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‘Arrival,’ ‘La La Land’ Among Film Music Critics Nominees

‘Arrival,’ ‘La La Land’ Among Film Music Critics Nominees
The International Film Music Critics Assn. has announced nominations for the 13th annual Ifmca Awards for excellence in musical scoring in 2016. Leading the pack are Michael Giacchino and Justin Hurwitz with five nominations each, and Abel Korzeniowski, with four.

Giacchino is nominated for his work on comic book fantasy film “Doctor Strange” and the socially conscious box office hit “Zootopia.” In addition, his song “Night on the Yorktown” from “Star Trek Beyond” is up for film music composition of the year. A 36-time Ifmca Award nominee, Giacchino previously received score of the year honors in 2004 for “The Incredibles,” and in 2009 for “Up.”

Hurwitz’s “La La Land” work has already been a force this season, taking home two Golden Globes among countless other prizes. The contemporary homage to Hollywood movie musicals earned him Ifmca noms for score of the year, comedy score, and film music composition of the year. Hurwitz
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Saluting the film scores of Paul Verhoeven movies

Sean Wilson Mar 16, 2017

From Total Recall and RoboCop through to Turkish Delight and Flesh+Blood, we look at the musical scores of Paul Verhoeven films...

The Netherlands' arch-provocateur and filmmaker extraordinaire Paul Verhoeven is back in cinemas right now with Elle. A characteristically confrontational and provocative thriller, it spins a rape-revenge storyline into a mordantly funny, blackly comic and off-kilter odyssey, and has garnered an Oscar nomination for extraordinary lead Isabelle Huppert in the process.

See related The Maze Runner 3: Dylan O’Brien seriously injured on set Maze Runner 3 release now delayed, Dylan O’Brien still not back

It's exactly what we've come to expect from a veteran director who's done it all, having made jaws drop in both Europe and Hollywood - but beneath Verhoeven's love of excess and shock tactics lurks real artistry, and nowhere is this more evident than in the remarkable run of film scores
See full article at Den of Geek »

Toots Thielemans, Jazz Legend Famous for the Sesame Street Theme, Dies at 94

  • PEOPLE.com
Toots Thielemans, Jazz Legend Famous for the Sesame Street Theme, Dies at 94
Toots Thielemans, the jazz harmonica virtuoso best known for playing the theme to the iconic children's television series Sesame Street, has died at age 94. The Associated Press reports that he died in his sleep at a Belgian hospital, where he had been recovering from injuries he sustained in a fall last month. He had a familiar presence at international musical festivals for decades, until he retired from live performance in 2014. Throughout a career that spanned over seven decades, Thielemans worked with jazz masters including Benny Goodman, Charlie Parker, and Ella Fitzgerald - as well as contemporary electric fusion artists like Jaco Pastorius and Pat Metheny.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Peter Coffin’s Studio Playlist

  • Vulture
Peter Coffin’s Studio Playlist
For an artist whose practice is predicated on the somewhat subversive, it's no surprise that Peter Coffin would stack a playlist with Miles Davis and Kraftwerk and Tonto's Expanding Headband. "I don't have anything interesting or quotable to say about the songs I sent,” he wrote, somewhat teasingly, "They inspire different moods." Coffins's works do, too — whether with his outdoor Cloud installations or oversize taxidermy animal sculptures or slow-motion videos. For those times when you don’t know where you want to go but want the journey to inspire you, listen up.Terry Riley, "In the Summer" Miles Davis, "Little Church" Toots Thielemans, "Love Theme From 'The Getaway' Yesterday & Today" Kraftwerk, "Ananas Symphonie (pineapple symphony)" David Crosby, "Laughing" Tonto's Expanding Headband, "Riversong" Lifetones, "Good Side" Carlos Santana & John McLaughlin, "Naima" Grace Jones, "The Fashion Show" Was (not Was), "Wheel Me Out"
See full article at Vulture »

Hurricane Irene Forces Cancellation of Many NYC Cultural Events

Hurricane Irene Forces Cancellation of Many NYC Cultural Events
Getty The audience at a Central Park Summerstage event earlier this month.

As Hurricane Irene was expected to move north toward the greater New York area by the weekend, prompting the planned shutdown of the city’s mass-transit system, many cultural organizations went ahead and canceled events that were scheduled for Saturday and Sunday.

The Dave Matthews Band Caravan was scheduled to play Governors Island, with a lineup that included The Roots, Josh Ritter, Dave Matthews Band, and Gogol Bordello.
See full article at Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal »

Spartacus To Play As Part Of AFI’s Tribute To Steven Spielberg And John Williams

Just a few days after the release of Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing (as well as, albeit unofficially, his film Killer’s Kiss), as part of the Criterion Collection, fellow Criterion release, Spartacus, appears to be getting yet another day in the sunshine.

Turner Classic Movies and the American Film Institute have announced that they will be teaming up to launch a new series of screenings, entitled Quarterly Specials: TCM Presents: AFI’s Master Class –The Art Of Collaboration. As part of this series, launching on November 15, and will look at the collaboration between John Williams and director Steven Spielberg.

Now, where does Spartacus come in, you may be asking? Well, both Williams and Spielberg have cited Kubrick and the work of his composer Alex North, as influential on their careers. The film will be a part of the night in a special presentation.

It goes without saying that Spartacus
See full article at CriterionCast »

TCM And AFI To Launch Master Class Specials On Film Collaboration, Starting With Steven Spielberg & John Williams

Longtime Collaborators Steven Spielberg and John Williams to be Honored in First Special, Premiering Nov. 15

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and the American Film Institute (AFI) are teaming up for an extraordinary series of quarterly specials exploring some of the greatest artistic collaborations in film today. TCM Presents: AFI.s Master Class . The Art of Collaboration will launch Tuesday, Nov. 15, with an in-depth, one-hour special focusing on the 40-year collaboration between filmmaker Steven Spielberg and composer John Williams. Upcoming specials in the series will be announced later.

.It is understood that film is a collaborative art, but the enormously successful artists featured in these specials have taken collaboration to its highest level,. said Michael Wright, executive vice president, head of programming for TCM, TNT and TBS. .We are enormously proud to be working with the American Film Institute on this vital project, which will capture the vision and processes of artists
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Music in the movies: the scores of John Barry 1968-1979 part 1

Our detailed look back over the non-Bond scores of John Barry continues with a look at his work between the years 1968 to 1979…

In the third part of our John Barry retrospective, we enter the late 60s and a surge of activity that would typify the composer’s output for nearly two decades. Despite the exacting nature of his commissions, he continued to build on his reputation with a succession of quality scores that stockpiled brilliant and unexpected surprises on top of unprecedented new ground. But all the while, he continued to strive for authenticity of arrangement and sincerity of expression. This phase demonstrates his broadening outlook but also reflects, in a profound way, the diversity of his musical influences.

His early output took inspiration from both the rhythm and blues of The Barry Seven and the popular rhythms of the time, such as Gene Vincent and American guitarist Duane Eddy,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Music in the movies: the scores of John Barry 1968-1979

Our detailed look back over the non-Bond scores of John Barry continues with a look at his work between the years 1968 to 1979…

In the third part of our John Barry retrospective, we enter the late 60s and a surge of activity that would typify the composer’s output for nearly two decades. Despite the exacting nature of his commissions, he continued to build on his reputation with a succession of quality scores that stockpiled brilliant and unexpected surprises on top of unprecedented new ground. But all the while, he continued to strive for authenticity of arrangement and sincerity of expression. This phase demonstrates his broadening outlook but also reflects, in a profound way, the diversity of his musical influences.

His early output took inspiration from both the rhythm and blues of The Barry Seven and the popular rhythms of the time, such as Gene Vincent and American guitarist Duane Eddy,
See full article at Den of Geek »

A Master Class With Michael Feinstein

The most compelling aspect of the master class that Michael Feinstein recently taught at Five Towns College in Dix Hills, N.Y., was that by the time the two hours had elapsed, he had encountered—and made strides to correct—just about every problem faced by not only new but seasoned singers.Affable and amusing, as he always is on the bandstand, and consistently complimentary, Feinstein was there to help shape up eight wannabes taking a course taught by the singer La Tanya Hall, who performed behind him during his annual Christmas show at the New York club that bears his name, Feinstein's at Loews Regency. As this observer can attest, Feinstein was right to praise the participants for the quality of their voices and was also right in his introductory remarks to say he was there to assess their "truth in expressing the music."Awarded an honorary doctorate in
See full article at Backstage »

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