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8 items from 2006


Sundance sets its musical tour

22 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- Donovan, Terence Blanchard, Ron Sexsmith, Jill Sobule and Simon Townshend are some of the artists bringing music to next month's Sundance Film Festival, where organizers will hold a series of concerts and related panels.

Film directors Justin Theroux (Dedication), Tom DiCillo (Delirious), Andrew Wagner (Starting Out in the Evening) and Mike Chaill (King of California) will participate in a round-table discussion Jan. 24 with such composers as Blanchard, Peter Golub, Adam Hollander, Dave Robbins and Anton Sanko on the creative process of film scoring.

Later that day, Victor Krauss, Keb Mo, Michael Penn and Blanchard will perform in a special music showcase.

The special music events, sponsored by Sundance Institute's Film Music Program and music publisher BMI, also will include the "Sundance Celebrates Music and Film" and Film2Music, exploring the cinematic and music mediums.

In what has become a Sundance tradition, the fest's Music Cafe will host afternoon performances programmed by ASCAP, featuring such artists as Sobule with Julia Sweeney, A Fine Frenzy, Sexsmith, Donovan and Townshend throughout the festival. »

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Sundance sets its musical tour

21 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- Donovan, Terence Blanchard, Ron Sexsmith, Jill Sobule and Simon Townshend are some of the artists bringing music to next month's Sundance Film Festival, where organizers will hold a series of concerts and related panels.

Film directors Justin Theroux (Dedication), Tom DiCillo (Delirious), Andrew Wagner (Starting Out in the Evening) and Mike Chaill (King of California) will participate in a round-table discussion Jan. 24 with such composers as Blanchard, Peter Golub, Adam Hollander, Dave Robbins and Anton Sanko on the creative process of film scoring.

Later that day, Victor Krauss, Keb Mo, Michael Penn and Blanchard will perform in a special music showcase.

The special music events, sponsored by Sundance Institute's Film Music Program and music publisher BMI, also will include the "Sundance Celebrates Music and Film" and Film2Music, exploring the cinematic and music mediums.

In what has become a Sundance tradition, the fest's Music Cafe will host afternoon performances by such artists as Sobule with Julia Sweeney, A Fine Frenzy, Sexsmith, Donovan and Townshend throughout the festival. »

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Inland Empire

8 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

This review was written for the theatrical screening of "Inland Empire".VENICE, Italy -- It's a shame that David Lynch is such an artist. If he were more of a journeyman filmmaker, he might have made a pretty good picture about the blurring of life, real and imagined, with motion pictures, but instead he has come up with an interminable bore titled "Inland Empire".

"I don't understand what I'm doing here," Laura Dern says somewhere in the middle of the film, and she's not the only one. Filled with dreary sequences in poor lighting, incongruous scenes featuring characters who are never explained, with occasional startling images, the film lasts almost three hours and seems longer. Boxoffice prospects appear limited to Lynch devotees and the contentedly bewildered.

The annoying thing is that it starts quite well. Dern and Justin Theroux are starring in a movie being made by a director, played by Jeremy Irons, who surprises them by saying the film is a remake. The first one was never finished, he says, because the leading actors were murdered.

It's all nice and spooky at this point, with a foreign-sounding woman having previously warned the actress about time-shifting and how evil actions have consequences. Then the actress' husband cautions the actor that he had better not try anything with his wife.

As they begin rehearsals in a studio soundstage, there is an intruder behind the flats at the back, and the actor goes to look in the dark. The director has a shrewd-looking assistant named Freddie, played coolly by Harry Dean Stanton, who always is borrowing money from everyone.

Soon the actors in the film within the film are confusing themselves with the roles they are playing, and Lynch's film looks set to become a dense and intriguing psychological mystery about the inland empire of dreams and fantasies fed by the movies.

It all goes terribly wrong. Perhaps the sitcom sequence with people wearing rabbit heads is the first clue. A young woman is watching them on television, and there's a laugh track though she's crying. Then a woman (Julia Ormond) is talking to what appears to be a policeman about having been hypnotized by a man in a bar and how she is going to murder someone with a screwdriver.

Later, there is a roomful of wholesome and pretty young women whose chatter seems to be about boyfriends until one bares what apparently is a new set of breasts and soon they are all out on Hollywood Boulevard doing business. There are sequences in what sounds like Polish involving people who might be the characters from the original doomed film.

The actress weaves in and out of all these seemingly unconnected sequences, and she is either herself or the character from the movie she is supposed to be making or someone else entirely; it's hard to say.

Irons and Stanton are barely seen again. Dern works hard and gets to speak directly to the camera in the voice of a mistreated woman who has learned to be tough with men, but who she is by this time is anyone's guess.

There are conventional thriller episodes with sudden cuts and shrieks, sinister voices and skewed camera angles, but composer Angelo Badalamenti's music does all the heavy lifting. If it weren't for the extraordinary range and texture of his underscore, much of this film would sink without trace. »

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Inland Empire

8 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

VENICE, Italy -- It's a shame that David Lynch is such an artist. If he were more of a journeyman filmmaker, he might have made a pretty good picture about the blurring of life, real and imagined, with motion pictures, but instead he has come up with an interminable bore titled "Inland Empire".

"I don't understand what I'm doing here," Laura Dern says somewhere in the middle of the film, and she's not the only one. Filled with dreary sequences in poor lighting, incongruous scenes featuring characters who are never explained, with occasional startling images, the film lasts almost three hours and seems longer. Boxoffice prospects appear limited to Lynch devotees and the contentedly bewildered.

The annoying thing is that it starts quite well. Dern and Justin Theroux are starring in a movie being made by a director, played by Jeremy Irons, who surprises them by saying the film is a remake. The first one was never finished, he says, because the leading actors were murdered.

It's all nice and spooky at this point, with a foreign-sounding woman having previously warned the actress about time-shifting and how evil actions have consequences. Then the actress' husband cautions the actor that he had better not try anything with his wife.

As they begin rehearsals in a studio soundstage, there is an intruder behind the flats at the back, and the actor goes to look in the dark. The director has a shrewd-looking assistant named Freddie, played coolly by Harry Dean Stanton, who always is borrowing money from everyone.

Soon the actors in the film within the film are confusing themselves with the roles they are playing, and Lynch's film looks set to become a dense and intriguing psychological mystery about the inland empire of dreams and fantasies fed by the movies.

It all goes terribly wrong. Perhaps the sitcom sequence with people wearing rabbit heads is the first clue. A young woman is watching them on television, and there's a laugh track though she's crying. Then a woman (Julia Ormond) is talking to what appears to be a policeman about having been hypnotized by a man in a bar and how she is going to murder someone with a screwdriver.

Later, there is a roomful of wholesome and pretty young women whose chatter seems to be about boyfriends until one bares what apparently is a new set of breasts and soon they are all out on Hollywood Boulevard doing business. There are sequences in what sounds like Polish involving people who might be the characters from the original doomed film.

The actress weaves in and out of all these seemingly unconnected sequences, and she is either herself or the character from the movie she is supposed to be making or someone else entirely; it's hard to say.

Irons and Stanton are barely seen again. Dern works hard and gets to speak directly to the camera in the voice of a mistreated woman who has learned to be tough with men, but who she is by this time is anyone's guess.

There are conventional thriller episodes with sudden cuts and shrieks, sinister voices and skewed camera angles, but composer Angelo Badalamenti's music does all the heavy lifting. If it weren't for the extraordinary range and texture of his underscore, much of this film would sink without trace.

Inland Empire

Studio Canal

Credits:

Screenwriter-director-editor: David Lynch

Producers: Jeremy Alter, Mary Sweeney

Cinematographer: Odd-Geir Saeher

Composer: Angelo Badalamenti. Cast: Nikki/Susan: Laura Dern

Kingsley: Jeremy Irons

Freddie: Harry Dean Stanton

Devon: Justin Theroux

Jack: Scott Coffey

Henry: Ian Abercrombie

Also: Julia Ormond, Michael Pare, Mihhaila Aaseng

No MPAA rating

Running time 172 minutes »

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'The Ten' Shalt Have Twelve

7 August 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Quick Links > The Ten > Famke Janssen > Winona Ryder > Gretchen Mol > Liev Schreiber > Jessica Alba From Charlton Heston to Dudley Moore, the biblical standards set out in Genesis have long been the basis for Hollywood interpretation and visualization. None however have attempted it in quite the same way as David Wain’s (Wet Hot American Summer 2001) new film The Ten. Currently in pre-production, and set to film in Mexico and New York, the film will portray ten stories in an episodic style with a story representing each of the 10 Commandments. Winona Ryder, Franke Jansen, Gretchen Mol, Liev Schreiber, Rob Corddy, Ron Silver and Oliver Platt have all just been announced as joining Jessica Alba, Adam Brady, Ken Marino, Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux on the irreverent comedy written by Wain and Marino for City Lights. David Wain and Ken Marino each have significant comedic backgrounds as both performers and writers »

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There shalt be 7 more for indie 'Ten'

7 August 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Indie comedy The Ten now has 12. Winona Ryder, Famke Janssen, Gretchen Mol, Liev Schreiber, Rob Corddry, Ron Silver and Oliver Platt have joined the City Lights Pictures satire that spoofs the Bible's Ten Commandments. Jessica Alba, Adam Brody, Ken Marino, Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux already have boarded the project. Directed by David Wain (Wet Hot American Summer) from a screenplay by Wain and Marino, the film is shooting in New York and Mexico. Jonathan Stern is producing alongside Marino, Rudd and Wain. Morris S. Levy is producing for MEGA Films, while City Lights' Danny Fisher is executive producing with Michael Almog. Michael Califra will co-executive produce, and Marcus Lansdell will associate produce for City Lights. City Lights' credits include John Waters' A Dirty Shame for New Line Cinema. The production company recently teamed with MEGA on the starrer Descent. City Lights also is producing Interrupted, a feature adapted from director Nicholas Ray's posthumous autobiography I Was Interrupted and directed by Philip Kaufman. Wain is repped by CAA and Principato-Young Entertainment. »

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HDNet woos six for 'English' roles

4 May 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- Parker Posey, Drea DeMatteo, Gena Rowlands, Jeanne Moreau, Justin Theroux and Josh Hamilton are set to star in writer-director Zoe Cassavetes feature debut, Broken English. It's the latest movie greenlighted by HDNet Films, which recently decided to raise its budget cap on future films from under $2 million to under $5 million if the right stars are attached. This under-$5 million project was packaged by Vox3 Films with most of the financing lined up from Japan's Phantom Film and France's Back Up Films before Vox3 approached HDNet. "With the cast assembled, they needed someone who could pull the trigger on production in three weeks," said HDNet co-president Jason Kliot, a producer on the project. "The great thing about our company is that we have in-house legal and all the financing from Mark Cuban) and Todd (Wagner), so we had all the papers signed and the film going within a week." Phantom, Back Up and HDNet are co-producing the project. »

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The Legend of Lucy Keyes

1 March 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SANTA BARBARA -- Bad things happen to good city folk when they move to the sticks -- a standard setup that unfolds with lukewarm results in "The Legend of Lucy Keyes".

Screenwriter-director John Stimpson constructs a contemporary mystery around documented events that took place 250 years ago in central Massachusetts, where he lives and, along with other residents, has experienced the presence of an otherworldly being. The good-looking, low-budget film, shot on digital high-def in Princeton, Mass., site of the titular legend, captures some of those chills. But it's neither chilling nor convincing enough to spell much of a theatrical future for "Lucy Keyes", which world-premiered recently at the Santa Barbara film fest.

Jeanne and Guy Cooley (Julie Delpy, Justin Theroux) are trying the rural life for two reasons: He has been hired by the bossy, patrician Samantha (Brooke Adams) to design a wind-power project, and, as the script gradually reveals, the Cooleys need a therapeutic change of scenery after the death of their youngest daughter. Tween Molly (Kathleen Regan) has little patience for her young sister, Lucy (Cassidy Hinkle), who takes a more impulsive approach to the former farm they are inhabiting, quickly connecting with something unseen.

Hinkle has large, striking eyes like Delpy, whose Jeanne is ultra-alert to rattling doors and apparitions and in some ways as ethereal a presence as the ghost she senses. But while her disconnect from Guy (a natural performance by Theroux) makes sense, the tension between them reads as lack of chemistry.

Guy laughs off the ghost tales while dealing with local resistance to the windmills. According to chief opponent Gretchen Caswell (Jamie Donnelly), they would disturb the sacred site on Wachusett Mountain where Martha Keyes still searches for her daughter Lucy, who disappeared there in 1755. Taking a less reasoned tack, emotionally unstable farmer Jonas Dodd Mark Boone Junior) deploys foul-smelling clam bellies and bloody pig heads in a subtle effort to discourage his neighbors from getting too comfy.

Although Stimpson's depiction of Lucy and Jeanne's restless nights is not very original, he does tap into the intense mother-daughter bond at the heart of this haunting. Present-day mother and daughter uncover a centuries-old New England version of the Hatfields and McCoys, the revelations building toward a credulity-taxing climax. »

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8 items from 2006


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