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1-20 of 339 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


The Imitation Game wins People's Choice Award at Toronto Film Festival

14 September 2014 12:47 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

The Imitation Game leads this year's winners at the Toronto International Film Festival.

The thriller starring Benedict Cumberbatch won the People's Choice Award, which was announced at the Festival's annual awards brunch on Sunday (September 14).

Many films that won the People's Choice Award have gone on to win Best Picture Oscar, with Slumdog Millionaire, The King's Speech and 12 Years A Slave all taking both honours.

The Imitation Game stars Cumberbatch alongside Keira Knightley, Mark Strong, Matthew Goode and Rory Kinnear.

Other winners at this year's awards include Beats of the Antonov and What We Do in the Shadows.

The full list of this year's Toronto International Film Festival winners is as follows:

People's Choice Award -
 The Imitation Game, directed by Morten Tyldum

People's Choice Award For Documentary
 - Beats of the Antonov, directed by Hajooj Kuka

People's Choice Midnight Madness Award - What We Do in the Shadows, directed by Jemaine Clement, »

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New Images of Colin Firth, Taron Egerton & Samuel L. Jackson in Kingsman: The Secret Service

12 September 2014 | The Daily BLAM! | See recent The Daily BLAM! news »

Based upon the comic book series by Mark Millar and Dave Gibbons, Kingsman: The Secret Service is written and directed by Matthew Vaughn (Kick Ass, X-Men First Class) and scheduled for theatrical release early next year. Kingsman: The Secret Service tells the story of a super-secret spy organization that recruits an unrefined but promising street kid into the agency’s ultra-competitive training program just as a global threat emerges from a twisted tech genius. Starring Colin Firth, Michael Caine, Samuel L. Jackson, Mark Strong, Jack Davenport, Mark Hamill and Taron Egerton, Kingsman: The Secret Service is scheduled for theatrical release on February 13th, 2015. »

- Pietro Filipponi

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Second Opinion – Before I Go to Sleep (2014)

11 September 2014 11:18 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Before I go to Sleep, 2014.

Directed by Rowan Joffe.

Starring Nicole Kidman, Colin Firth, Mark Strong and Anne-Marie Duff.

Synopsis:

14 years’ after suffering a head injury, a 40 year old woman wakes each day with no memory of her husband or the previous day’s events. With only a few select people to trust, she begins to question everything around her.

Opening with a close up shot of Nicole Kidman’s bloodshot blue eyes, the audience is immediately immersed into the confusion of Christine Lucas’ (Nicole Kidman) world. Based on the international bestseller by S.J. Watson, Before I Go to Sleep follows amnesiac Christine as she wakes each morning and has to be told by her husband Ben (Colin Firth) that she is in her mid-40s and that she suffers from a condition which causes her to lose her memory overnight.

Before I Go to Sleep presents an interesting premise »

- Helen Murdoch

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Tiff 2014 Review – The Imitation Game (2014)

9 September 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Imitation Game, 2014

Directed by Morten Tyldum.

Starring Benedict CumberbatchKeira KnightleyMatthew GoodeMark Strong, Charles DanceAllen Leech and Tuppence Middleton.

 

Synopsis:

English mathematician and logician, Alan Turing, helps crack the Enigma code during World War II.

A break and enter to the house of an eccentric Cambridge Mathematics professor whose off-handed and demeaning manner about the crime raises the suspicions of a 1950s British police detective; he goes about conducting an investigation expecting to uncover some treasonable activities but instead uncovers something else.

The man called into question is Alan Turing who was bullied at private school but was befriended and mentored by a classmate during the 1920s.  A similar relationship develops for Turing in the 1940s with the sole female member of the Bletchley Park code breaking team.  The period biopic shifts seamlessly between the three different decades, and an image develops of Alan Turing as »

- Trevor Hogg

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'The Imitation Game' (2014) Movie Review

9 September 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Beyond the professional accomplishments of Alan Turing depicted within the narrative of The Imitation Game, it's the way the film deals with his homosexuality, in a time where homosexuality was illegal in Britain, that makes it much more than your standard biopic. With a screenplay by Graham Moore, based on the book "Alan Turing: The Enigma", director Morten Tyldum (Headhunters) balances multiple timelines with precision, bouncing from Turing's childhood in the late '20s, to code cracking Germany's Enigma code during World War II and finally where the story begins, 1952, as Turing falls under the questioning eye of a police detective. Using these three narratives, Tyldum grants us access to specific turning points in Turing's life with Benedict Cumberbatch inhabiting the genius mathematician and cryptographer with what may be the best performance of his career. In a film entrenched in secrets, Cumberbatch is forced to play things close to the vest, »

- Brad Brevet

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The Imitation Game review: Cumberbatch captivates as Turing - Toronto 2014

9 September 2014 1:46 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Director: Morten Tyldum; Screenwriter: Graham Moore; Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley, Mark Strong, Matthew Goode, Rory Kinnear; Running time: 113 mins; Certificate: Tbc

In The Imitation Game, Cumberbatch plays famed British mathematician Alan Turing, a genius of logic and father of computer science, who helped shorten WWII by two years by building the first super computer and cracking the Enigma message code used by the Nazis. Directed by Morten Tyldum, the film is a lush period piece which shows simultaneous glimpses of Turing at three very pivotal points in his life: his childhood romance with boarding school mate Christopher, his time during the war working on a top-secret project to crack the Enigma code for the British army, and his "gross indecency" arrest later in life for being homosexual.

The film has many of the trappings of the historical drama - sumptuous cinematography, a dense echoing soundtrack, pristine sets and costume design. »

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The Imitation Game Review [Tiff 2014]

8 September 2014 10:01 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

“Pay attention,” Benedict Cumberbatch’s Alan Turing demands at the end of the long monologue that opens The Imitation Game, though it’s difficult to tell why. For one, the threatening intonation sounds like leftover scenery chewing from his Khan in last year’s Star Trek, and though The Imitation Game does demonstrate what a man of the future the real Alan Turing was, the portrait crafted is of a much gentler man. More importantly, it’s odd a film would request its audience to be so attentive to detail, when The Imitation Game itself cares little for any details it doesn’t spell out for you in capital letters.

Rotors of an encryption machine transition to the wheels moving Nazi tank treads, and a snubbed cigarette replaces a U-boat torpedo the moment before impact. A zinger-heavy script makes dialogue sound as though every punchline should be accompanied by the »

- Sam Woolf

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Before I Go to Sleep Review

8 September 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Cinema has long held a fascination with memories, from the different ways they can be manipulated (Inception, Total Recall) to how crucial they can be in defining who we are (Memento, The Bourne Identity). Before I Go to Sleep slots into the latter grouping; As directed by Rowan Joffé it’s a well-performed and solidly engaging thriller, but it won’t be joining the distinguished pantheon the aforementioned films reside in any time soon.

Based on the bestselling novel of the same name by S.J. Watson Before I Go to Sleep focuses on Christine Lucas (Nicole Kidman), who wakes up with no memory of her existence beyond her early 20’s after she was involved in an accident. She is told this and more information about her life every morning by her weary husband Ben (Colin Firth, reuniting with his The Railway Man co-star). She is also called each day by Dr. »

- Amon Warmann

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Movie Review – Before I Go to Sleep (2014)

7 September 2014 12:12 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Before I Go to Sleep, 2014.

Directed by Rowan Joffe.

Starring Nicole Kidman, Colin Firth, Mark Strong and Anne-Marie Duff.

Synopsis:

A woman wakes up every day, remembering nothing as a result of a traumatic accident in her past. One day, new terrifying truths emerge that force her to question everyone around her.

Here’s a film which relies entirely on the promise of a twist we never saw coming, hoping the hour or so we invest into the build up to said twist, and the ensuing payoff, will be worth the wait. The twist is great and I didn’t see it coming, but the build up and payoff really is not worth the price of admission.

The film, to its credit, wastes no time in getting into the story which, at a surface level, is quite intriguing. A 40 year old woman, Christine Lucas (Nicole Kidman), wakes up every day »

- Gary Collinson

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Before I Go To Sleep Review

6 September 2014 1:59 AM, PDT | www.themoviebit.com | See recent TheMovieBit news »

Based on the best selling novel by S.J. Watson, Before I Go To Sleep builds a dark psychological thriller around Christine Lucas (Nicole Kidman), a woman suffering from autograde amnesia after a terrible accident, who everyday wakes up with no memory of the past twenty years of her life. Seemingly in the care of her husband Ben (Colin Firth), while secretly been treated by neuropsychologist Dr. Nash (Mark Strong), she slowly starts to unearth her past, and finds there may be no one around her she can trust. Written and directed by Rowan Joffé, there is no denying Before I Go To Sleep grabs you from the opening frame. There is certainly some Hitchcock, with a bit of Mememto too, in it's DNA, and for the first half of the movie the tension is built nicely, as the mystery unfolds and you are kept guessing at every turn. As a narrative device, »

- noreply@blogger.com (Tom White)

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The HeyUGuys Interview: Author S.J. Watson on Before I Go To Sleep

5 September 2014 7:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

More and more popular books are getting the big-screen treatment, and the latest to have its name up in lights is Sj Watson’s bestseller Before I Go To Sleep. With an A-list class that includes Nicole Kidman, Colin Firth, and Mark Strong, it’s an engaging thriller that works hard to keep its audience guessing.

When we caught up with the author earlier this week, we quizzed him on what passage from the novel he was most looking forward to seeing on screen, what lessons he’s learned about his writing process, and plenty more.

How much did you know about amnesia and how much research did you do when you started writing the book?

I used to work at a place called the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery which is a hospital for people specifically suffering from a disease of the nervous system and the brain. I »

- Amon Warmann

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Cambridge Film Festival Review – Before I Go to Sleep (2014)

5 September 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Before I Go to Sleep, 2014.

Directed by Rowan Joffe.

Starring Nicole Kidman, Colin Firth, Mark Strong and Anne-Marie Duff.

Synopsis:

An amnesiac woman tries to regain her memories, as terrifying new information causes her to trust no one.

Before I went to see Before I Go to Sleep I asked a couple of people I knew who had read the book what they thought of it. The words that came up most were ‘unsettling’, ‘harrowing’ and ‘haunting’. Rowan Joffe’s adaptation, having also written the screenplay, lives up to the expectations and plays on these element to create a deeply unsettling and tension filled film.

Nicole Kidman plays Christine Lucas, a woman whom loses all the information she has gathered each night when she falls asleep. She wakes up with no idea where she is, quickly learning from her supposedly supportive husband Ben (Colin Firth) of what has happened. The »

- Gary Collinson

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Before I Go to Sleep movie review: memento worry

5 September 2014 5:47 AM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

When it finally collapses under the weight of its own preposterousness, this would-be elegant thriller becomes a cheap retrograde melodrama. I’m “biast” (pro): love the cast

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

And here I was all excited about an stylish and elegant thriller with a woman at its center, with a vaguely science-fictional conceit that works as a potent metaphor for some women’s unpleasant romantic experience. Except that was only the first half of the movie. And then Before I Go to Sleep had to throw that all away.

Ten years ago, 40ish Christine (Nicole Kidman: Grace of Monaco, The Railway Man) had an accident that left her with a weird form of amnesia: she can only remember stuff that happened today. Every morning when she wakes up, her »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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Before I Go To Sleep review

4 September 2014 8:52 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth come back together, for an adaptation of S J Watson's Before I Go To Sleep. Here's our review...

The scenes shared by Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman in The Railway Man earlier this year were the highlights by far of an otherwise disappointing picture. Both stars are excellent independently of one another, but there's clearly something about pairing them up that lifts the work of both.

The two share a lot more screen time in Before I Go To Sleep, writer/director Rowan Joffe's adaptation of the apparently strong book by S J Watson. In fact, they're in each other's arms as the movie opens, although we quickly learn that all is not well. Kidman's character, Christine Lucas, is suffering from memory loss after an unexplained incident. Each day, Firth's Ben Lucas needs to remind her of where she is, who he is, and her recent history. »

- simonbrew

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Amanda’s Adaptations: Before I Go to Sleep – Book Vs Film

4 September 2014 2:59 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Imagine waking up with no knowledge of who you are or who any of the people around you are. This is the case for Christine who wakes every day with the memory of the day before and most of the days before that wiped as she sleeps. When a doctor calls and informs her they have been working on getting some of her memory back, she discovers a journal she’s been keeping and learns that a lot is being kept from her that she might not actually want to discover.

Before I Go to Sleep is a masterpiece of compelling literature, impossible to put down until you, like Christine, know the truth behind her memory less. Her world is so small, too, that it’s difficult to see the bigger picture as she pieces bits together of the life she does not remember, thanks to what the two men »

- Amanda Keats

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Another Clip Arrives Before I Go to Sleep; Poster Premiere

3 September 2014 11:15 AM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

Another clip and the artwork for the new Nicole Kidman flick Before I Go to Sleep, directed by Rowan Joffe, are here; and you can check 'em out right now. Then forget them. Then check 'em out right now. Then forget them...

Look for Before I Go to Sleep in theaters on September 12th.

Written and directed by Joffe, the thriller stars Nicole Kidman, Colin Firth, and Mark Strong.

Synopsis

Before I Go to Sleep is based on the worldwide bestselling novel about a north London woman who wakes up every morning remembering nothing. Her husband tells her she suffered a trauma and that she dare not leave home. She sneaks off to a doctor who gives her a small digital recorder and urges her to play back her thoughts day after day in hopes of re-integrating her mind. She does. It works. And that's when she comes to realize »

- Steve Barton

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Film Review: 'Before I Go to Sleep'

3 September 2014 10:20 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★☆☆☆☆Best summarised as a watered down Memento (2000) aimed firmly at the Richard and Judy's Book Club crowd and based on the hugely successful novel of the same name by S.J. Watson, Rowan Joffe's Before I Go to Sleep (2014) is the sort of weightless literary adaptation that simultaneously irks fans of the source text and baffles those who have chosen to take the film-first route. Starring a scatterbrained Nicole Kidman and a woefully miscast Colin Firth as her doting hubby, with workmanlike yet sadly unremarkable support from Anne-Marie Duff and Mark Strong, the only thing Joffe's Before I Go to Sleep has going in its favour is that it's too brief to really lull you into slumber - despite its best efforts.

»

- CineVue UK

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‘Fury’, ‘Foxcatcher’, ‘Mr. Turner’ headline BFI 58th London Film Festival 2014

3 September 2014 9:47 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Fury (David Ayer)

[via the BFI]

The programme for the 58th BFI London Film Festival launched today, with Festival Director Clare Stewart presenting this year’s rich and diverse selection of films and events. The lineup includes highly anticipated fall titles including David Ayer’s Fury, Bennett Miller’s Foxcatcher, the Sundance smash Whiplash, Jean-Luc Godard’s Goodbye to Language 3D, The Imitation Game starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner, Jason Reitman’s Men, Women and Children and Jean-Marc Vallee’s Wild.

As Britain’s leading film event and one of the world’s oldest film festivals, it introduces the finest new British and international films to an expanding London and UK-wide audience, offering a compelling combination of red carpet glamour, engaged audiences and vibrant exchange. The Festival provides an essential profiling opportunity for films seeking global success at the start of the Awards season, promotes the careers of British and »

- John

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14 films to see at 2014's BFI London Film Festival: The Imitation Game, Whiplash

3 September 2014 5:25 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

The full lineup for this year's BFI London Film Festival was announced this morning (September 3), and as ever comprised an impressive cross-section of the biggest hits from Sundance, Cannes and Venice, spread across the festival's main competition entries and themed strands.

Digital Spy runs down 14 of the movies you need to catch if you're in the Big Smoke for this year's festival.

1. The Imitation Game

Following strong reviews at its Telluride world premiere last weekend, this intelligently crafted biopic of pioneering codebreaker Alan Turing is one of the year's first surefire Oscar frontrunners, with Benedict Cumberbatch's lead performance singled out for particular praise.

Cumberbatch stars as the brilliant but socially awkward Turing, whose groundbreaking work in computer science and cryptanalysis proved crucial during World War II, before his homosexuality led to his prosecution and apparent suicide in the 1950s. Keira Knightley, Mark Strong and Matthew Goode co-star, with Morten Tyldum (Headhunters) directing. »

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Before I Go to Sleep Review

2 September 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Director:  Rowan Joffe

Starring: Nicole Kidman, Colin Firth, Mark Strong

Running Time:  92 mins

Certificate:  15

Synopsis: A woman wakes up every day, remembering nothing as a result of a traumatic accident in her past. One day, new terrifying truths emerge that force her to question everyone around her.

Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth are husband and wife again for Before I Go To Sleep, the tense thriller based on the debut novel by Sj Watson. Christine (Kidman) wakes every morning with no memory of the previous ten years, or the life she’s had. Every morning, her husband Ben (Firth) explains that she loses any new memories every night when she goes to sleep.

Unbeknownst to Ben (and – until he reminds her – Christine), Christine has been seeing a doctor who is working out new ways of getting her memory back and bit by bit the pieces are falling back into place »

- Amanda Keats

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

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