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The Day of the Jackal

One of the best international thrillers ever has almost become an obscurity, for reasons unknown – this Blu-ray comes from Australia. Edward Fox’s wily assassin for hire goes up against the combined police and security establishments of three nations as he sets up the killing of a head of state – France’s president Charles de Gaulle. The terrific cast features Michel Lonsdale, Delphine Seyrig and Cyril Cusack; director Fred Zinnemann’s excellent direction reaches a high pitch of tension – even though the outcome is known from the start.

The Day of the Jackal

Region B+A Blu-ray

Shock Entertainment / Universal

1973 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 143 min. / Street Date ? / Available from Amazon UK / Pounds 19.99

Starring: Edward Fox, Michel Lonsdale, Delphine Seyrig, Cyril Cusack, Eric Porter, Tony Britton, Alan Badel, Michel Auclair, Tony Britton, Maurice Denham, Vernon Dobtcheff, Olga Georges-Picot, Timothy West, Derek Jacobi, Jean Martin, Ronald Pickup, Jean Sorel, Philippe Léotard, Jean Champion,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Pattinson to Play E.T. Spaceman in Mystery Sci-Fier for Veteran Auteur Denis

Robert Pattinson: Actor to play E.T. astronaut. Robert Pattinson to star for Claire Denis If all goes as planned, Robert Pattinson will get to star in French screenwriter-director Claire Denis' recently announced – and as yet untitled – English-language sci-fier, penned by Denis and White Teeth author Zadie Smith and her novelist husband Nick Laird, from an original idea by Denis and writing partner Jean-Pol Fargeau. Among Claire Denis' credits are the interracial love story Chocolat (1988), the sociopolitical drama White Material (2009), and the generally well-regarded Billy Budd reboot Beau Travail (1999), winner of the César Award for Best Cinematography (Agnès Godard). Robert Pattinson, for his part, is best known for playing the veggie vampire in the wildly popular Twilight movies costarring Kristen Stewart and Taylor Lautner. Robert Pattinson, astronaut In Claire Denis' film, Robert Pattinson is slated to play an E.T. astronaut. But what happens to said astronaut? Does
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The HeyUGuys interview: Claire Denis talks Bastards

  • HeyUGuys
With twenty-five years of filmmaking under her belt, French auteur Claire Denis is still at it. Her latest movie is Bastards, a stark look under the bonnet of the upper class, revealing dark possibilities and even bleaker realities. It continues her run of films which look inwardly at cultures and the various factors that make them tick – or break – such as Chocolat or 35 Shots of Rum.

The director was kind enough to share some time with HeyUGuys about Bastards, and the methods and motivations behind making it.

Bastards stars Vincent Lindon, Chiara Mastroianni, Julie Bataille, Michel Subor, Lola Créton, Alex Descas and is in cinemas now.

Kathir a Madurai lad goes to Coimbatore with a purpose and very soon flips for the charms of a beautiful Pavithra who is their neighbor. But Pavithra is already in love with her friend Gautham who is ‘not a nice guy’. Kathir who was
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Bastards (Les Salauds) – review

Claire Denis weaves a powerful web of intrigue, vice and menace in this macabre thriller

Claire Denis has created a menacing and atmospheric neo-noir, as headspinning in its way as The Big Sleep. It isn't there to be watched and understood in the conventional sense, but experienced or inhaled. Denis has once again commissioned a pulsing original score by Tindersticks that enhances the disquieting mood. Vincent Lindon, a star in the old school of charismatic French masculinity, plays Marco. He is a sea-captain who returns to France when he hears his sister is in trouble. Her husband has committed suicide, driven to despair by debt repayments to a shadowy businessman (Michel Subor) – and also, apparently, by allowing this man to abuse his teenage daughter (Lola Creton) in lieu of cash. So for revenge, Marco sets out to seduce the man's mistress Raphaelle (Chiara Mastroianni) and mother of his infant son.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bastards Review

  • HeyUGuys
In Britain, the term ‘bastard’ is often affectionately implemented into speech amongst friends, as a commonly used term that has lost its sting somewhat, said endearingly, albeit mockingly, at times. However it would seem that in France, the word remains indicative of unpleasantness, and as poisonous as it’s intended, as within Claire Denis’ aptly named Bastards, there are some rather nasty characters to say the least. If this film was a physical object and you ran your finger across it, you’d be left with half an inch of dirt to wipe off, as this is a seedy, grotty and ultimately bleak affair.

Vincent Lindon plays Marco, who returns home to Paris following the suicide of his brother-in-law, to not only provide some comfort to his grieving sister (Julie Bataille), and physiologically damaged niece, Justine (Lola Créton), but to seek revenge also, as he targets the man who they
See full article at HeyUGuys »

'Bastards' (2013) Movie Review

Claire Denis' Bastards (Les Salaudes) may actually have a decent story, but she has muddled up the narrative to the point it's confusing as all hell. Even once the pieces start to come together, the film comes to a head-scratching conclusion of sex with corncobs and a close-up of a guy stroking his penis. Let's begin with the plot details I gathered after the opening moments and see where we get... It's raining very hard. A man has killed himself. A girl is walking naked in the streets. A man named Marco (Vincent Lindon) works aboard a container ship and receives a phone call with a family emergency and heads home immediately. Upon arrival he moves into an apartment without any furnishings. Here he makes eyes at the woman living downstairs and helps fix the chain on her son's bicycle. Following the film's opening minutes, those were the things I knew.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

The Future Is A Destiny You Don't Know: A Conversation with Claire Denis

  • MUBI
Photo © 2013 Wild Bunch - Alcatraz Movies - Arte France Cinema - Pandora Film Produktion.

Bastards [Les salauds] begins, like Garrel's Un été brûlant, at night, with a suicide. An explanation for the gesture will never come, although, through the film's near imperceptible ellipses, it comes close. A film of profoundly somber gloam, of loneliness and anger and even stifled madness, of complicity and solitude, its sadness is almost absolute.

A torrid string connects a cast predominantly made up from Claire Denis' family of actors: Vincent Lindon, Michel Subor, Alex Descas, Grégoire Colin. There are so many of them that they stand out as coming from somewhere before, some shared place, and their figures seem at once human and also something more so, grander, archetypal. (Lola Créton creates a similar effect in a small role with such a brief but so recognizable presence that it both reaches outside the story, as well as expanding something within.
See full article at MUBI »

Sensuous. Challenging, Mysterious. Dark. Maddening: Le Cinema of Claire Denis

Sensuous. Challenging, Mysterious. Dark. Maddening. Just a few words that have been used to describe the cinema of Claire Denis. Her work is being illustriously shown in the retrospective ‘Objects of Desire: The Cinema of Claire Denis‘ by Tiff Cinematheque this October.

Grasping for a word to capture her early work, notably Chocolat and I Can’t Sleep, this word would undoubtedly be spellbinding. In Chocolat, Denis’ poised directorial debut, a secondary character notes that the house where most of the proceedings occur has a spell on it, and the same can be said of the film’s bewitched viewers. In this personal and semi-autobiographical work, the film explores themes of colonialism, family relations, and conscious isolation and distance (exhibited in the characters’ relationships to one another, within themselves, and geographically on a much more monumental scale). These themes are oft explored in Denis’ early filmography, and recur in her later White Material.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Trailer for Claire Denis' 'Bastards' Doesn't Feature Any Corncobs

I saw Claire Denis' Bastards (Les Salaudes) in Cannes earlier this year and it has one of my favorite opening paragraphs to a review I've ever written: Claire Denis' The Bastards (Les Salaudes) may actually have a decent story, but she has muddled up the narrative to the point it's confusing as all hell. Even once the pieces start to come together, the film comes to a head-scratching conclusion of sex with corncobs and a close-up of a guy stroking his penis. Today IFC released the first domestic trailer for the film, which they plan on releasing in theaters on October 23 (iTunes on Oct. 25) and in their description they call it a "gripping thriller about money, sex and power" telling the story of "a ship captain returns to Paris to seek vengeance on the man suspected of causing his brother-in-law's suicide." The story seems simple enough, but the
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Bastards: Mood Only Goes So Far in Denis' Latest Oblique Odyssey

Bastards: Mood Only Goes So Far in Denis' Latest Oblique Odyssey
Claire Denis douses Bastards in her usual oblique dreaminess, equal parts romantic and malevolent, yet that style can’t fully compensate for a tale that, underneath its gorgeous aesthetic affectations, proves frustratingly undercooked. After the suicide of his brother-in-law, tanker captain Marco (a grave, intense Vincent Lindon) abandons ship and returns home to help sister Sandra (Julie Bataille), who blames her husband’s death on his renowned business partner Laporte (Michel Subor), and whose daughter Justine (Lola Créton) has attempted suicide after what a doctor (Alex Descas) claims has been severe sexual abuse. Working from a screenplay co-written by Jean-Pol Fargeau, Denis establishes her scenario – which also involves Marco striking up a ...
See full article at Village Voice »

Sound on Sight Announces Most Anticipated Films of the 51st New York Film Festival

The 51st New York Film Festival, running September 30th – October 13th, is coming up quickly and the full lineup is well under wraps. As Sound on Sight gets pumped up for the New York hospitality, here are our picks for the most anticipated films of the 51st Nyff, along with their official synopsis and trailer.

Captain Phillips

Paul Greengrass, 2013

USA | 134 minutes

“In April 2009, four Somali teenage pirates in a stolen Taiwanese fishing vessel seized the Maersk Alabama, a cargo ship bound for Mombasa. When the crew resisted, the pirates left with the Captain, Richard Phillips, and tried to make it ashore in the ship’s high speed lifeboat. What followed was a tense stand-off that was closely watched by the entire planet. Paul Greengrass, one of the incontestable masters of reality-based fictional filmmaking, and writer Billy Ray have crafted a film (based on Phillips’ account of the incident) that is
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Tiff 2013: ‘Bastards’ is a nocturnal nightmare that becomes impossible to shake

Bastards

Written by Claire Denis and Jean-Pol Fargeau

Directed by Claire Denis

France/Germany, 2013

Every detail matters in the films of Claire Denis. Her latest, and unquestionably her darkest film yet, Bastards, contains a wealth of information in its first few shots: a man on the verge of what we learn to be a suicide, pacing about his office with the rain crashing down outside; a naked girl, wearing only heels, slowly inching her way down a darkly lit street. We re-visit the latter of these shots later in the film, but under a completely different and disturbing context. Denis is back working in full L’Intrus mode, and while Bastards isn’t nearly as impenetrable as the aforementioned 2004 film, it’s an elliptically charged work that challenges and seduces with its wide gamut of unsettling images and sounds.

Intensely fragmented, the “thriller/revenge” narrative is put in slow-motion by the suicide of Jacques.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Bastards From a Basket; Sundance Selects Ropes Denis’ Cannes Sensation

A true whodunit type but of a different vibe, the one film from this years’ Cannes that should have gotten picked up around the same time they inquired about Blue Is the Warmest Color is the one film that had no business being regulated to the Un Certain Regard section. Sundance Selects will proudly feature their label at the front of the reels for the Tiff & Nyff festival screenings for Claire Denis’ Bastards. We imagine a deal was long in the works as the distributor has already affixed an October 25th release date.

Gist: Written by Denis and Jean-Pol Fargeau, supertanker captain Marco Silvestri (Vincent Lindon) is called back urgently to Paris. His sister Sandra (Julie Bataille) is desperate – her husband has committed suicide, the family business has gone under, her daughter is spiraling downwards. Sandra holds powerful businessman Edouard Laporte responsible. Marco moves into the building where Laporte has
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

‘Bastards’ Finds U.S. Parent in Sundance Selects

‘Bastards’ Finds U.S. Parent in Sundance Selects
Sundance Selects has acquired U.S. rights to Claire Denis’ family drama “Bastards,” three months after its divisive premiere at the Cannes Film Festival.

“Bastards” stars Vincent Lindon, Chiara Mastroianni and Michel Subor and was produced by Alcatraz Films and Wild Bunch. The film’s North American premiere will take place at the Toronto Intl. Film Festival, followed by its U.S. premiere at the New York Film Festival.

Sundance Selects is planning to release the film Oct. 25.

Lindon plays a captain on a container-ship called back to Paris by his desperate sister, portrayed by Mastroianni, to exact revenge on a powerful businessman who she blames for her husband’s suicide and the failure of the family business.

Scott Foundas of Variety gave the film a strong review at Cannes: “The insidious web of money, sex and power — a vintage film noir premise — entangles all of the characters in ‘Bastards,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance Selects Picks Up Claire Denis' Nyff Selection 'Bastards'

Sundance Selects/IFC Films is acquiring Us rights to Claire Denis’ 'Bastards,' which debuted at Cannes in Un Certain Regard and will play the Toronto and New York film festivals. Written by Denis and Jean-Pol Fargeau, the film stars Vincent Lindon, Chiara Mastroianni and Michel Subor, and was produced by Alcatraz Films and Wild Bunch. Sundance Selects is planning an October 25th release. Here's the synopsis: Bastards follows Marco Silvestri, a captain on a container-ship who is called urgently back to Paris by his desperate sister Sandra. Sandra’s husband has committed suicide, the family business has gone under, her daughter has gone adrift - and she holds powerful businessman Edouard Laporte responsible. Determined to exact a terrible revenge for the violence done to his family, Marco moves into the building where Laporte’s mistress Raphaelle lives; but he can’t avoid Sandra’s secret manipulations… or the fact
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Sundance Select Picks Up Claire Denis' 'Bastards'

Sundance Select Picks Up Claire Denis' 'Bastards'
Sundance Selects has acquired U.S. rights to Claire Denis’ Bastards, which had its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in the Certain Regard sidebar and is scheduled to play both the Toronto International Film Festival and the New York Film Festival. The distributor plans to release it Oct. 25. The film, with a screenplay by Denis and Jean-Pol Fargeau, stars Vincent Lindon, Chiara Mastroianni and Michel Subor, and was produced by Alcatraz Films and Wild Bunch. Linden plays a ship’s captain who is called back to Paris when the husband of his sister, played by Julie Bataille,

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Sundance Selects gets Bastards

  • ScreenDaily
Sundance Selects gets Bastards
The distributor has acquired Us rights from Wild Bunch to Claire Denis’ Un Certain Regard premiere and has set an Oct 25 release. Separately, FilmBuff and Abramorama are teaming up on Broadway Idiot while The Cinema Guild has picked up Agnes Varda’s five-part autobiographical documentary series.

Bastards will receives its Us premiere at the New York Film Festival next month.

Denis and Jean-Pol Fargeau wrote the drama about a ship’s captain pulled into a web of revenge by his sister in Paris. Vincent Lindon, Chiara Mastroianni and Michel Subor star. Arianna Bocco brokered the deal with Carlole Baraton.

FilmBuff and Abramorama will release Broadway Idiot, a chronicle of band Green Day’s collaboration with the Great White Way to bring their bestseller American Idiot to the stage, in nationwide theatres and on VoD on Oct 18. An exclusive New York theatrical engagement will kick off the run on Oct 11.The Cinema Guild has picked up digital and non-theatrical
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Bastards’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Bastards’
The insidious web of money, sex and power — a vintage film noir premise — entangles all of the characters in “Bastards,” a hypnotic nocturnal thriller from Claire Denis. Taking its loose inspiration from Kurosawa (the corporate revenge drama “The Bad Sleep Well”) and a startling act of sexual violence from Faulkner’s “Sanctuary,” this powerfully acted, unsettling roundelay of damaged lives is sure to offend gentler tastes (as it did in its divisive Cannes premiere), even if Denis has made that increasingly rare film in which the graphic acts depicted seem more necessary than superfluous. Fests and arthouse distribs that have long supported the maverick helmer should prove ready takers for this provocative item, which opens Aug. 7 in France.

In a scenario that also echoes Claude Sautet’s 1976 “Mado,” the pic opens with the suicide of debt-addled shoe manufacturer Jacques (Laurent Grevill), who was up to his eyeballs in debt to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes 2013. The Gloaming: Claire Denis' "Bastards"

  • MUBI
Bastards [Les Salauds] (Claire Denis, France)

Un Certain Regard

Bastards [Les salauds] begins, like Garrel's A Burning Hot Summer, at night, with a suicide. An explanation for the gesture will never come, although, through the film's near imperceptible ellipses, it comes close. A film of profoundly somber gloam, of loneliness and anger and even stifled madness, of complicity and solitude, its sadness is almost absolute.

A torrid string connects a cast predominantly made up from Claire Denis' family of actors: Vincent Lindon, Michel Subor, Alex Descas, Grégoire Colin. There are so many of them that they stand out as coming from somewhere before, some shared place, and their figures seem at once human and also something more so, grander, archetypal. (Lola Créton creates a similar effect in a small role with such a brief but so recognizable presence that it both reaches outside the story, as well as expanding something within.) The string
See full article at MUBI »

Cannes Film Festival 2013: 'Bastards' review

  • CineVue
★★☆☆☆ French director Claire Denis has maintained a wonderful run, from her 1998 debut Chocolat to recent efforts such as 36 Shots of Rum and White Material. Her latest, Bastards (Les Salauds, 2013), shows not in the main competition at Cannes - which, as ever, is woefully short on women - but instead in the Un Certain Regard strand. In retrospect, however, this decision might be just for Bastards, a broken revenge tragedy set in a rainswept France - a misstep, if not a downright stumble. A man commits suicide and his teenage daughter, Justine (Lola Créton), is found wandering the streets with blood running down her thighs.

The recently-deceased gentleman's friend and brother-in-law, Marco (played by Vincent Lindon, who many will remember from 2009's Welcome), is a ship's captain on an oil tanker stationed out in the Middle East. However, on hearing the tragic news, he returns immediately to France to find out
See full article at CineVue »
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