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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 21 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


12 Must-See Films About Environmental Disasters

17 April 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

With Earth Day coming up next week, it’s the time of year to highlight documentaries dealing with our planet and its well-being. In other words, we’ve got environmentalism films to recommend. For our first list devoted to this theme, I’m interested specifically in the low points, the damage that’s been done to the earth, some of it ongoing and some of it remedied. These docs look at disasters like pollution, oil spills, changes to eco-systems and more. And they aren’t all necessarily issue films devoted to making a difference. Most are simply a look at what’s been done. All are necessary works to remind us, maybe affect us, but also to stimulate us in other ways, too. Below are 12 nonfiction features — a few of them Oscar nominees and a couple of them outright masterpieces — from Werner Herzog, Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, Noriaka Tsuchimoto, Joe Berlinger »

- Nonfics.com

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Competition: Win Ghibli's 'Pom Poko' on Blu-ray

17 April 2014 5:17 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

From acclaimed Studio Ghibli director Isao Takahata and available to own for the first time on Blu-ray here in the UK, 1994's Pom Poko is at once a unique window into Japanese folklore, a comedy of modern failings and also an elegiac tale of unlikely heroes fighting insurmountable odds. To celebrate the long-awaited Dual Format (DVD and Blu-ray) release of Takahata's Pom Poko Fill the Void this coming Monday (14 April), we have Three copies of this sumptuous Japanese anime to give away to our Ghibli-grateful UK audience, courtesy of the folks at StudioCanal. This is an exclusive competition for our Facebook and Twitter fans, so if you haven't already, 'Like' us at facebook.com/CineVueUK or follow us @CineVue before answering the question below.

»

- CineVue UK

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Rerelease: The King and the Mockingbird Review

16 April 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

A significant mark in the history of animation, The King and the Mockingbird celebrates the 30th anniversary of its UK release with a fully restored theatrical release. Based on Hans Christian Anderson’s fairy tale The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep, Paul Grimault’s interpretation takes place in an obscure kingdom powered by strings and pulleys and reigned by a vicious and greedy king.

After a series of fantastical events, this pompous royal is overthrown by his portrait, whose sole mission is to steal the escaped portrait figure of a willowy shepherdess from a handsome chimney sweep whom she loves. It has all the makings of Christian Anderson’s tales; forbidden love, jealousy and trickery. After a lifesaving encounter the Chimney Sweep and the Shepherdess are helped in their escape by a self-assured Mocking Bird who frees the pair from the King’s clutches on several occasions, aiding them through the trap laden kingdom. »

- Beth Webb

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Studio Ghibli Season – Grave of the Fireflies

15 April 2014 3:56 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

As part of the BFI’s Studio Ghibli Season, Simon Columb reviews Grave of the Fireflies

A Studio Ghibli season at the BFI has highlighted the very best of Japanese animation. We can define the cuddly Totoro or fantastical world of Princess Mononoke as what Studio Ghibli stands for – but Grave of the Fireflies proves otherwise. In fact, Isao Takahata’s 1988 film(released alongside My Neighbour Totoro) is a sobering, heart-breaking tale of those final years in Japan at the end of World War II, told through the eyes of two children, Seita and Setsuko. Grave of the Fireflies may be one of the most impressive, and surely ground-breaking, animations from the studio and challenges Disney – and western animators – to make such mature, intelligent and brutal films for a young audience.

Based on a novel by Akiyuki Nosaka, it is semi-autobiographical as he himself survived the fire-bombings of Japan while his sister died of malnutrition. »

- Simon Columb

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Movie Review – The King and the Mockingbird (1980)

14 April 2014 1:29 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The King and the Mockingbird (French: Le Roi et l’oiseau), 1980.

Directed by Paul Grimault.

Featuring the voice talents of Jean Martin, Pascal Mazzotti, Raymond Bussières, Agnès Viala and Renaud Marx.

Synopsis:

A chimney sweep and a shepherdess seek to escape from the clutches of a tyrannical king.

The modern animation industry is very much a business, as opposed to an art-form or creative industry. Looking at recent uninspired projects and unnecessary sequels such as Monsters University and Planes just to name a few, it’s easy to come to some clear conclusions about the state of contemporary animation. If it’s not highly merchandised, franchised or derivative, it doesn’t seem to get made, at least by the likes of Disney or Pixar.

The recent retiring of the masterful Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli fame only helps further cement this uninspired era in animated history. To bring this seemingly irrelevant introduction full circle, »

- Sam Thorne

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The King and the Mockingbird: watch an exclusive clip from the re-released animation by Paul Grimault

10 April 2014 9:22 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

An exclusive clip from the classic 1980 French animation, made in collaboration with screenwriter and poet, Jacques Prévert. The King and the Mockingbird, which has been cited as an inspiration by animators including Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, sees an evil king pursue a young sherpherdess and her boyfriend - a chimney sweep - through a magical world. The King and The Mockingbird is in UK cinemas tomorrow and on DVD 28 April

Read Peter Bradshaw's review Continue reading »

- Guardian Staff

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Pom Poko Blu-ray Review

9 April 2014 3:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Director: Isao Takahata

Starring: Shincho Kokontei, Makoto Nonomura, Yuriko Ishida, Norihei Miki, Maurice Lamarche, J.K. Simmons, Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Tress MacNeille, Clancy Brown,

Running Time: 119 minutes

Certificate: PG

Pom Poko has the distinction of being my least favourite Studio Ghibli film by a large margin. That is to say, I really don’t like it at all. It’s the story of a group of tanuki (mistakenly or simply named raccoons in the dub) who fight off humans from taken over their land. A very simple set-up for sure, but what follows is an awkward and confused film which mixes adorable animation with darker elements and a message as subtle as a kick to the groin.

The main objection to the film is that it mixes so many tones that it is hard to know how to take the film. The comedy is broad and slapstick, but never actually funny. »

- Luke Ryan Baldock

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Film Review: ‘The Tale of Princess Kaguya’

21 March 2014 7:51 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

An animated interpretation of “Taketori monogatari,” the 10th-century Japanese tale of a damsel who came to Earth from the moon, “The Tale of Princess Kaguya” is a visionary tour de force, morphing from a childlike gambol into a sophisticated allegory on the folly of materialism and the evanescence of beauty. Inspired by Eastern brush painting, this ethereal new feature from 78-year-old helmer Isao Takahata takes hand-drawn animation to new heights of fluidity. Studio Ghibli’s second release of the year has struck B.O. gold, earning roughly $22.7 million to date; at 137 minutes, it’s a bit taxing for tykes, but should get glowing reviews from anime fans upon its slated U.S. bow this year through GKids.

Eight years in the making and with a budget of roughly $49 million, Takahata’s pet project actually dates back to 55 years ago, when he assisted helmer Tomu Uchida in an eventually aborted attempt »

- Maggie Lee

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Gkids to Distribute Studio Ghibli's Princess Kaguya

19 March 2014 | Comingsoon.net | See recent Comingsoon.net news »

Gkids continues to build their relationship with Japan's Studio Ghibli with the announcement that they will be handling North American distribution for The Tale of the Princess Kaguya , the latest from the studio's cofounder Isao Takahata ( Grave of the Fireflies ), his first animated feature film as a director in 14 years. Last year, Gkids distributed Studio Ghibli's From Up on Poppy Hill and they also handle the North American distribution for the studio's library of films including Hayao Miyazaki's Spirited Away and Princess Mononoke as well as Takahata's acclaimed earlier film. Gkids plans on releasing Takahata's film in the Fall with a full campaign for awards, and Studio Ghibli is currently working on an English-dubbed version of the film with Frank Marshall »

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Gkids Nab Another Ghibli with Takahata’s The Tale of the Princess Kaguya

12 March 2014 5:00 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

It’s been far too long since legendary animator Isao Takahata sat at the helm of a feature length picture. Fourteen years since My Neighbors the Yamadas hit theaters, Hayao Miyazaki’s partner and co-founder of Studio Ghibli had his long awaited follow-up, The Tale of the Princess Kaguya, premiere in Japan back in November of last year to critical claim and awe at the stylistic deviance from Ghibli’s normative in-house aesthetic. Today, Gkids announced that they will be handling all theatrical and home release North American distribution rights for the English version of the film, which is being produced by Studio Ghibli and Geoffrey Wexler, with Frank Marshall of Kennedy/Marshall Executive Producing, the same team who dubbed both The Wind Rises and From Up On Poppy Hill. Gkids is planning for a late 2014 theatrical release, just in time for awards season submissions.

Gist: Blending the loose visual »

- Jordan M. Smith

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The Wind Rises | Review

21 February 2014 9:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Miyazaki’s Swan Song A Somber Flight Of Fancy

Earlier this month, legendary animator Hayao Miyazaki, writer and director of such masterpieces as Spirited Away, Castle in the Sky and My Neighbor Totoro, announced his final retirement (this isn’t his first).  How fitting that his final feature takes up his favorite thematic motif, that of magical phenomenon and fantastic human achievement – flight.  Oddly, for the first time in his lengthy career, Miyazaki has embraced the more realistic storytelling of his partner Isao Takahata, yet he hasn’t abandoned the lyrically imaginative storytelling he’s known for.  With Studio Ghibli’s signature hand drawn and heartfelt feel, The Wind Rises fictionalizes the life of Jiro Horikoshi, the chief engineer behind the famed Japanese Zero fighter jet, and blends his tail with that of Tatsuo Hori, author of the novel from which the film’s epithet originates.

Set on a grand »

- Jordan M. Smith

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Miyazaki Talks Retirement, Oscars, True History in 'The Wind Rises'

14 February 2014 5:11 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Those who were disappointed when Hayao Miyazaki officially announced his retirement back in September thought they saw a ray of hope when rumors circulated that the 73-year-old Studio Ghibli director of Oscar-nominated animated feature "The Wind Rises" might be willing to helm another movie. It all started when The Guardian reported that Miyazaki was working on a manga series, and Ghibli director Isao Takahata suggested that Miyazaki might pull back from retirement: 'I think there is a decent chance that may change. I think so, since I've known him a long time. Don't be at all surprised if that happens." Miyazaki had also called it quits after "Princess Mononoke" in 1997, vowing to never make a film again, only to release "Spirited Away" in 2001, which won him his Best Animated Feature Oscar. Well, I hate to break it to you, but during my satellite interview at Team Disney last week, Miyazaki »

- Anne Thompson

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Hayao Miyazaki Remains Animated Even in Retirement

14 February 2014 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

You’d think that after announcing his retirement from the feature film biz last year, 73-year-old Japanese animation legend Hayao Miyazaki, never one to seek out press, would be welcoming a time of quietude.

But with a third Oscar nomination in his pocket for “The Wind Rises,” which has earned $112 million in Japan, and with an  English-language version to be released in the U.S. by Disney on Feb. 21, Miyazaki’s days are far from innocuous.

“The Wind Rises” tells the story of Jiro Horikoshi, the designer of the A6M fighter plane, known in WWII as the Zero, and is a celebration of engineering as art, hewing close to the themes of Miyazaki’s previous Academy-friendly works: “Spirited Away” (2002), which won the Oscar for animated feature, cautions current generations to remember the mistakes of earlier ones; “Howl’s Moving Castle” (2005), which earned a nomination, promotes calm and reason in the face of aggression. »

- Carole Horst

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The top 22 haunting endings to modern movies

14 February 2014 5:57 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Odd List Simon Brew Ryan Lambie 17 Feb 2014 - 06:24

Whether they're bleak, shocking or sad, the endings to these 22 movies have haunted us for years...

Warning: There are spoilers to the endings for every film we talk about in this article. So if you don't want to know an ending for a film, then don't read that entry.

It's probably best to start by talking about what this article isn't. It's not a list of the best movie endings, the best twists, the most depressing endings or anything like that. Instead, we're focusing here on the endings that seeped into our brain and stayed there for some time after we'd seen the film. The endings that provoke in an interesting way, and haunt you for days afterwards.

As such, whilst not every ending we're going to talk about here is a flat out classic - although lots of them are »

- ryanlambie

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Brilliant Hayao Miyazaki Art Portrait Using Elements from His Films

5 February 2014 5:00 PM, PST | GeekTyrant | See recent GeekTyrant news »

"In order to grow your audience, you must betray their expectations."

Hayao Miyazaki wasn't only a talented artist and animator, he was an incredible storyteller. He brought so many wonderful characters and worlds to life. Deviant Art user C3nmt created this tribute portrait of the man using familiar elements from the movies that he has made. As you can see, it turned out brilliantly. 

Hayao Miyazaki (born January 5, 1941) is a Japanese film director, animator, manga artist, producer, and screenwriter. Through a career that has spanned over fifty years, along with Isao Takahata, co-founded Studio Ghibli, a film and animation studio. The success of Miyazaki's films has invited comparisons with American animator Walt Disney.

»

- Joey Paur

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Studio Ghibli Producing TV Series, Michael Pitt Joins 'Hannibal,' '24: Live Another Day' Gets Super Bowl Spot & More

4 February 2014 8:17 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Whether or not the legendary Hayao Miyazaki returns from his apparent retirement following his recent “final” film “The Wind Rises," the future of Studio Ghibli still remains bright. Miyazaki’s cohorts Isao Takahata and Hiromasa Yonebayashi have each lent their directorial talents to Ghibli films in the past (“My Neighbors The Yamadas," “The Secret World of Arietty”), but Hayao’s son Goro Miyazaki has also thrown his hat into the ring as well, and now he plans to take the studio into new territory on the small screen. In a post on the studio’s Facebook page, Studio Ghibli announced their first-ever foray into television with a Goro Miyazaki-directed adaptation of a book by Swedish author Astrid Lindgren – best known for her Pippi Longstocking and Karlsson-on-the-Roof books. "Ronja the Robber's Daughter" ("Sanzoku no Musume Ronja") follows a young girl, Ronia, who lives with her thief father in a castle »

- Charlie Schmidlin

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Studio Ghibli Producing TV Series, Michael Pitt Joins 'Hannibal,' '24: Live Another Day' Gets Super Bowl Spot & More

4 February 2014 8:17 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Whether or not the legendary Hayao Miyazaki returns from his apparent retirement following his recent “final” film “The Wind Rises," the future of Studio Ghibli still remains bright. Miyazaki’s cohorts Isao Takahata and Hiromasa Yonebayashi have each lent their directorial talents to Ghibli films in the past (“My Neighbors The Yamadas," “The Secret World of Arietty”), but Hayao’s son Goro Miyazaki has also thrown his hat into the ring as well, and now he plans to take the studio into new territory on the small screen. In a post on the studio’s Facebook page, Studio Ghibli announced their first-ever foray into television with a Goro Miyazaki-directed adaptation of a book by Swedish author Astrid Lindgren – best known for her Pippi Longstocking and Karlsson-on-the-Roof books. "Ronja the Robber's Daughter" ("Sanzoku no Musume Ronja") follows a young girl, Ronia, who lives with her thief father in a castle »

- Charlie Schmidlin

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10 Studio Ghibli Films Everyone Should See

26 January 2014 12:45 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Studio Ghibli

What’s Studio Ghibli you ask? Oh I don’t know…only one of the the most successful animation studios of all time, responsible for numerous award-winning films that break down cultural barriers with their universal appeal. Oh yeah, and some random guy called John Lasseter is a devoted fan. Some people even refer to Ghibli as the ‘Disney of Japan’, whatever that means. Really, what else is there to know?

Every Disney must have its ‘Walt’ and in Ghibli’s case, the main man in question is Hayao Miyazaki, a renowned director, animator and screenwriter who co-founded the studio back in 1985 with fellow filmmaker Isao Takahata. Together, the two men are responsible for some of the most financially and critically successful films ever made in Japan. Not too shabby eh?

Hayao Miyazaki’s latest film The Wind Rises is the third Studio Ghibli film to ever receive »

- David Opie

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Is Hayao Miyazaki Really Retiring? 'Wind Rises' Director Thanks Academy for Oscar Nom

16 January 2014 12:09 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

When Hayao Miyazaki officially announced his retirement back in September, it seemed like he wasn't going to back down. But since then, rumors have circulated that the 73-year-old Studio Ghibli director of Oscar-nominated animated feature "The Wind Rises" may not stick the landing. After news broke that Miyazaki was allegedly working on a manga series, Ghibli director Isao Takahata told The Guardian, "[Miyazaki] said, 'This time, I am serious,' but I think there is a decent chance that may change. I think so, since I've known him a long time. Don't be at all surprised if that happens." This isn't the first time Miyazaki has called it quits. Most notably after "Princess Mononoke" in 1997, he vowed to never make a film again, only to release "Spirited Away" in 2001, which won him his first and only Best Animated Feature Oscar.  Flares went up on Reddit last week, when one poster wrote: "Ghibli giant Hayao Miyazaki has. »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Watch The Simpsons Pay Tribute to Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli

10 January 2014 3:42 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

The Simpsons pay tribute to legendary animator Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli in their next episode, and the scene released below (which appears to take place during yet another drunken night out for Homer) is crammed full of references to many of their classic movies. Miyazaki announced his retirement last month, but the animation house he co-founded with Isao Takahata is thankfully going nowhere, and his final movie – The Wind Rises – is still set for a UK release.

In the clip, Otto is the Catbus from My Neighbor Totoro, The Kwik-e-Mart stands in for Howl’s Moving Castle, and a number of other Simpsons regulars appear as characters from across Studio Ghibli’s history. “Married To The Blob” airs this Sunday in the Us and also features an appearance from comic book legend Stan Lee and author Harlan Ellison. That scene can also be seen below. How many Studio Ghibli references can you spot? »

- Josh Wilding

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 21 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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