci-fi adventure film which showcases the technology. »

- Garth Franklin

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James Cameron May Shoot 'Avatar' Sequels at 120 Fps

15 September 2014 2:22 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Director Peter Jackson helped push the envelope of frame rate technology by presenting The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug in the high frame rate (Hfr) of 48 frames per second, double the industry standard of 24 Fps. Now it seems filmmaker James Cameron may go even further with his upcoming Avatar sequels, Avatar 2, Avatar 3 and Avatar 4 by filming at 120 frames per second.

Douglas Trumbull, who developed a 4K 3D system that is shot at 120 Fps dubbed Magi, revealed in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter that he has spoken with James Cameron's producing partner Jon Landau about using this technology on the Avatar follow-ups. Here's what Douglas Trumbull had to say about setting up a screening of his short film Utofog, which showcases the Magi technology.

"I know that Cameron admired Showscan [Trumbull's earlier invention of a large-format high-frame rate projection system] and that he is a huge advocate of high frame »

- MovieWeb

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Avatar Sequels Could Break New Ground With 120 Frames-Per-Second

15 September 2014 12:12 PM, PDT | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

72-year-old visual effects legend, Douglas Trumbull, has spent decades "looking for the future of movies" with an emphasis on higher frame rates. 24 frames-per-second has been the standard for films since it offered optimal sound clarity, but that was when most movies were shot on film. Now that digital has taken over synch sound recording isn't an obstacle. Trumbull, who has believed for a long time that higher frame rates equals higher enjoyment for the audience is pushing for 120 frames-per-second and has even produced a short film, Ufotog, to prove his point. But which feature film will be the guinea pig? Could it be James Cameron's Avatar sequels? Maybe. Trumbull will be screening his short film to Avatar producer Jon Landau. “I know that Cameron admired Showscan [Trumbull's earlier invention of a large-format high-frame rate projection system] and that he is a huge advocate of high frame rates [HFRs],” Trumbull said. “The »

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Trumbull: Super Hfr could revitalise cinema

15 September 2014 5:41 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Ibc: VFX veteran Douglas Trumbull claims the groundbreaking technology could revitalise the theatrical experience.

Director and VFX veteran Douglas Trumbull has urged filmmakers James Cameron, J.J Abrams and Peter Jackson to adopt his groundbreaking super high frame rate 3D production and presentation format in a bid to revitalise the theatrical experience.

At a screening of his experimental short Ufotog, shot in 3D at 4K resolution and at 120 frames a second, projected for the first time using Christie Digital’s 3D 6P laser projection system at trade show Ibc today, Trumbull called on exhibitors and directors to embrace the format.

“Right now the technical standards of cinema are almost identical to the technology standard of TV,” he said.

“There is very little difference between those two mediums and young people in particular are migrating away from movies because of the convenience of watching movies on a tablet.

“But if we can make an immersive motion picture spectacle »

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Will Avatar sequels use new high frame rate 4K 3D system?

15 September 2014 5:08 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

James Cameron's Avatar sequels could use Douglas Trumbull's new system for 4K 3D at 120 frames per second.

The filmmaker and inventor has discussed the new system with Avatar series producer Jon Landau, he told The Hollywood Reporter.

Landau has requested a screening of short film Ufotog, which is being used as a showcase for the Magi process.

"I know that Cameron admired Showscan [Trumbull's earlier invention of a large-format high-frame rate projection system] and that he is a huge advocate of high frame rates [HFRs]," said Trumbull.

"The use of HFRs for Avatar would be very appropriate and very successful.

"I don't know if Cameron is interested [in using Magi for the Avatar sequels]. He's in seclusion writing the screenplay for Avatar. I am talking to Jon Landau, and we plan to have a screening [of Ufotog] soon."

Trumbull has said that he is in talks with other directors about Magi.

"It delivers extreme fluidity of motion and amazing clarity with no strobing, no double flickering and a viewing »

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Could 'Avatar' Sequels Be First Features to Use Douglas Trumbull's High Frame Rate 4K 3D System?

15 September 2014 2:53 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Could James Cameron's Avatar sequels become the first features to be produced and exhibited using Douglas Trumbull's developing system for 4K 3D at 120 frames per second (fps)? Trumbull told The Hollywood Reporter he has talked with Avatar producer Jon Landau about viewing the short film Utofog, which is a showcase for Trumbull's patented process, dubbed Magi, for capturing and displaying images at 120 frames per second in 4K and 3D on giant screens using conventional digital projectors. “I know that Cameron admired Showscan [Trumbull's earlier invention of a large-format high-frame rate projection system] and that he is

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- Adrian Pennington, Carolyn Giardina

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Blackmagic Enters VFX Business With Acquisition of Eyeon

12 September 2014 7:38 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Blackmagic Design is stepping into the visual effects business. On Friday, it announced the acquisition of Eyeon Software; both companies are privately owned and terms of the deal were not disclosed. Eyeon is the maker of the Fusion compositing system, a well-known tool in VFX that has been used on recent tentpoles including Maleficent, Edge of Tomorrow and The Amazing Spider-Man 2. According to Blackmagic, Fusion was also used by Douglas Trumbull on Ufotog, his latest project made for his new Magi system in 3D, 4K at 120 fps. The acquisition is the latest step in some bullish

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- Carolyn Giardina

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Tiff: Douglas Trumbull screens 'Ufotog,' makes case for immersive filmmaking

11 September 2014 7:15 PM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Filmmaker and legendary special-effects guru Douglas Trumbull gave a special demonstration at the Toronto Film Festival, screening 10 minutes of Ufotog, his high-intensity, 3-D immersive work-in-progress that he filmed at 120 frames per second. Most Hollywood movies are filmed and projected at 24 frames per second, the industry standard for almost 100 years, even though digital camera and projector technology has opened the door for much greater speeds. In 2012, Peter Jackson filmed The Hobbit at 48 frames per second—and though the film grossed more than a billion around the globe, many viewers flinched at the film’s “soap-opera” look.

Trumbull, who famously worked with »

- Jeff Labrecque

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Board of Governors Bias: Bacall, Garbo Among Rare Female Winners of Academy's Honorary Award

4 September 2014 2:58 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Honorary Oscars have bypassed women: Angela Lansbury, Lauren Bacall among rare exceptions (photo: 2013 Honorary Oscar winner Angela Lansbury and Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award winner Angelina Jolie) September 4, 2014, Introduction: This four-part article on the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Honorary Awards and the dearth of female Honorary Oscar winners was originally posted in February 2007. The article was updated in February 2012 and fully revised before its republication today. All outdated figures regarding the Honorary Oscars and the Academy's other Special Awards have been "scratched out," with the updated numbers and related information inserted below each affected paragraph or text section. See also "Honorary Oscars 2014 addendum" at the bottom of this post. At the 1936 Academy Awards ceremony, groundbreaking film pioneer D.W. Griffith, by then a veteran with more than 500 shorts and features to his credit — among them the epoch-making The Birth of a Nation and Intolerance — became the first individual to »

- Andre Soares

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Future of Film: VFX Legend Douglas Trumbull’s Plan to Save the Movies

2 September 2014 7:45 PM, PDT | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

A version of this story appeared in the Sept. 12 issue of The Hollywood Reporter.

On a sunny August day in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts, Douglas Trumbull, the 72-year-old visual effects legend, welcomes me to Little Brook Farm, the sprawling 50-acre property on which he lives and works with his wife of 13 years, Julia Trumbull, as well as an assortment of free-range donkeys, goats, chickens, roosters, cats and dogs. In addition to their home and animals, the compound also houses Trumbull Studios, a 10-building, state-of-the-art filmmaking facility that was financed with his proceeds from the Ipo of IMAX Corp., where he once worked. “We’re not a movie lab in the sense that we process chemicals,” says Trumbull of the operation. “We’re a movie lab in the sense that we’re looking for the future of movies.”

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- Anjelica Oswald

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Future of Film: VFX Legend Douglas Trumbull's Plan to Save the Movies

2 September 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

A version of this story appeared in the Sept. 12 issue of The Hollywood Reporter. On a sunny August day in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts, Douglas Trumbull, the 72-year-old visual effects legend, welcomes me to Little Brook Farm, the sprawling 50-acre property on which he lives and works with his wife of 13 years, Julia Trumbull, as well as an assortment of free-range donkeys, goats, chickens, roosters, cats and dogs. In addition to their home and animals, the compound also houses Trumbull Studios, a 10-building, state-of-the-art filmmaking facility that was financed

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- Scott Feinberg

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Preview: Schedule of the Biggest Film Festivals This Fall

20 August 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Aug. 21-Sept. 1

Montreal World Festival

Celebrating its 38th year with a distinctly Gallic flavor, Mwff will open with “We Love You, You Bastard,” from French director — and longtime festival supporter — Claude Lelouch. Montreal closes with a tribute to another French legend, the late Alain Resnais and his last film, “Life of Riley.” But it’s not all France all the time. The fest is dedicated to the late Latin American literary icon, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and will be developing the new European Films Screening section, along with greater co-production ties with a large Chinese delegation of key industry players.

ffm-montreal.org

Aug. 29-Sept. 1

Telluride Film Festival

Telluride has always been an intimate, casual, carefully curated festival that doesn’t announce its sked until the day before it begins. The festival’s reputation — it has hosted several Oscar winners and nominees over the years — means that cinema lovers don’t mind going in blind. »

- Iain Blair

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A closer look at Jodorowsky's Dune

25 July 2014 2:55 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Frank Pavich's documentary takes a tour of a classic sci-fi film that never was. Jules-Pierre takes a look at Jodorowsky's Dune...

Feature

"There are more unmade movies than there are made movies," says Frank Pavich, director of Jodorowsky's Dune, the documentary chronicling director Alejandro Jodorowsky's efforts to adapt Frank Herbert's seminal science fiction novel for the big screen. His effort began almost a decade before the generally unsatisfying David Lynch version hit theatres in 1984.

Back in the mid 70s, widely credited as the creator of the Midnight Film genre with the release of El Topo (which caused a riot during its viewing at a film festival in Mexico), and fresh from the success of The Holy Mountain, Jodorowsky was given his choice of subject for his next movie. He elected to adapt Dune, even though he had never even read the book.

"Dune will be the coming of a god, »

- ryanlambie

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

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